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Anyone use Acronis Drive Image 7.0?

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Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 24, 2004 11:13:31 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

http://www.acronis.com/products/trueimage/

I need to do an image back up a machine. This looks like a better
solution than Ghost. Acronis allows you to do scheduled back ups
which is also a plus. Ideally I want to set up the clone machine
next to the older machine. Plug them both into the network and have
the new machine backing up the old once a week or every day.

I am also looking at R-Drive Image at www.drive-image.com/

Any suggestions?

More about : acronis drive image

Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 24, 2004 3:10:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

In article <9b942ce7.0406240613.514de87f@posting.google.com>,
FransHals <frans_hals5@hotmail.com> wrote:
>http://www.acronis.com/products/trueimage/
>
>I need to do an image back up a machine. This looks like a better
>solution than Ghost. Acronis allows you to do scheduled back ups
>which is also a plus. Ideally I want to set up the clone machine
>next to the older machine. Plug them both into the network and have
>the new machine backing up the old once a week or every day.
>
>I am also looking at R-Drive Image at www.drive-image.com/
>
>Any suggestions?


TI7 is working fine for me, in a similar fashion. I back a laptop and
a desktop to a huge disk in the desktop system that's shared out on
the ethernet. (I put my data files on CDRs and get them off-site,
also.)

I don't schedule backups.

The only shortcomming I can thing of is that it doesn't automatically
generate a name for the backup that is unique (include the date digits
and time digits, for example). I assume if it was a
scheduled/unattended backup it would always overwrite the previous
backup, which would be Very Bad.

I can tell you, from experience, that I can retore a C drive from a
network backup by booting from the Acronis cdrom and browsing my
network to find the backup share, and image. Very fast.

TI7 knows how to talk to SATA disks, and controllers. At least mine.

OTOH, I've had very unsatisfactory results trying to burn CDs from
TI7. But I never trusted CDs for critical backups, anyway. Maybe it's
bad karma.





--
Al Dykes
-----------
adykes at p a n i x . c o m
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 24, 2004 6:37:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

FransHals wrote:
> http://www.acronis.com/products/trueimage/
>
> I need to do an image back up a machine. This looks like a better
> solution than Ghost. Acronis allows you to do scheduled back ups
> which is also a plus. Ideally I want to set up the clone machine
> next to the older machine. Plug them both into the network and have
> the new machine backing up the old once a week or every day.

TrueImage is a great program.
Incremental backups, scheduling, Linux filesystem support, and native
"Network Neighborhood" support are a few of my favorite features.

The only place you might run into a snag is that since the recovery CD
is Linux-based, you might have trouble if you have some hardware which
isn't supported by Linux.

I question your "cloning" backup strategy, though. First, cloning is
intended for use between drives in a single machine. Even if you could
get some way to clone across machines, the hardware would need to be
pretty much the same between the machines. And I'm sure you'll
probably run into licensing/activation issues with XP if that's your OS.

Wouldn't it make more sense to do an "Image" backup. That way you can
take advantage of the scheduling, incremental, and other features of
TrueImage. Plus you can keep multiple levels of backups, depending on
your storage availability and backup needs. Heck, you can even
dispense with the whole older machine. Save on power costs, if that's
all that you'd be using it for. Just get an external USB2 or Firewire
drive. (Or even a spare internal drive)


-WD
Related resources
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 24, 2004 6:37:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

In article <SGBCc.152632$DG4.152256@fe2.columbus.rr.com>,
Will Dormann <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote:
>FransHals wrote:
>> http://www.acronis.com/products/trueimage/
>>
>> I need to do an image back up a machine. This looks like a better
>> solution than Ghost. Acronis allows you to do scheduled back ups
>> which is also a plus. Ideally I want to set up the clone machine
>> next to the older machine. Plug them both into the network and have
>> the new machine backing up the old once a week or every day.
>
>TrueImage is a great program.
>Incremental backups, scheduling, Linux filesystem support, and native
>"Network Neighborhood" support are a few of my favorite features.
>
>The only place you might run into a snag is that since the recovery CD
>is Linux-based, you might have trouble if you have some hardware which
>isn't supported by Linux.
>
>I question your "cloning" backup strategy, though. First, cloning is
>intended for use between drives in a single machine. Even if you could
>get some way to clone across machines, the hardware would need to be
>pretty much the same between the machines. And I'm sure you'll
>probably run into licensing/activation issues with XP if that's your OS.
>
>Wouldn't it make more sense to do an "Image" backup. That way you can
>take advantage of the scheduling, incremental, and other features of
>TrueImage. Plus you can keep multiple levels of backups, depending on
>your storage availability and backup needs. Heck, you can even
>dispense with the whole older machine. Save on power costs, if that's
>all that you'd be using it for. Just get an external USB2 or Firewire
>drive. (Or even a spare internal drive)
>
>
>-WD


If you do image backups you can keep several generations on the disk
you put your backups on. Always a good idea. TI7 gives you a range of
compressions to choose from. I pick the highest and get smaller
savesets. I can't see any downside.

If you backup to burnable media, always do a verification, then handle
the media very carefully.



--
Al Dykes
-----------
adykes at p a n i x . c o m
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 24, 2004 6:37:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

Will Dormann <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote in message news:<SGBCc.152632$DG4.152256@fe2.columbus.rr.com>...
> FransHals wrote:
> > http://www.acronis.com/products/trueimage/
> >
> > I need to do an image back up a machine. This looks like a better
> > solution than Ghost. Acronis allows you to do scheduled back ups
> > which is also a plus. Ideally I want to set up the clone machine
> > next to the older machine. Plug them both into the network and have
> > the new machine backing up the old once a week or every day.
>
> TrueImage is a great program.
> Incremental backups, scheduling, Linux filesystem support, and native
> "Network Neighborhood" support are a few of my favorite features.
>
> The only place you might run into a snag is that since the recovery CD
> is Linux-based, you might have trouble if you have some hardware which
> isn't supported by Linux.
>
> I question your "cloning" backup strategy, though. First, cloning is
> intended for use between drives in a single machine. Even if you could
> get some way to clone across machines, the hardware would need to be
> pretty much the same between the machines. And I'm sure you'll
> probably run into licensing/activation issues with XP if that's your OS.
>
> Wouldn't it make more sense to do an "Image" backup. That way you can
> take advantage of the scheduling, incremental, and other features of
> TrueImage. Plus you can keep multiple levels of backups, depending on
> your storage availability and backup needs. Heck, you can even
> dispense with the whole older machine. Save on power costs, if that's
> all that you'd be using it for. Just get an external USB2 or Firewire
> drive. (Or even a spare internal drive)
>
>
> -WD

The old machine has NT 4.0 SP 6. I would prefer to upgrade but I
really don't want to touch the old machine. It has on the front a
serial pot and USB 1.1. (which NT does not support).

1. So should I buy a new machine.
2. Remove the hard drive & put it in the old machine and do an Image
Backup.
3. Move the new drive back to the new machine and just use the new
machine.
4. Get an external USB2 or fireware or spare internal and use it on
the new machine?
5. Schedule back ups with True Image to the USB/Fireware/second
internal?

he moving the image over part from the old machine is what I am
confused about. I am trying to determine the easiest method.

Will the new machine work if it is using XP or 2000?

I think an exernal USB and DVD backs ups may be the safest.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 24, 2004 7:27:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Al Dykes wrote:
> The only shortcomming I can thing of is that it doesn't automatically
> generate a name for the backup that is unique (include the date digits
> and time digits, for example). I assume if it was a
> scheduled/unattended backup it would always overwrite the previous
> backup, which would be Very Bad.

A scheduled incremental backup will never overwrite an existing image
file. It will create a new backup file for each backup performed, using
the name: <BackupName>n.tib , where 'n' is an incrementing number.

From a previous post here, I'm told that a scheduled full backup will
overwrite the existing filename. I have not attempted this, so I
cannot verify that statement at this point.


