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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 4:31:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Hello,

I've got a few noisy IDE hard disks, and I would like to put them in a
room far away from where I work, along with a IDE controller and a
Ethernet controller.

A solution would be to throw away my hard disks and buy an external
Ethernet hard disk. However, I'm afraid that would be pretty
expensive...

Another solution would be to build a PC with Linux and Samba, and to
stuff the hard disks in there. Not too bad, especially since low-end
motherboards and CPUs are quite cheap.

But, is there another solution, like a machine designed especially for
that kind of use?

Thanks in advance...
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 4:31:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Fabien LE LEZ wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I've got a few noisy IDE hard disks, and I would like to put them in a
> room far away from where I work, along with a IDE controller and a
> Ethernet controller.
>
> A solution would be to throw away my hard disks and buy an external
> Ethernet hard disk. However, I'm afraid that would be pretty
> expensive...

Basically does the same thing you propose only with a canned solution.

> Another solution would be to build a PC with Linux and Samba, and to
> stuff the hard disks in there. Not too bad, especially since low-end
> motherboards and CPUs are quite cheap.
>
> But, is there another solution, like a machine designed especially for
> that kind of use?

It's called a "server". Some are sold as canned solutions as "network
attached storage", which is another name for an overpriced crippled server.

The cheap solution though would probably be to get a big quiet IDE drive and
replace your noisy old ones with it.

> Thanks in advance...

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
July 16, 2004 4:31:17 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

www.ximeta.com
(not my favourite solution)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:cd75qs01tt8@news1.newsguy.com...
> Fabien LE LEZ wrote:
>
> > Hello,
> >
> > I've got a few noisy IDE hard disks, and I would like to put them in a
> > room far away from where I work, along with a IDE controller and a
> > Ethernet controller.
> >
> > A solution would be to throw away my hard disks and buy an external
> > Ethernet hard disk. However, I'm afraid that would be pretty
> > expensive...
>
> Basically does the same thing you propose only with a canned solution.
>
> > Another solution would be to build a PC with Linux and Samba, and to
> > stuff the hard disks in there. Not too bad, especially since low-end
> > motherboards and CPUs are quite cheap.
> >
> > But, is there another solution, like a machine designed especially for
> > that kind of use?
>
> It's called a "server". Some are sold as canned solutions as "network
> attached storage", which is another name for an overpriced crippled
server.
>
> The cheap solution though would probably be to get a big quiet IDE drive
and
> replace your noisy old ones with it.
>
> > Thanks in advance...
>
> --
> --John
> Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Related resources
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 6:55:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 19:46:32 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid>:

>The cheap solution though would probably be to get a big quiet IDE drive and
>replace your noisy old ones with it.

Well, I've already got an ATX power supply, a Ethernet card and a
video card. I suppose that I can get a complete PC (w/o hard disks of
course) for $100 or so.
How much would 650 GB worth of quiet IDE drives would cost?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 6:55:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Fabien LE LEZ wrote:

> On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 19:46:32 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid>:
>
>>The cheap solution though would probably be to get a big quiet IDE drive
>>and replace your noisy old ones with it.
>
> Well, I've already got an ATX power supply, a Ethernet card and a
> video card. I suppose that I can get a complete PC (w/o hard disks of
> course) for $100 or so.
> How much would 650 GB worth of quiet IDE drives would cost?

Samsung 160s, which are some of the quietest drives on the market, are going
for about 93 bucks each so that would be $372. Hitachis, also quiet except
for a very soft periodic (like every couple or three hours) "catcall" on
recalibration, go for about the same. Seagates, which were the quietest at
one time, are a couple of bucks more. Western Digital has 250 gig FDB
drives for 190 each--that would give you 750 gig for 570, about the price
of a 120 gig NAS. Personally I'd probably spend a bit more and put in an
additional drive with RAID 5.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 6:55:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 02:55:09 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ
<gramster@gramster.com> wrote:

>How much would 650 GB worth of quiet IDE drives would cost?

Oh under $500 if you buy 2x 250GB and 1x 160GB. And you won't need a
top of the line CPU/mobo, you could dust off any first generation
Pentium.
--
To reply, replace digi.mon with tds.net
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 10:37:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 00:21:34 -0400, Impmon <impmon@digi.mon>:

>>How much would 650 GB worth of quiet IDE drives would cost?
>
>Oh under $500 if you buy 2x 250GB and 1x 160GB.

Still "a bit" more expensive than a low-end brand new PC ;-)

>And you won't need a
>top of the line CPU/mobo, you could dust off any first generation
>Pentium.

I won't get a decent transfert rate with an older Pentium.

