Comments on Castlewood's New 5.7Gb Orb drive?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Has anyone used the new Castlewood 5.7Gb ORB removable drive? Their old
removable drive was problematic. As I recall, the older removable drive had
a cheap feel to it. The new cartridges seem to be costly (compared to
Iomega's). It doesn't seem like very many vendors are carrying the new
drive. I would appreciate hearing from anyone that has acquired this new
removable drive from Castlewood.
8 answers Last reply
More about comments castlewood drive
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    > Has anyone used the new Castlewood 5.7Gb ORB removable drive? Their old
    > removable drive was problematic. As I recall, the older removable drive had
    > a cheap feel to it. The new cartridges seem to be costly (compared to
    > Iomega's). It doesn't seem like very many vendors are carrying the new
    > drive. I would appreciate hearing from anyone that has acquired this new
    > removable drive from Castlewood.

    Get a 20 GB USB external drive. There are USB powered drives that
    are less than a pound and fit in your pocket for less than $200:
    http://www.buslink.com/index.cgi?view_product=yes&product_sku=677891120126

    Lynn
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Not worth considering with DVD now so cheap.

    Mark <news1@IntelligentSoftwareSystems.com> wrote in
    message news:10a8nf9guo9mi76@corp.supernews.com...

    > Has anyone used the new Castlewood 5.7Gb ORB removable drive?
    > Their old removable drive was problematic. As I recall, the older
    > removable drive had a cheap feel to it. The new cartridges seem
    > to be costly (compared to Iomega's). It doesn't seem like very many
    > vendors are carrying the new drive. I would appreciate hearing from
    > anyone that has acquired this new removable drive from Castlewood.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    In article <40a513eb$0$17091
    $811e409b@news.mylinuxisp.com>,
    NOSPAM.winsim@NOSPAM.winsim.com says...
    > > Has anyone used the new Castlewood 5.7Gb ORB removable drive? Their old
    > > removable drive was problematic. As I recall, the older removable drive had
    > > a cheap feel to it. The new cartridges seem to be costly (compared to
    > > Iomega's). It doesn't seem like very many vendors are carrying the new
    > > drive. I would appreciate hearing from anyone that has acquired this new
    > > removable drive from Castlewood.
    >
    > Get a 20 GB USB external drive. There are USB powered drives that
    > are less than a pound and fit in your pocket for less than $200:
    > http://www.buslink.com/index.cgi?view_product=yes&product_sku=677891120126
    >
    > Lynn
    >

    Agreed, USB/firewire drives are cheaper, not
    proprietary, fast, fairly sturdy.

    If it was a 57GB removable MO drive, it might be worth
    it, but at the 5.7GB size, it's cheaper to burn a DVD-R
    or use the external USB/firewire drives if you need
    read/write.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Mark" <news1@IntelligentSoftwareSystems.com> wrote:

    >Has anyone used the new Castlewood 5.7Gb ORB removable drive? Their old
    >removable drive was problematic. As I recall, the older removable drive had
    >a cheap feel to it. The new cartridges seem to be costly (compared to
    >Iomega's). It doesn't seem like very many vendors are carrying the new
    >drive. I would appreciate hearing from anyone that has acquired this new
    >removable drive from Castlewood.
    >

    New? They've been available for a couple of years now, so I wouldn't
    exactly call them new. The way the storage market has changed between
    when the ORB's first came out and now, I am suprised Castlewood is
    still in business. As for Iomega's offering, I assume you are talking
    about the REV. Anyone remember Jaz? How about the Peerless?
    _______________________________________________
    Colin Sewell mailto:csewell@telus.net
    Vancouver, BC
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Unfortunately, my Abit KG7 bios won't allow me to boot from a USB drive. I
    need an IDE/ADAPI removable hard drive. DVD drives are too slow to run an
    OS on. I'm trying to learn LINUX and some of the Microsoft server OS's.

    "Lynn McGuire" <NOSPAM.winsim@NOSPAM.winsim.com> wrote in message
    news:40a513eb$0$17091$811e409b@news.mylinuxisp.com...
    > > Has anyone used the new Castlewood 5.7Gb ORB removable drive? Their old
    > > removable drive was problematic. As I recall, the older removable drive
    had
    > > a cheap feel to it. The new cartridges seem to be costly (compared to
    > > Iomega's). It doesn't seem like very many vendors are carrying the new
    > > drive. I would appreciate hearing from anyone that has acquired this
    new
    > > removable drive from Castlewood.
    >
    > Get a 20 GB USB external drive. There are USB powered drives that
    > are less than a pound and fit in your pocket for less than $200:
    >
    http://www.buslink.com/index.cgi?view_product=yes&product_sku=677891120126
    >
    > Lynn
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    What's wrong with the simple solution, a single IDE drive with several
    partitions and a boot manager?

