Western Digital ATA Hard Drive with 10,000RPM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard Drive
with 10,000 RPM?

--
Ryan Atici
atici_ryan_osmanli@hotpop.com
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22 answers Last reply
More about western digital hard drive 000rpm
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Ryan Atici" <atici_ryan_OSMANLI@hotpop.com> wrote in message
    news:2gt85gF69mnaU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard Drive
    > with 10,000 RPM?

    They rock!
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    > > What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard
    Drive
    > > with 10,000 RPM?
    >
    > They rock!

    Is the performance difference significant compared to normal IDE Hard drives
    with 7200RPM?

    --
    Ryan Atici
    atici_ryan_osmanli@hotpop.com
    To send email, remove _osmanli
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Ryan Atici" <atici_ryan_OSMANLI@hotpop.com> wrote in message
    news:2gt8pdF6c2rsU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > > > What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard
    > Drive
    > > > with 10,000 RPM?
    > >
    > > They rock!
    >
    > Is the performance difference significant compared to normal IDE Hard
    drives
    > with 7200RPM?

    Yes, faster.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Ryan Atici wrote:
    >>>What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard
    >
    > Drive
    >
    >>>with 10,000 RPM?
    >>
    >>They rock!
    >
    >
    > Is the performance difference significant compared to normal IDE Hard drives
    > with 7200RPM?
    >
    Yes, very few things give a full factor increase in performance like
    an increase in spindle speed. Going from 7200 to 10k is roughly a 38%
    increase, and you see all of it in real-world usage.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    > Yes, very few things give a full factor increase in performance like
    > an increase in spindle speed. Going from 7200 to 10k is roughly a 38%
    > increase, and you see all of it in real-world usage.

    I think most motherboards have 4 connections for Serial ATA Hard Drive.
    Then, I assume you can have 4 different Serial ATA hard drives inside a
    computer with different operating system on each Serial ATA hard drive,
    Windows 98 on the first one, Windows XP on the second one, Linux on the
    third one, and Unix on the fourth one. And you can go into BIOS and choose
    what hard drive you like to boot up.

    --
    Ryan Atici
    atici_ryan_osmanli@hotpop.com
    To send email, remove _osmanli
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Ryan Atici" <atici_ryan_OSMANLI@hotpop.com> wrote in message
    news:2gtkdqF6l8p1U1@uni-berlin.de...
    > > Yes, very few things give a full factor increase in performance like
    > > an increase in spindle speed. Going from 7200 to 10k is roughly a 38%
    > > increase, and you see all of it in real-world usage.
    >
    > I think most motherboards have 4 connections for Serial ATA Hard Drive.
    > Then, I assume you can have 4 different Serial ATA hard drives inside a
    > computer with different operating system on each Serial ATA hard drive,
    > Windows 98 on the first one, Windows XP on the second one, Linux on the
    > third one, and Unix on the fourth one. And you can go into BIOS and
    choose
    > what hard drive you like to boot up.

    Personally I would use a boot loader..
    Grub (installs with many linux distro's) is VERRY easy (i think) and it
    beats you modding ur bios settings.
    if you do use grub then read about the MAP command

    But yea you can do that ;) ..
    With grub you could (depending on how much space you need) install all 4
    operating systems on the same hard drive (dont know if unix would have a
    problem with grub or running from non-primary partitions)
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Ryan Atici wrote:

    > What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard Drive
    > with 10,000 RPM?
    >

    I don't think you will like them, so just send any you have to me.
    I'll also accept those itty-bitty 36GB 10K RPM HDs when you outgrow 'em.
    --
    <g> & Cheers, Bob
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On Tue, 18 May 2004 01:14:28 -0400, "Ryan Atici"
    <atici_ryan_OSMANLI@hotpop.com> wrote
    >
    >I think most motherboards have 4 connections for Serial ATA Hard Drive.

    Nope some have only 2 like mine

    >Then, I assume you can have 4 different Serial ATA hard drives inside a
    >computer with different operating system on each Serial ATA hard drive,
    >Windows 98 on the first one, Windows XP on the second one, Linux on the
    >third one, and Unix on the fourth one. And you can go into BIOS and choose
    >what hard drive you like to boot up.