I think I'll buy a Duron 1.2 GHz ($30 or so) and a low-end motherboard
($30 too). Add $15 for 128 MB RAM, and it's done :-)
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 10:39:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 19:46:32 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid>:

>The cheap solution though would probably be to get a big quiet IDE drive and
>replace your noisy old ones with it.

Well, it's definitely the most expensive solution. And, when I've
filled those disks up I'll have to carry on and buy (expensive) silent
disks, whereas with an external file server I'll be able to buy
noisy-and-cheap disks.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 10:39:21 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Fabien LE LEZ wrote:

> On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 19:46:32 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid>:
>
>>The cheap solution though would probably be to get a big quiet IDE drive
>>and replace your noisy old ones with it.
>
> Well, it's definitely the most expensive solution. And, when I've
> filled those disks up I'll have to carry on and buy (expensive) silent
> disks, whereas with an external file server I'll be able to buy
> noisy-and-cheap disks.

I'm sorry but (a) you're not going to be able to buy a machine with 650 gig
for less than that and (b) Samsung drives are both quiet and cheap.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 12:32:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 23:11:52 -0400, J. Clarke <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> Fabien LE LEZ wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 19:46:32 -0400, "J. Clarke"
>> <jclarke@nospam.invalid>:
>>
>>> The cheap solution though would probably be to get a big quiet IDE drive
>>> and replace your noisy old ones with it.
>>
>> Well, I've already got an ATX power supply, a Ethernet card and a
>> video card. I suppose that I can get a complete PC (w/o hard disks of
>> course) for $100 or so.
>> How much would 650 GB worth of quiet IDE drives would cost?
>
> Samsung 160s, which are some of the quietest drives on the market, are going
> for about 93 bucks each so that would be $372. Hitachis, also quiet except
> for a very soft periodic (like every couple or three hours) "catcall" on
> recalibration,

You have calmed my nerves slightly - is that what mine are doing? I thought of it as a "struggling squeaking noise", and assumed imminent death. It sounds to me like it is having difficulty doing something - although there is no delay in reading data at this point, and the PC appears happy.

> go for about the same. Seagates, which were the quietest at
> one time, are a couple of bucks more.

And very unreliable! Great idea - shove them in sponge to make them quiet, and don't let any heat out.


--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
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1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 12:55:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 06:37:11 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ
<gramster@gramster.com> wrote:

>On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 00:21:34 -0400, Impmon <impmon@digi.mon>:
>
>>>How much would 650 GB worth of quiet IDE drives would cost?
>>
>>Oh under $500 if you buy 2x 250GB and 1x 160GB.
>
>Still "a bit" more expensive than a low-end brand new PC ;-)

Well, the hard drive isn't free. For getting 650GB, around $500 is
what you would be spending.

>>And you won't need a
>>top of the line CPU/mobo, you could dust off any first generation
>>Pentium.
>
>I won't get a decent transfert rate with an older Pentium.

A 10/100 NIC and an ATA133 IDE card, the CPU wouldn't be doing that
much. But if you planned to use the extra PC for other things...

>I think I'll buy a Duron 1.2 GHz ($30 or so) and a low-end motherboard
>($30 too). Add $15 for 128 MB RAM, and it's done :-)

Just make sure the onboard IDE can support 48 bit hard drive or you
won't be able to use any hard drive bigger than 137GB.
--
To reply, replace digi.mon with tds.net
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 3:13:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 03:12:52 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid>:

>you're not going to be able to buy a machine with 650 gig
>for less than that

I wrote in my first message "I've got a few noisy IDE hard disks",
meaning I've already got the disks.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 16, 2004 3:13:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Fabien LE LEZ wrote:

> On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 03:12:52 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid>:
>
>>you're not going to be able to buy a machine with 650 gig
>>for less than that
>
> I wrote in my first message "I've got a few noisy IDE hard disks",
> meaning I've already got the disks.

Now, when you've moved your disks, what are you going to use to boot your
machine?

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 3:23:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 09:20:42 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid>:

>Now, when you've moved your disks, what are you going to use to boot your
>machine?

The easiest way: a small, silent hard disk. Maybe the best way, since
the PC will work even if the server stops.

Another possible way: a USB stick.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 3:35:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 08:55:41 -0400, Impmon <impmon@digi.mon>:

>>I think I'll buy a Duron 1.2 GHz ($30 or so) and a low-end motherboard
>>($30 too). Add $15 for 128 MB RAM, and it's done :-)
>
>Just make sure the onboard IDE can support 48 bit hard drive

Actually, I've already got a IDE PCI card.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 5:49:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 23:23:47 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:

> On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 09:20:42 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid>:
>
>> Now, when you've moved your disks, what are you going to use to boot your
>> machine?
>
> The easiest way: a small, silent hard disk. Maybe the best way, since
> the PC will work even if the server stops.
>
> Another possible way: a USB stick.