-WD
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 24, 2004 7:27:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Thu, 24 Jun 2004 15:27:54 GMT, Will Dormann
<wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote:

>Al Dykes wrote:
>> The only shortcomming I can thing of is that it doesn't automatically
>> generate a name for the backup that is unique (include the date digits
>> and time digits, for example). I assume if it was a
>> scheduled/unattended backup it would always overwrite the previous
>> backup, which would be Very Bad.
>
>A scheduled incremental backup will never overwrite an existing image
>file. It will create a new backup file for each backup performed, using
>the name: <BackupName>n.tib , where 'n' is an incrementing number.
>
> From a previous post here, I'm told that a scheduled full backup will
>overwrite the existing filename. I have not attempted this, so I
>cannot verify that statement at this point.

That may have been mine, and it definitely will overwrite it, leaving
any previous incremental backups in place as orphans to be overwritten
by future incrementals. I don't like too many incrementals on the HD,
so this limits each backup to 7 files.

I reduce the risk somewhat by making an additional backup that doubles
as my DVD backup. While TI7 is making daily incrementals (one full on
Monday, dailies Tues-Sunday), I make an alternate full backup on
Wednesday that I keep in 4.5GB chunks. This one doesn't get
incrementals, and is the one I burn to DVD now and again to store
elsewhere. This way I have an secondary backup in case of problems
with the primary.

Another solution would be to use Second Copy to backup the images to
another HD, as it will keep up to 25 archival copies. It's a very
flexible file-backup program that works nicely in parallel with TI7.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 24, 2004 8:56:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Also, a guy could write a VERY simple batch file that will move the image
file to another folder so another full backup can also be done. I do this
right now using NTbackup for a daily backup, a scheduled batch file moves
the previous daily backup to another folder and then does the daily backup.
I keep 4 days worth of backups on a single removable drive-as well as a
monthly backup. I don't care for incremental backups if I have the space to
make a whole new backup file. Tapes can burn in hell, its all about RAID
arrays and HD backup these days. From the discussion that dominates this
group, I think backup is a becoming a BIG issue for everybody as even the
smallest businesses are running file servers these days. Makes me real glad
I know what I know.

By the way, as soon as possible I am going to start using Acronis. I tried
the demo and was VERY impressed.

--Dan

"Will Dormann" <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:_pCCc.7988$rL4.6348@fe2.columbus.rr.com...
> Al Dykes wrote:
> > The only shortcomming I can thing of is that it doesn't automatically
> > generate a name for the backup that is unique (include the date digits
> > and time digits, for example). I assume if it was a
> > scheduled/unattended backup it would always overwrite the previous
> > backup, which would be Very Bad.
>
> A scheduled incremental backup will never overwrite an existing image
> file. It will create a new backup file for each backup performed, using
> the name: <BackupName>n.tib , where 'n' is an incrementing number.
>
> From a previous post here, I'm told that a scheduled full backup will
> overwrite the existing filename. I have not attempted this, so I
> cannot verify that statement at this point.
>
>
> -WD
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 25, 2004 1:15:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

FransHals wrote:
>
> The old machine has NT 4.0 SP 6. I would prefer to upgrade but I
> really don't want to touch the old machine. It has on the front a
> serial pot and USB 1.1. (which NT does not support).

If you want a backup system for that particular machine, then put
another hard drive in the system and image to that. Should your main
drive fail (or a virus hits or whatever), you'll have a backup image on
your secondary drive.

If you want the drive to be usable in more than one system (or just want
to be able to swap out the drive), then get a removable drive bay along
with the drive.


-WD
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 25, 2004 12:14:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote in message news:<cbeqto$5ev$1@panix3.panix.com>...
> In article <9b942ce7.0406240613.514de87f@posting.google.com>,
> FransHals <frans_hals5@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >http://www.acronis.com/products/trueimage/
> >
> >I need to do an image back up a machine. This looks like a better
> >solution than Ghost. Acronis allows you to do scheduled back ups
> >which is also a plus. Ideally I want to set up the clone machine
> >next to the older machine. Plug them both into the network and have
> >the new machine backing up the old once a week or every day.
> >
> >I am also looking at R-Drive Image at www.drive-image.com/
> >
> >Any suggestions?
>
>
> TI7 is working fine for me, in a similar fashion. I back a laptop and
> a desktop to a huge disk in the desktop system that's shared out on
> the ethernet. (I put my data files on CDRs and get them off-site,
> also.)
>
> I don't schedule backups.
>
> The only shortcomming I can thing of is that it doesn't automatically
> generate a name for the backup that is unique (include the date digits
> and time digits, for example). I assume if it was a
> scheduled/unattended backup it would always overwrite the previous
> backup, which would be Very Bad.
>
> I can tell you, from experience, that I can retore a C drive from a
> network backup by booting from the Acronis cdrom and browsing my
> network to find the backup share, and image. Very fast.
>
> TI7 knows how to talk to SATA disks, and controllers. At least mine.
>
> OTOH, I've had very unsatisfactory results trying to burn CDs from
> TI7. But I never trusted CDs for critical backups, anyway. Maybe it's
> bad karma.


Are you able to get a perfect image dragging the files across the
ethernet network?

I guess i can just use one desktop with a big hard drive to back up
critical things if I can pull the drive image acroos the network.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 25, 2004 2:49:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

On 24 Jun 2004 14:10:47 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
wrote:

>The old machine has NT 4.0 SP 6. I would prefer to upgrade but I
>really don't want to touch the old machine. It has on the front a
>serial pot and USB 1.1. (which NT does not support).

There's a very good chance the True Image boot disk will recognize
your USB1.1 port and allow you to make a non-invasive backup from
this. I've done this several times on systems with old OS's. Power
down, plug in the external USB drive, boot to the TI cd or floppies,
and back up directly to the external drive. Slow, compared to USB2,
but very low risk.

>1. So should I buy a new machine.
>2. Remove the hard drive & put it in the old machine and do an Image
>Backup.
>3. Move the new drive back to the new machine and just use the new
>machine.

Far easier and less invasive would be to backup to an external via
boot disk as described above, plug this into the new system, and
restore to the new HD using the boot disk. Fastest would be to
install both HDs into the new machine and clone from the old to the
new. If you screw up and do it backwards, you're toast, which is
another benefit of the external - it leaves your original intact in
the existing system. Any problems at all, and you plug the old box
back in, just like before.

>4. Get an external USB2 or fireware or spare internal and use it on
>the new machine?

Each has benefits and drawbacks. Internal runs both on the same power
supply, so power supply problems could fry both disks at once. The
footprint is smaller, though, and there's no external to drop. If the
internal needed to be replaced, it's riskier to open up the system.

Externals can be moved around, plugged into other systems for
archives, replaced/serviced without risking the primary system.
They're easier to drop or misplace, and external cables (especially
USB, which are not always very secure) can come loose more easily than
internals.

>5. Schedule back ups with True Image to the USB/Fireware/second
>internal?

>he moving the image over part from the old machine is what I am
>confused about. I am trying to determine the easiest method.

TI7 has a function to clone one disk to another if both are on the
same machine. Easiest is with an external, since you only need to
plug USB connectors and boot to TI7.

>Will the new machine work if it is using XP or 2000?

Yes, but when you clone the old image over, the new machine will be
running identically to the old one - same OS, same drives, same
everything. This can cause a problem with hardware drivers and such.

>I think an exernal USB and DVD backs ups may be the safest.

I agree. This is what I do. At home, it has the added benefit that I
can lock the external drive in the safe when I go on vacation.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 25, 2004 7:19:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

FransHals wrote:


> Are you able to get a perfect image dragging the files across the
> ethernet network?

I wouldn't necessarily call it "dragging", but I back up over the
network all the time using TI.