    Nope the Silicon Image Bios does not permit you to choose which drive
    to boot from or at least the version on my Asus A7N8X E Deluxe does
    not. As posted elsewhere in this thread a bootloader is probably a
    better option.
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Andy Lee" wrote:
    >
    > Nope the Silicon Image Bios does not permit you
    > to choose which drive to boot from...


    (!) You mean it doesn't allow you to set the
    drive boot sequence (i.e. the boot priority)?
    Does it then just always boot from the same
    hard drive, not even letting you boot from a
    CD or maybe a floppy?

    *TimDaniels*
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On Mon, 17 May 2004 21:45:13 -0400, "Ryan Atici"
    <atici_ryan_OSMANLI@hotpop.com> wrote:

    >What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard Drive
    >with 10,000 RPM?


    Fast and expensive mine works fine as a high speed boot disk for XP
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Andy Lee <andy.lee@siemens.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 17 May 2004 21:45:13 -0400, "Ryan Atici"
    ><atici_ryan_OSMANLI@hotpop.com> wrote:
    >
    >>What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard Drive
    >>with 10,000 RPM?
    >
    >Fast and expensive mine works fine as a high speed boot disk for XP

    Not so expensive if you can live with a 36G, which many people can. I
    got one for my work PC, and have been playing with it a bit. It's
    noticeably quicker, no doubt.
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Ryan Atici" wrote
    > What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard Drive
    > with 10,000 RPM?


    Hi,
    I have two of the older 36GB Raptors in ICH5R RAID-0 and they are fast!!!!.
    The newer 74GB version is meant to be even better. If your not gonna go
    RAID-0 then one of the 74GB versions would be real sweet as your system boot
    drive (or grab a 36GB version if your on a budget). If your using a newer
    INTEL system that features the ICH5R then I can recommend the RAID-0!
    --
    Wayne ][
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "chrisv" <chrisv@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:gt6ka0ljbel5qpcenj7hpq0ub7qm1akohe@4ax.com...
    > Andy Lee <andy.lee@siemens.com> wrote:
    >
    > >On Mon, 17 May 2004 21:45:13 -0400, "Ryan Atici"
    > ><atici_ryan_OSMANLI@hotpop.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >>What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard
    Drive
    > >>with 10,000 RPM?
    > >
    > >Fast and expensive mine works fine as a high speed boot disk for XP
    >
    > Not so expensive if you can live with a 36G, which many people can. I
    > got one for my work PC, and have been playing with it a bit. It's
    > noticeably quicker, no doubt.

    HOLYSHIT...now let's go back and do some Google searches and find a nice
    quote regarding IDE for you to respond to!
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    > Hi,
    > I have two of the older 36GB Raptors in ICH5R RAID-0 and they are fast!!!!.
    > The newer 74GB version is meant to be even better. If your not gonna go
    > RAID-0 then one of the 74GB versions would be real sweet as your system boot
    > drive (or grab a 36GB version if your on a budget). If your using a newer
    > INTEL system that features the ICH5R then I can recommend the RAID-0!

    Yeah, two 36GB in RAID-0 gives you a decent 72 GB drive. And its
    FAST. On my computer, XP comes out of hibernation in 30 seconds
    between pressing the power button to seeing the desktop, and most of
    that time is the BIOS doing its stuff. Running two drives plus a
    third backup drive puts out a lot of heat though. That's one major
    drawback.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Why use hibernate when you can suspend to RAM? That only takes a few seconds.

    "Shailesh Humbad" <s@mailpass.com> wrote in message
    news:P6wqc.56$Uq1.35@fe2.columbus.rr.com...
    >
    > Yeah, two 36GB in RAID-0 gives you a decent 72 GB drive. And its
    > FAST. On my computer, XP comes out of hibernation in 30 seconds
    > between pressing the power button to seeing the desktop, and most of
    > that time is the BIOS doing its stuff. Running two drives plus a
    > third backup drive puts out a lot of heat though. That's one major
    > drawback.
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
    news:w56dnZG6qI5dpTfdRVn_iw@comcast.com...
    > "Andy Lee" wrote:
    > >
    > > Nope the Silicon Image Bios does not permit you
    > > to choose which drive to boot from...
    >
    >
    > (!) You mean it doesn't allow you to set the
    > drive boot sequence (i.e. the boot priority)?
    > Does it then just always boot from the same
    > hard drive, not even letting you boot from a
    > CD or maybe a floppy?
    >
    > *TimDaniels*