On the subject of silence, has anyone ever watercooled a PSU?


--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
93 silly video clips http://www.insanevideoclips.com
1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

Black holes are where God divided by zero.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 7:57:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 01:49:02 +0100, "Peter Hucker"
<hucker@clara.co.uk>:

>On the subject of silence, has anyone ever watercooled a PSU?

What's a PSU? A power-supply?

I was wondering about watercooling my PC a while ago, but I gave up
when I discovered Zalman products: for $80, I bought a
nearly-noiseless processor fan a power supply... and the noise from my
hard disks became a real problem ;-/
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 12:11:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 03:57:52 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:

> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 01:49:02 +0100, "Peter Hucker"
> <hucker@clara.co.uk>:
>
>> On the subject of silence, has anyone ever watercooled a PSU?
>
> What's a PSU? A power-supply?

Yes. Damn thing got too hot even with it's cover off, so I modified it to use two Zalman CPU water heatsinks connected to my reserator. Trouble is, those two, the two Athlon 2800+ CPUs, and the northbridge (also watercooled as it had a fan), makes the water temp quite high. I may put two reserators (the radiator part) in series! (Which would also cover me for water pump failure - although the Gigabyte motherbaord should cut the power if anything gets to 90C)

> I was wondering about watercooling my PC a while ago, but I gave up
> when I discovered Zalman products: for $80, I bought a
> nearly-noiseless processor fan a power supply... and the noise from my
> hard disks became a real problem ;-/

I've solved the hard disk problem. I have my tower case on its side (otherwise the height difference impedes the water flow from the small reserator water pump - especially to the power supply at the top, also a lot of things work better horizontally - graphics cards are cooled better, the heavy water-heatsinks are pushed onto the cpus by gravity, not pulled off). Anyway, I took the hard disks, put them in hard disk heatsinks (just a piece of copper a few mm thick surrounding the drive, plus some low profile heatisnk fins on one side), then HUNG them by string, vertically, in the 5.25" drive bay area. Hence - no vibration through to the case and/or floor. Both Seagate Barracudas and Hitachi Deskstars (both 7200rpm) make virtually no noise like this.


--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
93 silly video clips http://www.insanevideoclips.com
1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

Take notice: when this sign is under water, this road is impassable.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 12:37:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 08:55:41 -0400, Impmon <impmon@digi.mon>:

>Just make sure the onboard IDE can support 48 bit hard drive

BTW, do all modern motherboards (i.e. motherboard that you can buy
right now) support 48 bit hard drive?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 1:30:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:11:12 +0100, "Peter Hucker"
<hucker@clara.co.uk>:

>> What's a PSU? A power-supply?
>
>Yes. Damn thing got too hot even with it's cover off, so I modified
>it to use two Zalman CPU water heatsinks connected to my reserator.

Well, if you're rich enough, you can always buy a fanless PSU:

<http://www.silentmaxx.net/catalog/ps_prosilence_compari...;
<http://www.pcsilent.de/en_group_yesico_power_supplies.a...;

Zalman also offers quiet PSUs, but only up to 400W (which may not be
enough for you), and not perfectly silent.
<http://www.zalman.co.kr/eng/product/code_list.asp?code=...;
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 1:30:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 09:30:03 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:

> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:11:12 +0100, "Peter Hucker"
> <hucker@clara.co.uk>:
>
>>> What's a PSU? A power-supply?
>>
>> Yes. Damn thing got too hot even with it's cover off, so I modified
>> it to use two Zalman CPU water heatsinks connected to my reserator.
>
> Well, if you're rich enough, you can always buy a fanless PSU:
>
> <http://www.silentmaxx.net/catalog/ps_prosilence_compari...;
> <http://www.pcsilent.de/en_group_yesico_power_supplies.a...;

Well considering I have two zalman cpu heatsinks in there at 30 quid each, I may aswell.....

BLOODY HELL they are expensive!!! Thye shouldn't cost that.

> Zalman also offers quiet PSUs, but only up to 400W (which may not be
> enough for you), and not perfectly silent.
> <http://www.zalman.co.kr/eng/product/code_list.asp?code=...;

PERFECTION ONLY!