-WD
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 25, 2004 7:57:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message news:<9kood0pgbhjts24e5535p4lidltrebmhff@4ax.com>...
> On 24 Jun 2004 14:10:47 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
> wrote:
>
> >The old machine has NT 4.0 SP 6. I would prefer to upgrade but I
> >really don't want to touch the old machine. It has on the front a
> >serial pot and USB 1.1. (which NT does not support).
>
> There's a very good chance the True Image boot disk will recognize
> your USB1.1 port and allow you to make a non-invasive backup from
> this. I've done this several times on systems with old OS's. Power
> down, plug in the external USB drive, boot to the TI cd or floppies,
> and back up directly to the external drive. Slow, compared to USB2,
> but very low risk.
>
> >1. So should I buy a new machine.
> >2. Remove the hard drive & put it in the old machine and do an Image
> >Backup.
> >3. Move the new drive back to the new machine and just use the new
> >machine.
>
> Far easier and less invasive would be to backup to an external via
> boot disk as described above, plug this into the new system, and
> restore to the new HD using the boot disk. Fastest would be to
> install both HDs into the new machine and clone from the old to the
> new. If you screw up and do it backwards, you're toast, which is
> another benefit of the external - it leaves your original intact in
> the existing system. Any problems at all, and you plug the old box
> back in, just like before.
>
> >4. Get an external USB2 or fireware or spare internal and use it on
> >the new machine?
>
> Each has benefits and drawbacks. Internal runs both on the same power
> supply, so power supply problems could fry both disks at once. The
> footprint is smaller, though, and there's no external to drop. If the
> internal needed to be replaced, it's riskier to open up the system.
>
> Externals can be moved around, plugged into other systems for
> archives, replaced/serviced without risking the primary system.
> They're easier to drop or misplace, and external cables (especially
> USB, which are not always very secure) can come loose more easily than
> internals.
>
> >5. Schedule back ups with True Image to the USB/Fireware/second
> >internal?
>
> >he moving the image over part from the old machine is what I am
> >confused about. I am trying to determine the easiest method.
>
> TI7 has a function to clone one disk to another if both are on the
> same machine. Easiest is with an external, since you only need to
> plug USB connectors and boot to TI7.
>
> >Will the new machine work if it is using XP or 2000?
>
> Yes, but when you clone the old image over, the new machine will be
> running identically to the old one - same OS, same drives, same
> everything. This can cause a problem with hardware drivers and such.

Yeah this may be the rub.

> >I think an exernal USB and DVD backs ups may be the safest.
>
> I agree. This is what I do. At home, it has the added benefit that I
> can lock the external drive in the safe when I go on vacation.

Smart.

Thanks for the feedback. This is exactly what I was looking for. I
want to do the safets backup first then if I want to throw a second
drive in the machine - I will have the back up.

I have bought the software and need to get an external drive. Anyone
have any preferences? Office Depot has a Maxtor 120 gb for about
$154.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 26, 2004 11:35:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

FransHals,

I was a big Norton Ghost fan. Lately I had some problems, even with
the latest version. With my new Dell, it would not recognize the USB
drive. With my daughter's new Compaq, it would lock up. Tried all
types of different procedures, switches, etc. No luck. Then I tried
Acronis Drive Image 7. Imaging was a piece of cake. I was able to
backup to a network drive, while still in Windows XP. We also use it
at work, and it is a great program. Works with Linux too.

See http://www.savingsdiscovery.com/specials/essentials.htm for some
special Acronis offers.

Happy imaging!

Joe
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 28, 2004 1:06:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

This is interesting. I am personally using PowerQuest (now Symantec) Drive
Image 7 which can backup disks or partitions in a Windows session. It is
possible to schedule backups. Some backups could not be used, though. This
is a problem I already faced with Drive Image 2002. I am now using Norton
Ghost 2003 and it runs smooth. Personally I think that running the backup
from DOS is a more secure operating solution. Considering the very good
feedback on Acronis software, I am going to try it.

- Frederic W. Erk, EIHSD.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 28, 2004 1:26:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

On 25 Jun 2004 15:57:20 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
wrote:

>I have bought the software and need to get an external drive. Anyone
>have any preferences? Office Depot has a Maxtor 120 gb for about
>$154.

I buy most of my hardware from www.newegg.com these days, but there's
a lot to be said for a local vendor if there's not a big price
difference. Returns are much quicker and easier, if necessary.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 30, 2004 4:04:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> Whatever tool you choose, you have to test the resulting backups.

Yes, I know. The fact is that I could not recover a backup made by Drive
Image 7.0 although I did test it before. I wanted to recover a system with
three bootable partitions (two hidden with BootMagic) and it would not work.
Alas, I did not put down all the details of this, so I cannot tell you more
about my potential mistakes.

- F.W. Erk, EIHSD.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 1, 2004 5:31:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

jojomar@volcanomail.com (Joe Frost) wrote in message news:<ae70e850.0406261835.24f410ab@posting.google.com>...
> FransHals,
>
> I was a big Norton Ghost fan. Lately I had some problems, even with
> the latest version. With my new Dell, it would not recognize the USB
> drive. With my daughter's new Compaq, it would lock up. Tried all
> types of different procedures, switches, etc. No luck. Then I tried
> Acronis Drive Image 7. Imaging was a piece of cake. I was able to
> backup to a network drive, while still in Windows XP. We also use it
> at work, and it is a great program. Works with Linux too.
>
> See http://www.savingsdiscovery.com/specials/essentials.htm for some
> special Acronis offers.
>
> Happy imaging!
>
> Joe

Thanks for all of the help and input from everyone.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 7, 2004 8:21:29 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

If it is SCSI or RAID, the system will not boot unless the adapter is moved to
the new system. IDE will have no problems, unless you aren't using Microsoft
ATAPI.

"FransHals" <frans_hals5@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:9b942ce7.0407071314.76b617db@posting.google.com...
>
> The machine I am running is a 3 to 4 year old HP Pavilion with NT 4.0
> SP6.
>
> I would like to image using Acronis 7.0 to a new machine and keep the
> new spare as the back up or maybe the old one as the back up.
>
> The problem is if I go out and buy a new Dell or HP - I can take the
> new drive out and copy an image with Acronis.
>
> If I plug the new drive in - I will have hardware problems or will I?
>
> If I will have hardware problems should I:
>
> 1. Try to find a used old Pavilion of the same model?
>
> 2. Open the old Pavilion and try to find the motherboard, BIOS and
> chip set? Is HP motherboard and stuff proprietary?
>
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 8, 2004 1:20:30 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

FransHals wrote:

> The machine I am running is a 3 to 4 year old HP Pavilion with NT 4.0
> SP6.
>
> I would like to image using Acronis 7.0 to a new machine and keep the
> new spare as the back up or maybe the old one as the back up.
>
> The problem is if I go out and buy a new Dell or HP - I can take the
> new drive out and copy an image with Acronis.
>
> If I plug the new drive in - I will have hardware problems or will I?

You probably will. Forget about trying to match the hardware. If
you back up the system with TrueImage (or whatever), all your data will
be there.

If the hardware changes are significant enough that the OS won't even
boot, then you can try doing an "in-place" OS installation over top of
what you've got and it should detect any new hardware. Or just install
whatever OS you like cleanly and then extract the important files from
the TrueImage backup file.


-WD
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 8, 2004 10:17:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

It is IDE. Thanks guys. I should have the (paid for) copies of NT
4.0 SP 6 if I need to install NT as he other fellow mentioned. I
guess I can also probably buy a copy on eBay.

"Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote in message news:<cci1cs02gnq@enews1.newsguy.com>...
> If it is SCSI or RAID, the system will not boot unless the adapter is moved to
> the new system. IDE will have no problems, unless you aren't using Microsoft
> ATAPI.
>
> "FransHals" <frans_hals5@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:9b942ce7.0407071314.76b617db@posting.google.com...
> >
> > The machine I am running is a 3 to 4 year old HP Pavilion with NT 4.0
> > SP6.
> >
> > I would like to image using Acronis 7.0 to a new machine and keep the
> > new spare as the back up or maybe the old one as the back up.
> >
> > The problem is if I go out and buy a new Dell or HP - I can take the
> > new drive out and copy an image with Acronis.
> >
> > If I plug the new drive in - I will have hardware problems or will I?
> >
> > If I will have hardware problems should I:
> >
> > 1. Try to find a used old Pavilion of the same model?
> >
> > 2. Open the old Pavilion and try to find the motherboard, BIOS and
> > chip set? Is HP motherboard and stuff proprietary?
> >
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 8, 2004 4:32:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 21:20:30 GMT, Will Dormann
<wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote:

>Or just install
>whatever OS you like cleanly and then extract the important files from
>the TrueImage backup file.