    Create three primary NTFS partitions for Windows, and put Linux in the
    extended.

    "Mark" <news1@IntelligentSoftwareSystems.com> wrote in message
    news:10aflc9e148jt15@corp.supernews.com...
    > Unfortunately, my Abit KG7 bios won't allow me to boot from a USB drive. I
    > need an IDE/ADAPI removable hard drive. DVD drives are too slow to run an
    > OS on. I'm trying to learn LINUX and some of the Microsoft server OS's.
    >
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    I think there are several problems with that approach:

    1) Limited to 4 operating systems (partitions).
    2) I probably wouldn't be able to have more than one Microsoft OS on the
    same hard drive if they behave like Windows (which expects to be installed
    first on the primary partition).
    3) A bad install can screw up the boot partition/record and cause your
    previously installed OS's to fail to boot.
    4) If the hard drive dies, you loose all the installed OS's.
    5) If I decide to change the OS on one of the partitions, it would probably
    screw up the boot partition/record on that hard drive.

    I already tried to create a simple dual boot XP/Linux on my slave drive on
    the primary IDE channel. I gave up after several failed attempts. I think
    the standard dual-boot installation instructions assume that your trying to
    do this on the master hard drive on the primary IDE channel. It doesn't
    work for the slave drive. I have a huge investment in my Windows XP
    installation on the master hard drive on the primary IDE channel and can't
    afford to take the chance of screwing it up by installing other OS's on the
    same hard drive and my XP needs all the space that my master hard drive has
    on the primary IDE channel.

    "Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote in message
    news:c88o9l02ths@enews2.newsguy.com...
    > What's wrong with the simple solution, a single IDE drive with several
    > partitions and a boot manager?
    >
    > Create three primary NTFS partitions for Windows, and put Linux in the
    > extended.
    >
    > "Mark" <news1@IntelligentSoftwareSystems.com> wrote in message
    > news:10aflc9e148jt15@corp.supernews.com...
    > > Unfortunately, my Abit KG7 bios won't allow me to boot from a USB drive.
    I
    > > need an IDE/ADAPI removable hard drive. DVD drives are too slow to run
    an
    > > OS on. I'm trying to learn LINUX and some of the Microsoft server OS's.
    > >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Mark" <news1@IntelligentSoftwareSystems.com> wrote in message
    news:10agfnvk4d3k0fe@corp.supernews.com...
    > I think there are several problems with that approach:
    >
    > 1) Limited to 4 operating systems (partitions).
    Nonsense. Download some boot managers and read the manuals.
    > 2) I probably wouldn't be able to have more than one Microsoft OS on the
    > same hard drive if they behave like Windows (which expects to be installed
    > first on the primary partition).
    Nonsense. Read up on boot.ini.
    > 3) A bad install can screw up the boot partition/record and cause your
    > previously installed OS's to fail to boot.
    Always activate the partition you are installing Windows to.
    > 4) If the hard drive dies, you loose all the installed OS's.
    Pointless. Can happen to your Orb too.
    > 5) If I decide to change the OS on one of the partitions, it would probably
    > screw up the boot partition/record on that hard drive.
    Nonsense. Perhaps NT4 uses an ancient MBR.
    >
    > I already tried to create a simple dual boot XP/Linux on my slave drive on
    > the primary IDE channel. I gave up after several failed attempts. I think
    > the standard dual-boot installation instructions assume that your trying to
    > do this on the master hard drive on the primary IDE channel. It doesn't
    > work for the slave drive. I have a huge investment in my Windows XP
    > installation on the master hard drive on the primary IDE channel and can't
    > afford to take the chance of screwing it up by installing other OS's on the
    > same hard drive and my XP needs all the space that my master hard drive has
    > on the primary IDE channel.
    >
    Yes, Linux installers are brain dead. Put Linux on another hard drive then.

    Use a real boot manager and you can fix any problems from the intstall floppy.
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