--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
93 silly video clips http://www.insanevideoclips.com
1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

TV takes over your life when you could be doing useful things like smoking crack and stealing car stereos.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 2:06:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 09:03:50 +0100, "Peter Hucker"
<hucker@clara.co.uk>:

>> Zalman also offers quiet PSUs, but only up to 400W (which may not be
>> enough for you), and not perfectly silent.
>> <http://www.zalman.co.kr/eng/product/code_list.asp?code=...;
>
>PERFECTION ONLY!

Is your water pump perfectly silent?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 17, 2004 10:11:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 10:06:40 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:

> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 09:03:50 +0100, "Peter Hucker"
> <hucker@clara.co.uk>:
>
>>> Zalman also offers quiet PSUs, but only up to 400W (which may not be
>>> enough for you), and not perfectly silent.
>>> <http://www.zalman.co.kr/eng/product/code_list.asp?code=...;
>>
>> PERFECTION ONLY!
>
> Is your water pump perfectly silent?

Put it this way, I can only hear it if I put my ear against it. The pump is underwater, inside the radiator, no noise gets out.


--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
93 silly video clips http://www.insanevideoclips.com
1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

What happens if you install windows 98 on a system with 2 processors?
It crashes twice.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 2:24:21 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:37:11 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:

> On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 08:55:41 -0400, Impmon <impmon@digi.mon>:
>
>> Just make sure the onboard IDE can support 48 bit hard drive
>
> BTW, do all modern motherboards (i.e. motherboard that you can buy
> right now) support 48 bit hard drive?

I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it won't do over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt everything when you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are 160GB aTA-100 - how is this possible?



--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
93 silly video clips http://www.insanevideoclips.com
1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

In the beginning, there was nothing, which exploded.
July 18, 2004 2:24:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Peter Hucker wrote:

> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:37:11 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ
> <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:
>
>> On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 08:55:41 -0400, Impmon <impmon@digi.mon>:
>>
>>> Just make sure the onboard IDE can support 48 bit hard drive
>>
>>
>> BTW, do all modern motherboards (i.e. motherboard that you can buy
>> right now) support 48 bit hard drive?
>
>
> I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
> ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it
> won't do over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt
> everything when you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are
> 160GB aTA-100 - how is this possible?
>
>
>

Don't confuse speed with addressing.

--
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 2:24:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

ATA-6 is a standard, which defines but does not require UDMA-133 and LBA-48.

"Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
news:o psbawevqraiowgp@blue...
I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it won't do
over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt everything when
you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are 160GB aTA-100 - how is
this possible?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 3:52:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 22:21:41 GMT, CJT <abujlehc@prodigy.net> wrote:

> Peter Hucker wrote:
>
>> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:37:11 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ
>> <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:
>>
>>> On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 08:55:41 -0400, Impmon <impmon@digi.mon>:
>>>
>>>> Just make sure the onboard IDE can support 48 bit hard drive
>>>
>>>
>>> BTW, do all modern motherboards (i.e. motherboard that you can buy
>>> right now) support 48 bit hard drive?
>>
>>
>> I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
>> ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it
>> won't do over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt
>> everything when you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are
>> 160GB aTA-100 - how is this possible?
>>
>>
>>
>
> Don't confuse speed with addressing.

So it's half an ATA133 standard? Will my board take 160s on the regular (non promise raid) controller?



--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
93 silly video clips http://www.insanevideoclips.com
1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

There are 10 kinds of people in the world: Those who understand binary, and those who don't.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 6:18:08 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 14:32:21 -0700, Eric Gisin <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:

> ATA-6 is a standard, which defines but does not require UDMA-133 and LBA-48.
>
> "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:o psbawevqraiowgp@blue...
> I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
> ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it won't do
> over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt everything when
> you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are 160GB aTA-100 - how is
> this possible?
>
>



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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 8:39:18 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 23:52:58 +0100, "Peter Hucker"
<hucker@clara.co.uk>:

>Will my board take 160s on the regular (non promise raid) controller?

You'll have to look in your manual for "48-bit", not the speed (133 vs
100).
Besides, I've got a few low-end recent PCs at work, and I still wonder
if they support 48-bit: I've plugged a Western Digital 250 GB (cut in
three NTFS partitions) on one of them, and the 3 partitions are well
recognized by Linux (which I used to read the files that were on it),
but not at all by Windows 2000 SP4 (the disk manager only sees one 128
GB partition).
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 12:02:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 04:39:18 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:

> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 23:52:58 +0100, "Peter Hucker"
> <hucker@clara.co.uk>:
>
>> Will my board take 160s on the regular (non promise raid) controller?
>
> You'll have to look in your manual for "48-bit", not the speed (133 vs
> 100).
> Besides, I've got a few low-end recent PCs at work, and I still wonder
> if they support 48-bit: I've plugged a Western Digital 250 GB (cut in
> three NTFS partitions) on one of them, and the 3 partitions are well
> recognized by Linux (which I used to read the files that were on it),
> but not at all by Windows 2000 SP4 (the disk manager only sees one 128
> GB partition).