This is the technique I use when I help non-techies upgrade. Back up
the existing system to an image, perform a clean install of the new
OS, and install an extra backup drive, either internal or external.
The image of the old system stays on the backup drive, where they can
mount it and browse stuff they've discovered missing. It works well,
and is easy to walk someone through.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 8, 2004 10:36:18 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message news:<348re01kt8noqrq8ep8m9kgdhkikdafl49@4ax.com>...
> On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 21:20:30 GMT, Will Dormann
> <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote:
>
> >Or just install
> >whatever OS you like cleanly and then extract the important files from
> >the TrueImage backup file.
>
> This is the technique I use when I help non-techies upgrade. Back up
> the existing system to an image, perform a clean install of the new
> OS, and install an extra backup drive, either internal or external.
> The image of the old system stays on the backup drive, where they can
> mount it and browse stuff they've discovered missing. It works well,
> and is easy to walk someone through.

Many, many thanks to you guys.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 9, 2004 7:27:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message news:<348re01kt8noqrq8ep8m9kgdhkikdafl49@4ax.com>...
> On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 21:20:30 GMT, Will Dormann
> <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote:
>
> >Or just install
> >whatever OS you like cleanly and then extract the important files from
> >the TrueImage backup file.
>
> This is the technique I use when I help non-techies upgrade. Back up
> the existing system to an image, perform a clean install of the new
> OS, and install an extra backup drive, either internal or external.
> The image of the old system stays on the backup drive, where they can
> mount it and browse stuff they've discovered missing. It works well,
> and is easy to walk someone through.

For the spare machine should I get a $349 Dell desktop or one of their
$399 servers.

They will actually come out and copy over 3 gig of selected files for
$85 but I have more than that.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 10, 2004 8:17:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals) wrote in message news:<9b942ce7.0407091427.51c69b49@posting.google.com>...
> Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message news:<348re01kt8noqrq8ep8m9kgdhkikdafl49@4ax.com>...
> > On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 21:20:30 GMT, Will Dormann
> > <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote:
> >
> > >Or just install
> > >whatever OS you like cleanly and then extract the important files from
> > >the TrueImage backup file.
> >
> > This is the technique I use when I help non-techies upgrade. Back up
> > the existing system to an image, perform a clean install of the new
> > OS, and install an extra backup drive, either internal or external.
> > The image of the old system stays on the backup drive, where they can
> > mount it and browse stuff they've discovered missing. It works well,
> > and is easy to walk someone through.
>
> For the spare machine should I get a $349 Dell desktop or one of their
> $399 servers.
>
> They will actually come out and copy over 3 gig of selected files for
> $85 but I have more than that.

I don't see any info about a USB on the server. I assume the desktop
will have it. The server also does not have an O/S. Can I copy over
the NT 4.0 SP 6 in my image from he other machine. I guess I could
plug in the Dell drive in the Old HP Pavilion hough I really don't
want to take the HP apart.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 11, 2004 3:53:24 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

FransHals wrote:

> frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals) wrote in message
> news:<9b942ce7.0407091427.51c69b49@posting.google.com>...
>> Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
>> news:<348re01kt8noqrq8ep8m9kgdhkikdafl49@4ax.com>...
>> > On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 21:20:30 GMT, Will Dormann
>> > <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote:
>> >
>> > >Or just install
>> > >whatever OS you like cleanly and then extract the important files from
>> > >the TrueImage backup file.
>> >
>> > This is the technique I use when I help non-techies upgrade. Back up
>> > the existing system to an image, perform a clean install of the new
>> > OS, and install an extra backup drive, either internal or external.
>> > The image of the old system stays on the backup drive, where they can
>> > mount it and browse stuff they've discovered missing. It works well,
>> > and is easy to walk someone through.
>>
>> For the spare machine should I get a $349 Dell desktop or one of their
>> $399 servers.
>>
>> They will actually come out and copy over 3 gig of selected files for
>> $85 but I have more than that.
>
> I don't see any info about a USB on the server. I assume the desktop
> will have it. The server also does not have an O/S. Can I copy over
> the NT 4.0 SP 6 in my image from he other machine. I guess I could
> plug in the Dell drive in the Old HP Pavilion hough I really don't
> want to take the HP apart.

I presume you're talking about the 400SC (which incidentally starts at
$249US at the moment). Has 6 USB 2.0 ports.

Comparing that with the Dimension 2400, which I presume is the "$349 Dell
desktop", the 400SC holds 4 gig ECC RAM vs 1 gig non-ECC on the Dimension,
the 400SC has Rage XL video vs Intel integrated on the 2400. The 400SC has
2 3.5" internal bays vs 1 on the 2400. The 400SC doesn't include an
OS--the ones available are 2K/2K3 server variants and RedHat Linux, all for
server OS prices.

While you may be able to get your NT4 to run on it, there's no USB support
in NT and you'll be running the chipset on generic drivers.

Personally if I was forced to go with one of those two machines I'd go with
the 400SC, but for me the OS is not an issue at the moment.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 12, 2004 5:10:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message news:<ccqe0o02ui1@news1.newsguy.com>...
> FransHals wrote:
>
> > frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals) wrote in message
> > news:<9b942ce7.0407091427.51c69b49@posting.google.com>...
> >> Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
> >> news:<348re01kt8noqrq8ep8m9kgdhkikdafl49@4ax.com>...
> >> > On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 21:20:30 GMT, Will Dormann
> >> > <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote:
> >> >
> >> > >Or just install
> >> > >whatever OS you like cleanly and then extract the important files from
> >> > >the TrueImage backup file.
> >> >
> >> > This is the technique I use when I help non-techies upgrade. Back up
> >> > the existing system to an image, perform a clean install of the new
> >> > OS, and install an extra backup drive, either internal or external.
> >> > The image of the old system stays on the backup drive, where they can
> >> > mount it and browse stuff they've discovered missing. It works well,
> >> > and is easy to walk someone through.
> >>
> >> For the spare machine should I get a $349 Dell desktop or one of their
> >> $399 servers.
> >>
> >> They will actually come out and copy over 3 gig of selected files for
> >> $85 but I have more than that.
> >
> > I don't see any info about a USB on the server. I assume the desktop
> > will have it. The server also does not have an O/S. Can I copy over
> > the NT 4.0 SP 6 in my image from he other machine. I guess I could
> > plug in the Dell drive in the Old HP Pavilion hough I really don't
> > want to take the HP apart.
>
> I presume you're talking about the 400SC (which incidentally starts at
> $249US at the moment). Has 6 USB 2.0 ports.
>
> Comparing that with the Dimension 2400, which I presume is the "$349 Dell
> desktop", the 400SC holds 4 gig ECC RAM vs 1 gig non-ECC on the Dimension,
> the 400SC has Rage XL video vs Intel integrated on the 2400. The 400SC has
> 2 3.5" internal bays vs 1 on the 2400. The 400SC doesn't include an
> OS--the ones available are 2K/2K3 server variants and RedHat Linux, all for
> server OS prices.
>
> While you may be able to get your NT4 to run on it, there's no USB support
> in NT and you'll be running the chipset on generic drivers.
>
> Personally if I was forced to go with one of those two machines I'd go with
> the 400SC, but for me the OS is not an issue at the moment.

Thanks.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 9:58:32 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote"
> TI7 knows how to talk to SATA disks, and controllers. At least mine.

Not mine. It won't write to my SATA 36 GB Raptors.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 1:07:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"JPD" <homebuilt@guitarist.com> wrote in message
news:636bc0d2.0407160458.1a921dfe@posting.google.com...
> adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote"
> > TI7 knows how to talk to SATA disks, and controllers. At least mine.
>
> Not mine. It won't write to my SATA 36 GB Raptors.