    I dunno about the SI bios.. but I have seen some that say "Boot Sequence"
    with the choice of "Hard Drive" or "Floppy" and "Allow CDRom Boot Y/N"
  17. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On Tue, 18 May 2004 09:21:36 -0500, chrisv <chrisv@nospam.invalid>
    wrote:

    >Andy Lee <andy.lee@siemens.com> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 17 May 2004 21:45:13 -0400, "Ryan Atici"
    >><atici_ryan_OSMANLI@hotpop.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>What do you think about the new Western Digital 74GB Serial ATA Hard Drive
    >>>with 10,000 RPM?
    >>
    >>Fast and expensive mine works fine as a high speed boot disk for XP
    >
    >Not so expensive if you can live with a 36G,

    Had one of those traded it for a 74Gb when I read the reports on it
    being a little faster and quieter than the 36Gb version. Dont know
    about quieter as my Coolermaster case with 2 inlet and 2 outlet fans
    aint quiet to begin with but the 74Gb is marginally quicker.

    > which many people can. I
    >got one for my work PC, and have been playing with it a bit. It's
    >noticeably quicker, no doubt.
  18. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    > Nope the Silicon Image Bios does not permit you
    > to choose which drive to boot from...

    Hmm, sorry to say this, but it just doesn't make any sense. You should be
    able to change the drive boot sequence. Maybe changing the drive boot
    sequence doesn't include ATA hard drives, but I strongly doubt it.

    --
    Ryan Atici
    atici_ryan_osmanli@hotpop.com
    To send email, remove _osmanli
  19. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote in message
    news:c8ep9801vel@enews1.newsguy.com...
    > Why use hibernate when you can suspend to RAM? That only takes a few
    seconds.
    >

    One turns the pc (and fans) off (nearly)
    One doesnt
  20. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "rstlne" <.@text.news.virgin.net> wrote in message
    news:Wjasc.574$E%6.102@newsfe6-gui.server.ntli.net...
    >
    > "Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote in message
    > news:c8ep9801vel@enews1.newsguy.com...
    > > Why use hibernate when you can suspend to RAM? That only takes a few
    > seconds.
    >
    > One turns the pc (and fans) off (nearly)
    > One doesnt
    >
    Bullshit. Hibernate and STR both run off ATX 5VSB, less than 10watts. The CPU,
    drives, and fans are all off. RAM is also refreshed in STR.
  21. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On Sat, 22 May 2004 01:26:15 -0400, "Ryan Atici"
    <atici_ryan_OSMANLI@hotpop.com> wrote:

    >> Nope the Silicon Image Bios does not permit you
    >> to choose which drive to boot from...
    >
    >Hmm, sorry to say this, but it just doesn't make any sense. You should be
    >able to change the drive boot sequence. Maybe changing the drive boot
    >sequence doesn't include ATA hard drives, but I strongly doubt it.


    You can change the Main Bios boot sequence which allows you to set the
    Silicon Image device (set it to Scsi for this) as first boot device
    but to choose which drive of the 2 (if you have 2 drives connected to
    the Serial ATA controller) you normally go into the Controllers Bios
    setup screens (Well with every other Scsi and SATA device I've used
    that is the case) There does not appear to be any such option on the
    Asus AN7X -E Deluxe that I currently use.


    Regards

    Andy Lee


    --

    It matters not whether you win or lose; what matters is whether I win or lose.
  22. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote in message
    news:c8r97202pe6@enews2.newsguy.com...
    > "rstlne" <.@text.news.virgin.net> wrote in message
    > news:Wjasc.574$E%6.102@newsfe6-gui.server.ntli.net...
    > >
    > > "Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote in message
    > > news:c8ep9801vel@enews1.newsguy.com...
    > > > Why use hibernate when you can suspend to RAM? That only takes a few
    > > seconds.
    > >
    > > One turns the pc (and fans) off (nearly)
    > > One doesnt
    > >
    > Bullshit. Hibernate and STR both run off ATX 5VSB, less than 10watts. The
    CPU,
    > drives, and fans are all off. RAM is also refreshed in STR.
    >

    I could be mistaken but I thought S4 turns off more than S3..
    Where S4 would normally keep the PSU fan going and S3 wouldnt..
    But shrug.. I guess I could be getting them confused.
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