I've had some old controllers report the disk as smaller than it is, some write over the wrong part fo the disk when they exceed 128GB, and some just don't work at all.


--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
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1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

Mary had a little skirt
With slits right up the sides
And everytime she crossed her legs
The boys could see her thighs

Mary had another skirt
With a slit right up the front
She never wore that one...
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 6:18:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psba68iylaiowgp@blue
> So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?

Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or 133 MB/s.

What do you think that it means?

>
> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 14:32:21 -0700, Eric Gisin <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:
>
> > ATA-6 is a standard, which defines but does not require UDMA-133 and LBA-48.

Actually, ATA-6 defines LBA-48 (end 2000) and ATA-7 defines
UDMA 133 (begin 2002). So there is at least a year between them.

> >
> > "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
> > news:o psbawevqraiowgp@blue...
> > I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
> > ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it won't do
> > over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt everything when
> > you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are 160GB aTA-100 - how is
> > this possible?

Let's put that around: why should that be impossible?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 6:18:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:21 +0200, Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl> wrote:

> "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psba68iylaiowgp@blue
>> So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
>
> Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
> To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or 133 MB/s.
>
> What do you think that it means?

It thought it also meant you can;t use anything over 128GB - so how do we know if the board does or not?

Maxtor invented ATA-133, and in it included the 48-bit model. It seems people are misadvertising again.

>> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 14:32:21 -0700, Eric Gisin <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:
>>
>> > ATA-6 is a standard, which defines but does not require UDMA-133 and LBA-48.
>
> Actually, ATA-6 defines LBA-48 (end 2000) and ATA-7 defines
> UDMA 133 (begin 2002). So there is at least a year between them.

As above, ATA-133 as specified by Maxtor states it can take large drives.

>> > "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
>> > news:o psbawevqraiowgp@blue...
>> > I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
>> > ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it won't do
>> > over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt everything when
>> > you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are 160GB aTA-100 - how is
>> > this possible?
>
> Let's put that around: why should that be impossible?

As above, ATA-133 as specified by Maxtor states it can take large drives.


--
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Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

The best parliament is a well-hung one?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 6:18:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
news:o psbb2qxuoaiowgp@blue...
> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:21 +0200, Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl>
wrote:
>
>>> So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
>>
>> Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
>> To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or
>> 133 MB/s.
>>
>> What do you think that it means?
>
> It thought it also meant you can;t use anything over 128GB - so how do we
know if the board does or not?
>
> Maxtor invented ATA-133, and in it included the 48-bit model. It seems
people are misadvertising again.
>
Nonsense. Both were independently invented, then included in ATA-6, the
standard.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 6:18:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psba0ikpgaiowgp@blue
> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 22:21:41 GMT, CJT <abujlehc@prodigy.net> wrote:
>
> > Peter Hucker wrote:
> >
> > > On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:37:11 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ
> > > <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > > On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 08:55:41 -0400, Impmon <impmon@digi.mon>:
> > > >
> > > > > Just make sure the onboard IDE can support 48 bit hard drive
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > BTW, do all modern motherboards (i.e. motherboard that you can buy
> > > > right now) support 48 bit hard drive?
> > >
> > >
> > > I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
> > > ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it
> > > won't do over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt
> > > everything when you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are
> > > 160GB aTA-100 - how is this possible?
> > >
> >
> > Don't confuse speed with addressing.
>
> So it's half an ATA133 standard?

What is half an ATA133 standard?

> Will my board take 160s on the regular (non promise raid) controller?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 6:18:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:34 +0200, Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl> wrote:

>
> "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psba0ikpgaiowgp@blue
>> On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 22:21:41 GMT, CJT <abujlehc@prodigy.net> wrote:
>>
>> > Peter Hucker wrote:
>> >
>> > > On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:37:11 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ
>> > > <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:
>> > >
>> > > > On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 08:55:41 -0400, Impmon <impmon@digi.mon>:
>> > > >
>> > > > > Just make sure the onboard IDE can support 48 bit hard drive
>> > > >
>> > > >
>> > > > BTW, do all modern motherboards (i.e. motherboard that you can buy
>> > > > right now) support 48 bit hard drive?
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
>> > > ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it
>> > > won't do over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt
>> > > everything when you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are
>> > > 160GB aTA-100 - how is this possible?
>> > >
>> >
>> > Don't confuse speed with addressing.
>>
>> So it's half an ATA133 standard?
>
> What is half an ATA133 standard?