What controller exactly is the 36GB Raptor attached to? How does it fail,
please?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 5:53:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
> "JPD" <homebuilt@guitarist.com> kindly responded:
> > adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:
> > > TI7 knows how to talk to SATA disks, and controllers. At least mine.
> >
> > Not mine. It won't write to my SATA 36 GB Raptors.
>
> What controller exactly is the 36GB Raptor attached to? How does it fail,
> please?

The controller is integrated in ICH5R on the MSI 875P Neo_FISR
motherboard:
http://www.msicomputer.com/product/p_spec.asp?model=875...

The error message occurs when I try to restore any image I make with
TI7. I open TI7 in Windows, execute the first several steps in the
restoration procedure, then hit the PROCEED button. Immediately comes
the error message: "Failed to write to the sector 0 of the hard disk
2."

Thank you for responding!
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 23, 2004 8:45:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message news:<9kood0pgbhjts24e5535p4lidltrebmhff@4ax.com>...
> On 24 Jun 2004 14:10:47 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
> wrote:
>
> >The old machine has NT 4.0 SP 6. I would prefer to upgrade but I
> >really don't want to touch the old machine. It has on the front a
> >serial pot and USB 1.1. (which NT does not support).
>
> There's a very good chance the True Image boot disk will recognize
> your USB1.1 port and allow you to make a non-invasive backup from
> this. I've done this several times on systems with old OS's. Power
> down, plug in the external USB drive, boot to the TI cd or floppies,
> and back up directly to the external drive. Slow, compared to USB2,
> but very low risk.


This sounds stupid but do I load Acronis True Image 7.0 on the old
machine or do I just use the True Image boot disk that I made?

Do I "back up" or run the True Image "disk clone" or "create image."

Thanks for your help.


Once I have the Image (backup) on the Western Digital external - I
want to open the Pavilion and put and second drive in and image that.

Finally, I will remove the new Dell machines drive and plug it in to
image.
I will then put it in the Dell and hope it boots. Acronis suggests
going to MSFT and has some suggestions on making it work on different
hardware.

I may also call Dell to see if they will come out to do imaging.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 23, 2004 9:12:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

Will Dormann <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote in message news:<SGBCc.152632$DG4.152256@fe2.columbus.rr.com>...
> FransHals wrote:
> > http://www.acronis.com/products/trueimage/
> >
> > I need to do an image back up a machine. This looks like a better
> > solution than Ghost. Acronis allows you to do scheduled back ups
> > which is also a plus. Ideally I want to set up the clone machine
> > next to the older machine. Plug them both into the network and have
> > the new machine backing up the old once a week or every day.
>
> TrueImage is a great program.
> Incremental backups, scheduling, Linux filesystem support, and native
> "Network Neighborhood" support are a few of my favorite features.
>
> The only place you might run into a snag is that since the recovery CD
> is Linux-based, you might have trouble if you have some hardware which
> isn't supported by Linux.
>
> I question your "cloning" backup strategy, though. First, cloning is
> intended for use between drives in a single machine. Even if you could
> get some way to clone across machines, the hardware would need to be
> pretty much the same between the machines. And I'm sure you'll
> probably run into licensing/activation issues with XP if that's your OS.
>
> Wouldn't it make more sense to do an "Image" backup. That way you can
> take advantage of the scheduling, incremental, and other features of
> TrueImage. Plus you can keep multiple levels of backups, depending on
> your storage availability and backup needs. Heck, you can even
> dispense with the whole older machine. Save on power costs, if that's
> all that you'd be using it for. Just get an external USB2 or Firewire
> drive. (Or even a spare internal drive)
>
>
> -WD

How do I get it to the new machine? You say dispense with the older
machine. ???

I talked to Dell and they said that cloning from the old HP Pavilion
to the new Dell 400 SC will not work because of the hardware
differences. I am running NT 4.0 SP 6.

Acronis says:

"If the new machine hardware configuration differs from the old one,
than you should use sysprep utility before backup creation.

Please read the following article:
http://www.acronis.com/products/trueimage/faq.html#17"
July 23, 2004 11:57:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

Learn to read first off.

"Bobby Fischler" <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote in message
news:ae681794.0407231545.6301b84@posting.google.com...
> Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
news:<9kood0pgbhjts24e5535p4lidltrebmhff@4ax.com>...
> > On 24 Jun 2004 14:10:47 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
> > wrote:
> >
> > >The old machine has NT 4.0 SP 6. I would prefer to upgrade but I
> > >really don't want to touch the old machine. It has on the front a
> > >serial pot and USB 1.1. (which NT does not support).
> >
> > There's a very good chance the True Image boot disk will recognize
> > your USB1.1 port and allow you to make a non-invasive backup from
> > this. I've done this several times on systems with old OS's. Power
> > down, plug in the external USB drive, boot to the TI cd or floppies,
> > and back up directly to the external drive. Slow, compared to USB2,
> > but very low risk.
>
>
> This sounds stupid but do I load Acronis True Image 7.0 on the old
> machine or do I just use the True Image boot disk that I made?
>
> Do I "back up" or run the True Image "disk clone" or "create image."
>
> Thanks for your help.
>
>
> Once I have the Image (backup) on the Western Digital external - I
> want to open the Pavilion and put and second drive in and image that.
>
> Finally, I will remove the new Dell machines drive and plug it in to
> image.
> I will then put it in the Dell and hope it boots. Acronis suggests
> going to MSFT and has some suggestions on making it work on different
> hardware.
>
> I may also call Dell to see if they will come out to do imaging.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 24, 2004 4:47:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

"doS" <kobo65@hotNOTSOmail.com> wrote in message news:<10g39el4ivuqa3e@corp.supernews.com>...
> Learn to read first off.
>
> "Bobby Fischler" <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote in message
> news:ae681794.0407231545.6301b84@posting.google.com...
> > Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
> news:<9kood0pgbhjts24e5535p4lidltrebmhff@4ax.com>...
> > > On 24 Jun 2004 14:10:47 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > > >The old machine has NT 4.0 SP 6. I would prefer to upgrade but I
> > > >really don't want to touch the old machine. It has on the front a
> > > >serial pot and USB 1.1. (which NT does not support).
> > >
> > > There's a very good chance the True Image boot disk will recognize
> > > your USB1.1 port and allow you to make a non-invasive backup from
> > > this. I've done this several times on systems with old OS's. Power
> > > down, plug in the external USB drive, boot to the TI cd or floppies,
> > > and back up directly to the external drive. Slow, compared to USB2,
> > > but very low risk.
> >
> >
> > This sounds stupid but do I load Acronis True Image 7.0 on the old
> > machine or do I just use the True Image boot disk that I made?
> >
> > Do I "back up" or run the True Image "disk clone" or "create image."
> >
> > Thanks for your help.
> >
> >
> > Once I have the Image (backup) on the Western Digital external - I
> > want to open the Pavilion and put and second drive in and image that.
> >
> > Finally, I will remove the new Dell machines drive and plug it in to
> > image.
> > I will then put it in the Dell and hope it boots. Acronis suggests
> > going to MSFT and has some suggestions on making it work on different
> > hardware.
> >
> > I may also call Dell to see if they will come out to do imaging.

Thanks for the non help. I am lerry about putting True Image 7.0 on
the old machine as I don't want any regsitries changed. I doubt TI
7.0 will do that but if I can use the boot disk it would be better. I
loaded Nero on another machine once and it fouled up the registries.
July 24, 2004 9:19:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

"Bobby Fischler" <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote in message
news:ae681794.0407241147.2b2b9d4f@posting.google.com...
> "doS" <kobo65@hotNOTSOmail.com> wrote in message
news:<10g39el4ivuqa3e@corp.supernews.com>...
> > Learn to read first off.
> >
> > "Bobby Fischler" <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote in message
> > news:ae681794.0407231545.6301b84@posting.google.com...
> > > Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
> > news:<9kood0pgbhjts24e5535p4lidltrebmhff@4ax.com>...
> > > > On 24 Jun 2004 14:10:47 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
> > > > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > >The old machine has NT 4.0 SP 6. I would prefer to upgrade but I
> > > > >really don't want to touch the old machine. It has on the front a
> > > > >serial pot and USB 1.1. (which NT does not support).
> > > >
> > > > There's a very good chance the True Image boot disk will recognize
> > > > your USB1.1 port and allow you to make a non-invasive backup from
> > > > this. I've done this several times on systems with old OS's. Power
> > > > down, plug in the external USB drive, boot to the TI cd or floppies,
> > > > and back up directly to the external drive. Slow, compared to USB2,
> > > > but very low risk.
> > >
> > >
> > > This sounds stupid but do I load Acronis True Image 7.0 on the old
> > > machine or do I just use the True Image boot disk that I made?
> > >
> > > Do I "back up" or run the True Image "disk clone" or "create image."
> > >
> > > Thanks for your help.
> > >
> > >
> > > Once I have the Image (backup) on the Western Digital external - I
> > > want to open the Pavilion and put and second drive in and image that.
> > >
> > > Finally, I will remove the new Dell machines drive and plug it in to
> > > image.
> > > I will then put it in the Dell and hope it boots. Acronis suggests
> > > going to MSFT and has some suggestions on making it work on different
> > > hardware.
> > >
> > > I may also call Dell to see if they will come out to do imaging.
>
> Thanks for the non help. I am lerry about putting True Image 7.0 on
> the old machine as I don't want any regsitries changed.

Anytime you install a program, the registry changes.


I doubt TI
> 7.0 will do that but if I can use the boot disk it would be better.

Ok, but wouldn't you have to install TI on the machine to create the
bootdisk...

I
> loaded Nero on another machine once and it fouled up the registries.

I doubt Nero fouled up anything. Make sure the machine meets the
requirements.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 24, 2004 10:49:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

In article <ae681794.0407241147.2b2b9d4f@posting.google.com>,
Bobby Fischler <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote:
>"doS" <kobo65@hotNOTSOmail.com> wrote in message news:<10g39el4ivuqa3e@corp.supernews.com>...
>> Learn to read first off.
>>
>> "Bobby Fischler" <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote in message
>> news:ae681794.0407231545.6301b84@posting.google.com...
>> > Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
>> news:<9kood0pgbhjts24e5535p4lidltrebmhff@4ax.com>...
>> > > On 24 Jun 2004 14:10:47 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
>> > > wrote:
>> > >
>> > > >The old machine has NT 4.0 SP 6. I would prefer to upgrade but I
>> > > >really don't want to touch the old machine. It has on the front a
>> > > >serial pot and USB 1.1. (which NT does not support).
>> > >
>> > > There's a very good chance the True Image boot disk will recognize
>> > > your USB1.1 port and allow you to make a non-invasive backup from
>> > > this. I've done this several times on systems with old OS's. Power
>> > > down, plug in the external USB drive, boot to the TI cd or floppies,
>> > > and back up directly to the external drive. Slow, compared to USB2,
>> > > but very low risk.
>> >
>> >
>> > This sounds stupid but do I load Acronis True Image 7.0 on the old
>> > machine or do I just use the True Image boot disk that I made?
>> >
>> > Do I "back up" or run the True Image "disk clone" or "create image."
>> >
>> > Thanks for your help.
>> >
>> >
>> > Once I have the Image (backup) on the Western Digital external - I
>> > want to open the Pavilion and put and second drive in and image that.
>> >
>> > Finally, I will remove the new Dell machines drive and plug it in to
>> > image.
>> > I will then put it in the Dell and hope it boots. Acronis suggests
>> > going to MSFT and has some suggestions on making it work on different
>> > hardware.
>> >
>> > I may also call Dell to see if they will come out to do imaging.
>
>Thanks for the non help. I am lerry about putting True Image 7.0 on
>the old machine as I don't want any regsitries changed. I doubt TI
>7.0 will do that but if I can use the boot disk it would be better. I
>loaded Nero on another machine once and it fouled up the registries.


If you boot TI from the CD it's not going to make ANY changes to
the disk. With luck it will recognize your ethernet card and you
will be able to image to another machine, or if you have two disks
you can image from one to the other.



--
Al Dykes
-----------
adykes at p a n i x . c o m
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 26, 2004 1:32:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

On 24 Jul 2004 18:49:21 -0400, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

>If you boot TI from the CD it's not going to make ANY changes to
>the disk. With luck it will recognize your ethernet card and you
>will be able to image to another machine, or if you have two disks
>you can image from one to the other.

Yes, if you want to be 100% non-invasive, imaging from the boot disk
will do it. If it won't go across the 'net, a USB external drive
provides the lowest-risk backup.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 26, 2004 10:18:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message news:<kccag0l7cm8o4ivln6oc81u9fobo1q20sh@4ax.com>...
> On 24 Jul 2004 18:49:21 -0400, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:
>
> >If you boot TI from the CD it's not going to make ANY changes to
> >the disk. With luck it will recognize your ethernet card and you
> >will be able to image to another machine, or if you have two disks
> >you can image from one to the other.
>
> Yes, if you want to be 100% non-invasive, imaging from the boot disk
> will do it. If it won't go across the 'net, a USB external drive
> provides the lowest-risk backup.

Thanks. Sorry if I bothered others.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 27, 2004 12:24:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

"Neil Maxwell" <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
news:kccag0l7cm8o4ivln6oc81u9fobo1q20sh@4ax.com...
> On 24 Jul 2004 18:49:21 -0400, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:
>
> >If you boot TI from the CD it's not going to make ANY changes to
> >the disk. With luck it will recognize your ethernet card and you
> >will be able to image to another machine, or if you have two disks
> >you can image from one to the other.
>
> Yes, if you want to be 100% non-invasive, imaging from the boot disk
> will do it. If it won't go across the 'net, a USB external drive
> provides the lowest-risk backup.

OR an SATA drive in a removable tray.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 27, 2004 1:58:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:24:33 GMT, "Ron Reaugh"
<ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote:

>
>"Neil Maxwell" <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
>news:kccag0l7cm8o4ivln6oc81u9fobo1q20sh@4ax.com...
>> On 24 Jul 2004 18:49:21 -0400, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:
>>
>> >If you boot TI from the CD it's not going to make ANY changes to
>> >the disk. With luck it will recognize your ethernet card and you
>> >will be able to image to another machine, or if you have two disks
>> >you can image from one to the other.
>>
>> Yes, if you want to be 100% non-invasive, imaging from the boot disk
>> will do it. If it won't go across the 'net, a USB external drive
>> provides the lowest-risk backup.
>
>OR an SATA drive in a removable tray.

They've had some issues with SATA drives, though they're releasing an
updated version that they claim will clear up some of the problems. I
don't run SATA, so I have no first-hand experience, but it's been a
common question on their support board. I believe the odds of success
are better with USB or FW.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 27, 2004 5:09:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

In article <t82dg0t9udggqc8130901rn4clc4nu8jo0@4ax.com>,
Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote:
>On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:24:33 GMT, "Ron Reaugh"
><ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Neil Maxwell" <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
>>news:kccag0l7cm8o4ivln6oc81u9fobo1q20sh@4ax.com...
>>> On 24 Jul 2004 18:49:21 -0400, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:
>>>
>>> >If you boot TI from the CD it's not going to make ANY changes to
>>> >the disk. With luck it will recognize your ethernet card and you
>>> >will be able to image to another machine, or if you have two disks
>>> >you can image from one to the other.
>>>
>>> Yes, if you want to be 100% non-invasive, imaging from the boot disk
>>> will do it. If it won't go across the 'net, a USB external drive
>>> provides the lowest-risk backup.
>>
>>OR an SATA drive in a removable tray.
>
>They've had some issues with SATA drives, though they're releasing an
>updated version that they claim will clear up some of the problems. I
>don't run SATA, so I have no first-hand experience, but it's been a
>common question on their support board. I believe the odds of success
>are better with USB or FW.
>
>
>--
>Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer


I've had zero luck so far trying to burn a TI image to a USB-connected
CD from the the boot disk.