Only the size but not the speed.


--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
93 silly video clips http://www.insanevideoclips.com
1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

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Through the skylight.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 7:10:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:21 +0200, "Folkert Rienstra"
<see_reply-to@myweb.nl>:

>> So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
>
>Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
>To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or 133 MB/s.

BTW, what's the difference between 100 and 133?
I mean, is there a situation where a 133 MBps IDE bus speed really
makes any program faster?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 7:22:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 15:10:35 +0200, Fabien LE LEZ <gramster@gramster.com> wrote:

> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:21 +0200, "Folkert Rienstra"
> <see_reply-to@myweb.nl>:
>
>>> So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
>>
>> Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
>> To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or 133 MB/s.
>
> BTW, what's the difference between 100 and 133?
> I mean, is there a situation where a 133 MBps IDE bus speed really
> makes any program faster?

No idea, but I've seen drives that quote an internal transfer speed of 95MB/s, so it's almost required so as not to limit the drive's ability.

--
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 18, 2004 9:25:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 08:43:59 -0700, Eric Gisin <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:

> "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:o psbb2qxuoaiowgp@blue...
>> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:21 +0200, Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl>
> wrote:
>>
>>>> So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
>>>
>>> Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
>>> To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or
>>> 133 MB/s.
>>>
>>> What do you think that it means?
>>
>> It thought it also meant you can;t use anything over 128GB - so how do we
> know if the board does or not?
>>
>> Maxtor invented ATA-133, and in it included the 48-bit model. It seems
> people are misadvertising again.
>>
> Nonsense. Both were independently invented, then included in ATA-6, the
> standard.

Not what I read on websites when it came out.

And every time I've bought a 133 controller, it'sa taken large drives over 128GB. 100 controllers always screw up when you fill the drive up.

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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2004 12:49:24 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Fabien LE LEZ" <gramster@gramster.com> wrote in message news:gitkf058m076gpnmu9qmbfhv5utnvm3h35@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:21 +0200, "Folkert Rienstra" <see_reply-to@myweb.nl>:
>
> >> So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
> >
> >Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
> >To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or 133 MB/s.
>
> BTW, what's the difference between 100 and 133?

33 MB/s difference?

> I mean, is there a situation where a 133 MBps IDE bus speed really
> makes any program faster?

No. Neither did any other increase in busspeed.

Why didn't you ask this question when we went from PIO-0 to PIO-1 to PIO-2 to ...
to MW-DMA-0 to DMA-1 to ..... to Ultra DMA mode 2 ... etc.

IDE Bus speed is increased every time that 2 drives on a channel can fill that channel.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2004 12:53:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psbcc8hj9aiowgp@blue...
> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 08:43:59 -0700, Eric Gisin <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:
> > "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psbb2qxuoaiowgp@blue...
> >> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:21 +0200, Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl> wrote:
> >>
> >>>> So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
> >>>
> >>> Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
> >>> To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or
> >>> 133 MB/s.
> >>>
> >>> What do you think that it means?
> >>
> >> It thought it also meant you can;t use anything over 128GB - so how do we
> > know if the board does or not?
> >>
> >> Maxtor invented ATA-133, and in it included the 48-bit model. It seems
> > people are misadvertising again.
> >>
> > Nonsense. Both were independently invented, then included in ATA-6, the
> > standard.
>
> Not what I read on websites when it came out.

And obviously the websites are correct and the standard is trash.

Live with parrots, become a parrot.

>
> And every time I've bought a 133 controller, it'sa taken large drives over 128GB.

> 100 controllers always screw up when you fill the drive up.

Utterly clueless.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2004 3:44:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Folkert Rienstra wrote:
>
> "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psba68iylaiowgp@blue
> > So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
>
> Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
> To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or 133 MB/s.
>
> What do you think that it means?
>
> >
> > On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 14:32:21 -0700, Eric Gisin <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:
> >
> > > ATA-6 is a standard, which defines but does not require UDMA-133 and LBA-48.
>
> Actually, ATA-6 defines LBA-48 (end 2000) and ATA-7 defines
> UDMA 133 (begin 2002). So there is at least a year between them.
>
> > >
> > > "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
> > > news:o psbawevqraiowgp@blue...
> > > I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
> > > ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it won't do
> > > over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt everything when
> > > you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are 160GB aTA-100 - how is
> > > this possible?
>
> Let's put that around: why should that be impossible?


Hello, Folkert:

Peter Hucker's cutesy signature lines are far more interesting, than
any of his "contributions" to this newsgroup; that's not really saying
anything, alas.