I haven't tried from XP but since burning 10 CDs to backup my machine
isn't much fun, and I don't trust CDs, anyway, I set myself up to
backup all my machines to a 160B disk in one desktop. I back the
decktop's C drive to that disk, also. I can keep a couple generations
of 3 machines on this disk. High compression is great.

I've sucessfully restored over ethernet and disk-to-disk
from the TI boot CD.






--
Al Dykes
-----------
adykes at p a n i x . c o m
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 27, 2004 6:49:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

On 27 Jul 2004 13:09:26 -0400, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

>I've had zero luck so far trying to burn a TI image to a USB-connected
>CD from the the boot disk.

If you want to determine if it's the USB controller or the CD that's
the problem, you could connect a USB HD to the same port and see if it
recognizes it. It's handled all the various USB and FW controllers
I've tried, but I haven't attempted to go direct to CD or DVD. I've
had more luck with Ghost burning direct to CD, but it has enough other
drawbacks that I don't use it.

>I haven't tried from XP but since burning 10 CDs to backup my machine
>isn't much fun, and I don't trust CDs, anyway, I set myself up to
>backup all my machines to a 160B disk in one desktop. I back the
>decktop's C drive to that disk, also. I can keep a couple generations
>of 3 machines on this disk. High compression is great.

DVD burners are getting cheap now, and help that a lot. The long-term
lifetimes of CD and DVD are not reliable, but for multi-generation
short-term backups, the risk is pretty low. Still, using a HD makes
everything much simpler and more transparent.

My preference is to burn backups to another HD, like you do, and limit
them to 4.5G, then copy those to DVD now and again to have an off-disk
backup.

>I've sucessfully restored over ethernet and disk-to-disk
>from the TI boot CD.

Yep, it's pretty durn effective with supported hardware. I'm a
convert.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 27, 2004 7:14:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

On 27 Jul 2004 13:09:26 -0400, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

>I've had zero luck so far trying to burn a TI image to a USB-connected
>CD from the the boot disk.

Hmm... Interestingly, their new updated release is now TI8. Not much
detail on their web about the differences; many of the docs are
search-and-replace TI7 conversions.

It allows exclusion of hibernate and paging files and changing of the
process priority, as well as having better built-in verification.

I'll let the early adopters run it around a bit first.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 27, 2004 11:48:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message news:<dih0e0la8oal13rahrmihs2dr5or4q7s9r@4ax.com>...
> On 25 Jun 2004 15:57:20 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
> wrote:
>
> >I have bought the software and need to get an external drive. Anyone
> >have any preferences? Office Depot has a Maxtor 120 gb for about
> >$154.
>
> I buy most of my hardware from www.newegg.com these days, but there's
> a lot to be said for a local vendor if there's not a big price
> difference. Returns are much quicker and easier, if necessary.


I able able to use the TI 7.0 boot disk and NT/Acronis see the WD 120
Gig external (E) drive plugged into the 1.1 USB.


1. I select Disk Clone in TI 7.0.
2. TI sees the internal drives on the Old HP and sees the WD External.

3. It says I have some partitions on the WD external - it is brand
new. Says it has to wipe them to proceed. No problem because the ext
drive is empty.

4. I get to the final step. Has the Source and Target selected
correctly. It asks me 3 choices. Wipe the old drive, make some
changes (??) or leave source alone. I obviously want to leave the C
source drive alone but it mentions that by leaving alone I can store
the old drive like put it in a box??? I just want to copy the data
from the C Pavilion drive to the E WD External. I don't want to
disturb the C at all. Comments?

I want an exact clone on the external. Once I have that I will open
the old HP Pavilion and put in a second Internal and back that up too.

Am I doing it right or do I want to "Create an Image."


Also: Western Digital says be extra careful when unplugging the
External from the machine. It says use the XP "Eject Hardware" icon.
NT 4.0 SP 6 does not have such an icon. Do I power down the HP
machine then power down the external drive and then unplug and unplug
the USB?

Anyone know if Acronis will let me pay them $40 a hour or something to
walk me through for 10 minutes?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 28, 2004 12:06:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

"Neil Maxwell" <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
news:t82dg0t9udggqc8130901rn4clc4nu8jo0@4ax.com...
> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:24:33 GMT, "Ron Reaugh"
> <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Neil Maxwell" <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
> >news:kccag0l7cm8o4ivln6oc81u9fobo1q20sh@4ax.com...
> >> On 24 Jul 2004 18:49:21 -0400, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:
> >>
> >> >If you boot TI from the CD it's not going to make ANY changes to
> >> >the disk. With luck it will recognize your ethernet card and you
> >> >will be able to image to another machine, or if you have two disks
> >> >you can image from one to the other.
> >>
> >> Yes, if you want to be 100% non-invasive, imaging from the boot disk
> >> will do it. If it won't go across the 'net, a USB external drive
> >> provides the lowest-risk backup.
> >
> >OR an SATA drive in a removable tray.
>
> They've had some issues with SATA drives,

Who says and don't cite that tiny discredited website that has NO
substantiation?

>though they're releasing an
> updated version that they claim will clear up some of the problems.

Nonsense. Who is they?

> I
> don't run SATA, so I have no first-hand experience,

Didn't think so.

>but it's been a
> common question on their support board. I believe the odds of success
> are better with USB or FW.

Clueless.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 28, 2004 2:59:31 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

In article <ae681794.0407271848.37d9ce09@posting.google.com>,
Bobby Fischler <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote:
>Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message news:<dih0e0la8oal13rahrmihs2dr5or4q7s9r@4ax.com>...
>> On 25 Jun 2004 15:57:20 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
>> wrote:
>>
>> >I have bought the software and need to get an external drive. Anyone
>> >have any preferences? Office Depot has a Maxtor 120 gb for about
>> >$154.
>>
>> I buy most of my hardware from www.newegg.com these days, but there's
>> a lot to be said for a local vendor if there's not a big price
>> difference. Returns are much quicker and easier, if necessary.
>
>
>I able able to use the TI 7.0 boot disk and NT/Acronis see the WD 120
>Gig external (E) drive plugged into the 1.1 USB.
>
>
>1. I select Disk Clone in TI 7.0.
>2. TI sees the internal drives on the Old HP and sees the WD External.
>
>3. It says I have some partitions on the WD external - it is brand
>new. Says it has to wipe them to proceed. No problem because the ext
>drive is empty.
>
>4. I get to the final step. Has the Source and Target selected
>correctly. It asks me 3 choices. Wipe the old drive, make some
>changes (??) or leave source alone. I obviously want to leave the C
>source drive alone but it mentions that by leaving alone I can store
>the old drive like put it in a box??? I just want to copy the data
>from the C Pavilion drive to the E WD External. I don't want to
>disturb the C at all. Comments?
>
>I want an exact clone on the external. Once I have that I will open
>the old HP Pavilion and put in a second Internal and back that up too.
>
>Am I doing it right or do I want to "Create an Image."
>
>
>Also: Western Digital says be extra careful when unplugging the
>External from the machine. It says use the XP "Eject Hardware" icon.
> NT 4.0 SP 6 does not have such an icon. Do I power down the HP
>machine then power down the external drive and then unplug and unplug
>the USB?
>
>Anyone know if Acronis will let me pay them $40 a hour or something to
>walk me through for 10 minutes?

Gack!!! Nt40 (Actually NT40 did lots of good work for me.)

Maybe the old hardware you're running has USB problems. I can't
believe it's USB2 and In my experience USB1 runs at about
1 MB/sec.

I've lost track of our goal here. Is it to migrate data to anothe r
machine or to do backups, or something else.

I'd put the 120GB disk on an IDE controller in the machine
and boot TI and image your machine that way.

Try plugging your USB/120GB disk into the newest machine
you can get your hands on and see if you can boot TI
and image the C drive.

--
Al Dykes
-----------
adykes at p a n i x . c o m
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 28, 2004 2:48:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

My WD hard drive came with a cd-rom of utilities that includes
copying lots of files from the old HD to the new HD, including
cloning the old one if you want to make the new HD your boot drive.

If you didn't get any utilities in the box, contact your customer support
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 29, 2004 1:21:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

"Bobby Fischler" <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote in message
news:ae681794.0407271848.37d9ce09@posting.google.com...
> Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
news:<dih0e0la8oal13rahrmihs2dr5or4q7s9r@4ax.com>...
> > On 25 Jun 2004 15:57:20 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
> > wrote:
> >
> > >I have bought the software and need to get an external drive. Anyone
> > >have any preferences? Office Depot has a Maxtor 120 gb for about
> > >$154.
> >
> > I buy most of my hardware from www.newegg.com these days, but there's
> > a lot to be said for a local vendor if there's not a big price
> > difference. Returns are much quicker and easier, if necessary.
>
>
> I able able to use the TI 7.0 boot disk and NT/Acronis see the WD 120
> Gig external (E) drive plugged into the 1.1 USB.
>
>
> 1. I select Disk Clone in TI 7.0.
> 2. TI sees the internal drives on the Old HP and sees the WD External.
>
> 3. It says I have some partitions on the WD external - it is brand
> new. Says it has to wipe them to proceed. No problem because the ext
> drive is empty.
>
> 4. I get to the final step. Has the Source and Target selected
> correctly. It asks me 3 choices. Wipe the old drive, make some
> changes (??) or leave source alone. I obviously want to leave the C
> source drive alone but it mentions that by leaving alone I can store
> the old drive like put it in a box??? I just want to copy the data
> from the C Pavilion drive to the E WD External. I don't want to
> disturb the C at all. Comments?
>
> I want an exact clone on the external. Once I have that I will open
> the old HP Pavilion and put in a second Internal and back that up too.
>
> Am I doing it right or do I want to "Create an Image."
>
>
> Also: Western Digital says be extra careful when unplugging the
> External from the machine. It says use the XP "Eject Hardware" icon.
> NT 4.0 SP 6 does not have such an icon. Do I power down the HP
> machine then power down the external drive and then unplug and unplug
> the USB?
>
> Anyone know if Acronis will let me pay them $40 a hour or something to
> walk me through for 10 minutes?
Where did you get USB driver for NT4? USB1.1 will take AGES! Why can't you
just plug in extra IDE drive and clone to that?
Mike.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 29, 2004 1:21:46 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

In article <41080a8d_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com>,
Michael Hawes <michael.hawes1remove@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
>
>"Bobby Fischler" <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote in message
>news:ae681794.0407271848.37d9ce09@posting.google.com...
>> Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message
>news:<dih0e0la8oal13rahrmihs2dr5or4q7s9r@4ax.com>...
>> > On 25 Jun 2004 15:57:20 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> > >I have bought the software and need to get an external drive. Anyone
>> > >have any preferences? Office Depot has a Maxtor 120 gb for about
>> > >$154.
>> >
>> > I buy most of my hardware from www.newegg.com these days, but there's
>> > a lot to be said for a local vendor if there's not a big price
>> > difference. Returns are much quicker and easier, if necessary.
>>
>>
>> I able able to use the TI 7.0 boot disk and NT/Acronis see the WD 120
>> Gig external (E) drive plugged into the 1.1 USB.
>>
>>
>> 1. I select Disk Clone in TI 7.0.
>> 2. TI sees the internal drives on the Old HP and sees the WD External.
>>
>> 3. It says I have some partitions on the WD external - it is brand
>> new. Says it has to wipe them to proceed. No problem because the ext
>> drive is empty.
>>
>> 4. I get to the final step. Has the Source and Target selected
>> correctly. It asks me 3 choices. Wipe the old drive, make some
>> changes (??) or leave source alone. I obviously want to leave the C
>> source drive alone but it mentions that by leaving alone I can store
>> the old drive like put it in a box??? I just want to copy the data
>> from the C Pavilion drive to the E WD External. I don't want to
>> disturb the C at all. Comments?
>>
>> I want an exact clone on the external. Once I have that I will open
>> the old HP Pavilion and put in a second Internal and back that up too.
>>
>> Am I doing it right or do I want to "Create an Image."
>>
>>
>> Also: Western Digital says be extra careful when unplugging the
>> External from the machine. It says use the XP "Eject Hardware" icon.
>> NT 4.0 SP 6 does not have such an icon. Do I power down the HP
>> machine then power down the external drive and then unplug and unplug
>> the USB?
>>
>> Anyone know if Acronis will let me pay them $40 a hour or something to
>> walk me through for 10 minutes?


>Where did you get USB driver for NT4? USB1.1 will take AGES! Why can't you
>just plug in extra IDE drive and clone to that?
> Mike.

He's booting the TI7 cdrom which is very modern software that
supports USB. NT4 is out of the loop. I agree
it'll be slow.


--
Al Dykes
-----------
adykes at p a n i x . c o m
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 29, 2004 5:07:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,24hoursupport.helpdesk (More info?)

adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote in message news:<ce74qj$6g1$1@panix3.panix.com>...
> In article <ae681794.0407271848.37d9ce09@posting.google.com>,
> Bobby Fischler <francishals@yahoo.co.nz> wrote:
> >Neil Maxwell <neil.maxwell@intel.com> wrote in message news:<dih0e0la8oal13rahrmihs2dr5or4q7s9r@4ax.com>...
> >> On 25 Jun 2004 15:57:20 -0700, frans_hals5@hotmail.com (FransHals)
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> >I have bought the software and need to get an external drive. Anyone
> >> >have any preferences? Office Depot has a Maxtor 120 gb for about
> >> >$154.
> >>
> >> I buy most of my hardware from www.newegg.com these days, but there's
> >> a lot to be said for a local vendor if there's not a big price
> >> difference. Returns are much quicker and easier, if necessary.
> >
> >
> >I able able to use the TI 7.0 boot disk and NT/Acronis see the WD 120
> >Gig external (E) drive plugged into the 1.1 USB.
> >
> >
> >1. I select Disk Clone in TI 7.0.
> >2. TI sees the internal drives on the Old HP and sees the WD External.
> >
> >3. It says I have some partitions on the WD external - it is brand
> >new. Says it has to wipe them to proceed. No problem because the ext
> >drive is empty.
> >
> >4. I get to the final step. Has the Source and Target selected
> >correctly. It asks me 3 choices. Wipe the old drive, make some
> >changes (??) or leave source alone. I obviously want to leave the C
> >source drive alone but it mentions that by leaving alone I can store
> >the old drive like put it in a box??? I just want to copy the data
> >from the C Pavilion drive to the E WD External. I don't want to
> >disturb the C at all. Comments?
> >
> >I want an exact clone on the external. Once I have that I will open
> >the old HP Pavilion and put in a second Internal and back that up too.
> >
> >Am I doing it right or do I want to "Create an Image."
> >
> >
> >Also: Western Digital says be extra careful when unplugging the
> >External from the machine. It says use the XP "Eject Hardware" icon.
> > NT 4.0 SP 6 does not have such an icon. Do I power down the HP
> >machine then power down the external drive and then unplug and unplug
> >the USB?
> >
> >Anyone know if Acronis will let me pay them $40 a hour or something to
> >walk me through for 10 minutes?
>
> Gack!!! Nt40 (Actually NT40 did lots of good work for me.)
>
> Maybe the old hardware you're running has USB problems. I can't
> believe it's USB2 and In my experience USB1 runs at about
> 1 MB/sec.
>
> I've lost track of our goal here. Is it to migrate data to anothe r
> machine or to do backups, or something else.
>
> I'd put the 120GB disk on an IDE controller in the machine
> and boot TI and image your machine that way.
>
> Try plugging your USB/120GB disk into the newest machine
> you can get your hands on and see if you can boot TI
> and image the C drive.

Thanks for your patience and kindness.

I am all set on the USB 1.1.

I am trying to just make a back up copy/image to the external. My
goal is if the old machine or hard drive dies - I have the exact image
& settings. I want the old machine and hard drive to be left alone to
keep running.

I thought I wanted Disk Clone but I think I really want Create Image.
!