Cordially,
John Turco <jtur@concentric.net>
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2004 9:30:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 20:53:33 +0200, Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl> wrote:

>
> "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psbcc8hj9aiowgp@blue...
>> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 08:43:59 -0700, Eric Gisin <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:
>> > "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psbb2qxuoaiowgp@blue...
>> >> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:21 +0200, Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl> wrote:
>> >>
>> >>>> So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
>> >>>
>> >>> Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
>> >>> To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or
>> >>> 133 MB/s.
>> >>>
>> >>> What do you think that it means?
>> >>
>> >> It thought it also meant you can;t use anything over 128GB - so how do we
>> > know if the board does or not?
>> >>
>> >> Maxtor invented ATA-133, and in it included the 48-bit model. It seems
>> > people are misadvertising again.
>> >>
>> > Nonsense. Both were independently invented, then included in ATA-6, the
>> > standard.
>>
>> Not what I read on websites when it came out.
>
> And obviously the websites are correct and the standard is trash.

Maxtor lied?

> Live with parrots, become a parrot.

Cheap (oh dear) insults will get you nowhere you childish moron.

>> And every time I've bought a 133 controller, it'sa taken large drives over 128GB.
>
>> 100 controllers always screw up when you fill the drive up.
>
> Utterly clueless.

Utterly experience. What happened happened. Exceed 128GB, overwrites the first sector again.



--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
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1259 digital photos http://www.petersphotos.com
Served from a pentawatercooled dual silent Athlon 2.8 with terrabyte raid

Acupuncturists do it with a small prick.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2004 9:33:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On 18 Jul 2004 23:44:26 EDT, John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:

> Folkert Rienstra wrote:
>>
>> "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psba68iylaiowgp@blue
>> > So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
>>
>> Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
>> To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or 133 MB/s.
>>
>> What do you think that it means?
>>
>> >
>> > On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 14:32:21 -0700, Eric Gisin <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:
>> >
>> > > ATA-6 is a standard, which defines but does not require UDMA-133 and LBA-48.
>>
>> Actually, ATA-6 defines LBA-48 (end 2000) and ATA-7 defines
>> UDMA 133 (begin 2002). So there is at least a year between them.
>>
>> > >
>> > > "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
>> > > news:o psbawevqraiowgp@blue...
>> > > I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
>> > > ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it won't do
>> > > over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt everything when
>> > > you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are 160GB aTA-100 - how is
>> > > this possible?
>>
>> Let's put that around: why should that be impossible?
>
>
> Hello, Folkert:
>
> Peter Hucker's cutesy signature lines are far more interesting, than
> any of his "contributions" to this newsgroup; that's not really saying
> anything, alas.

Unusual, normally I get more complaints about the signatures. Wait till you spot a dodgy/rude/libellous/un-politically-correct/exceeding 4 lines one.



--
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2004 4:29:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
news:o psa7y72noaiowgp@blue...
> On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 23:11:52 -0400, J. Clarke <jclarke@nospam.invalid>
wrote:
>
> > Fabien LE LEZ wrote:
> >
> >> On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 19:46:32 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> >> <jclarke@nospam.invalid>:
> >>
> >>> The cheap solution though would probably be to get a big quiet IDE
drive
> >>> and replace your noisy old ones with it.
> >>
> >> Well, I've already got an ATX power supply, a Ethernet card and a
> >> video card. I suppose that I can get a complete PC (w/o hard disks of
> >> course) for $100 or so.
> >> How much would 650 GB worth of quiet IDE drives would cost?
> >
> > Samsung 160s, which are some of the quietest drives on the market, are
going
> > for about 93 bucks each so that would be $372. Hitachis, also quiet
except
> > for a very soft periodic (like every couple or three hours) "catcall" on
> > recalibration,
>
> You have calmed my nerves slightly - is that what mine are doing? I
thought of it as a "struggling squeaking noise", and assumed imminent death.
It sounds to me like it is having difficulty doing something - although
there is no delay in reading data at this point, and the PC appears happy.
>
> > go for about the same. Seagates, which were the quietest at
> > one time, are a couple of bucks more.
>
> And very unreliable! Great idea - shove them in sponge to make them
quiet, and don't let any heat out.
>
>

I think this works for many people..
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2004 5:16:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 12:29:25 GMT, rstlne <.@text.news.virgin.net> wrote:

>
> "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:o psa7y72noaiowgp@blue...
>> On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 23:11:52 -0400, J. Clarke <jclarke@nospam.invalid>
> wrote:
>>
>> > Fabien LE LEZ wrote:
>> >
>> >> On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 19:46:32 -0400, "J. Clarke"
>> >> <jclarke@nospam.invalid>:
>> >>
>> >>> The cheap solution though would probably be to get a big quiet IDE
> drive
>> >>> and replace your noisy old ones with it.
>> >>
>> >> Well, I've already got an ATX power supply, a Ethernet card and a
>> >> video card. I suppose that I can get a complete PC (w/o hard disks of
>> >> course) for $100 or so.
>> >> How much would 650 GB worth of quiet IDE drives would cost?
>> >
>> > Samsung 160s, which are some of the quietest drives on the market, are
> going
>> > for about 93 bucks each so that would be $372. Hitachis, also quiet
> except
>> > for a very soft periodic (like every couple or three hours) "catcall" on
>> > recalibration,
>>
>> You have calmed my nerves slightly - is that what mine are doing? I
> thought of it as a "struggling squeaking noise", and assumed imminent death.
> It sounds to me like it is having difficulty doing something - although
> there is no delay in reading data at this point, and the PC appears happy.
>>
>> > go for about the same. Seagates, which were the quietest at
>> > one time, are a couple of bucks more.
>>
>> And very unreliable! Great idea - shove them in sponge to make them
> quiet, and don't let any heat out.
>>
>>
>
> I think this works for many people..

People who live in Antarctica.



--
*****TWO BABY CONURES***** 15 parrots and increasing http://www.petersparrots.com
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2004 8:05:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> > I think this works for many people..
>
> People who live in Antarctica.
>
I have seen it where they have removed the HD from the case, fed the wires
through the back of the pc and then put it in a box, stack'd foam on top and
bottom and then taped the box up..
Fairly sure it wasnt in Antarctica.. I dont think it's a wise move but I
think that you could def do it if you bought the right kind of drives and
took care to make sure that it wasnt too hot.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2004 8:05:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

rstlne wrote:

>> > I think this works for many people..
>>
>> People who live in Antarctica.
>>
> I have seen it where they have removed the HD from the case, fed the wires
> through the back of the pc and then put it in a box, stack'd foam on top
> and bottom and then taped the box up..
> Fairly sure it wasnt in Antarctica.. I dont think it's a wise move but I
> think that you could def do it if you bought the right kind of drives and
> took care to make sure that it wasnt too hot.

Just remember, pick any brand of drive and someone will claim that in his
experience it is horribly unreliable. Simple fact is they all need clean
power, proper mounting, and adequate airflow.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 20, 2004 3:29:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psbb2qxuoaiowgp@blue
> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:18:21 +0200, Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl> wrote:
> > "Peter Hucker" <hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psba68iylaiowgp@blue
> > > So when a board says ATA-133 or ATA-100, this is meaningless?
> >
> > Obviously that depends on what you think it means.
> > To most people all it means is that the maximum IDE bus speed is 100 or 133 MB/s.
> >
> > What do you think that it means?
>
> It thought it also meant you can't use anything over 128GB - so how do we know if the board does or not?

We don't if they don't say.

>
> Maxtor invented ATA-133, and in it included the 48-bit model.

Nope. ATA133 is not a standard. It is part of a standard. So is 48-bit LBA.

LBA-48 was proposed to the ATA comittee for inclusion to the ATA/ATAPI-6 standard
by Pete McLean in September 2000.
Additions to ATA/ATAPI-7 for Ultra DMA mode 6 was proposed by Mark Evans in
September 2001
Both gentlemen happen to work for Maxtor, although I think mister Evans happened to
work for Quantum before that and Maxtor took over Quantum.

> It seems people are misadvertising again.

Yes, indeed you are.

>
> > > On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 14:32:21 -0700, Eric Gisin <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:
> > >
> > > > ATA-6 is a standard, which defines but does not require UDMA-133 and LBA-48.
> >
> > Actually, ATA-6 defines LBA-48 (end 2000) and ATA-7 defines
> > UDMA 133 (begin 2002). So there is at least a year between them.
>
> As above, ATA-133 as specified by Maxtor states it can take large drives.

Nope.

>
> > > > "Peter Hucker" hucker@clara.co.uk> wrote in message news:o psbawevqraiowgp@blue...
> > > > I see a lot (for example my Gigabyte dual athlon GA-7Dpxdw+) that have
> > > > ATA-100! Surely everything should be 133 by now? Does this mean it won't do
> > > > over 128GB? It is happy with a 160GB, but it may just corrupt everything when
> > > > you write past 128GB. Also, I've seen drives that are 160GB aTA-100 - how is
> > > > this possible?
> >
> > Let's put that around: why should that be impossible?
>
> As above, ATA-133 as specified by Maxtor states it can take large drives.

Clueless. Parrot lover, parrot brain.
!