External 5.25 inch floppy drive for computer?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

Is there some way I can connect a 5.25 inch floppy drive to a computer
so I can read my old floppy disks. I want to copy my old disks to CD.

I've heard of people using external cases that can contain a CD writer
or hard drive. Would I be able to put a 1.2 meg floppy drive in an
external case and connect it to usb or firewire port?

Regards Brian
23 answers Last reply
More about external inch floppy drive computer
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

    On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 00:04:20 +1200, Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:

    >Is there some way I can connect a 5.25 inch floppy drive to a computer
    >so I can read my old floppy disks. I want to copy my old disks to CD.

    There used to be external floppy drive but it used weird 37 pin
    connector and a floppy drive board with the connector port. Those
    pretty much went out when 3.5" drives became standard.

    >I've heard of people using external cases that can contain a CD writer
    >or hard drive. Would I be able to put a 1.2 meg floppy drive in an
    >external case and connect it to usb or firewire port?

    I don't think there are a way of getting external 5.25 drive to work
    on Firewire or USB without building custom interface. An used XT or
    286 with null modem cable might be far cheaper. Or cheaper yet, just
    plug an internal one in your current PC.
    --
    To reply, replace digi.mon with tds.net
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

    The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    only allow one floppy at a time.

    "Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:vnphg05m6rn0lem1v7e4pete18ue9hp08j@4ax.com...
    > Is there some way I can connect a 5.25 inch floppy drive to a computer
    > so I can read my old floppy disks. I want to copy my old disks to CD.
    >
    > I've heard of people using external cases that can contain a CD writer
    > or hard drive. Would I be able to put a 1.2 meg floppy drive in an
    > external case and connect it to usb or firewire port?
    >
    > Regards Brian
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

    Look in your BIOS if there is support for drive B, if so get a two-head cable.

    To use USB, you would need the bridge board from an external 3.5 floppy, and a
    5" enclosure. However, the bridge boards may be limited to 3.5.

    "Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:vnphg05m6rn0lem1v7e4pete18ue9hp08j@4ax.com...
    > Is there some way I can connect a 5.25 inch floppy drive to a computer
    > so I can read my old floppy disks. I want to copy my old disks to CD.
    >
    > I've heard of people using external cases that can contain a CD writer
    > or hard drive. Would I be able to put a 1.2 meg floppy drive in an
    > external case and connect it to usb or firewire port?
    >
    > Regards Brian
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

    "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

    >The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    >for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    >the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    >settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    >only allow one floppy at a time.
    >
    >"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >news:vnphg05m6rn0lem1v7e4pete18ue9hp08j@4ax.com...
    >> Is there some way I can connect a 5.25 inch floppy drive to a computer
    >> so I can read my old floppy disks. I want to copy my old disks to CD.
    >>
    >> I've heard of people using external cases that can contain a CD writer
    >> or hard drive. Would I be able to put a 1.2 meg floppy drive in an
    >> external case and connect it to usb or firewire port?
    >>
    >> Regards Brian

    I have a feeling last time I checked the 5.25 inch 1.2 meg drive it
    had a larger, or different type connection on the back of the drive
    compared to the 3.5 inch 1.44 meg drive.

    Regards Brian
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

    In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:
    > "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    >>The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    >>for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    >>the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    >>settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    >>only allow one floppy at a time.
    >>
    >>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>news:vnphg05m6rn0lem1v7e4pete18ue9hp08j@4ax.com...
    >>> Is there some way I can connect a 5.25 inch floppy drive to a computer
    >>> so I can read my old floppy disks. I want to copy my old disks to CD.
    >>>
    >>> I've heard of people using external cases that can contain a CD writer
    >>> or hard drive. Would I be able to put a 1.2 meg floppy drive in an
    >>> external case and connect it to usb or firewire port?
    >>>
    >>> Regards Brian
    >
    > I have a feeling last time I checked the 5.25 inch 1.2 meg drive it
    > had a larger, or different type connection on the back of the drive
    > compared to the 3.5 inch 1.44 meg drive.
    >
    > Regards Brian
    >
    You're right, 5.25" drive use a "card edge" connector, so you need to use
    a cable with a card-edge connector. Most cables have both types, but another
    solution is to use an adaptor from the card-edge connector to the male
    pins.

    A question: can't PCs accept at least 2 floppies A and B in their BIOS?
    If yours only accepts one, you could certainly plug in a floppy controller
    board. These are cheap and accept 2 drives, or even 4 drives if there are
    2 floppy connectors. If there is a conflict with the build-in controller,
    there must be a jumper or dip switch on the MB to disable it.

    Louis-Luc
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

    On Sat, 31 Jul 2004 00:42:10 +1200, Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:

    >I have a feeling last time I checked the 5.25 inch 1.2 meg drive it
    >had a larger, or different type connection on the back of the drive
    >compared to the 3.5 inch 1.44 meg drive.

    You're right. 3.5 used IDC while 5.25" used edge connector. Both can
    use the same floppy drive port on the mainboard.
    --
    To reply, replace digi.mon with tds.net
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

    In article <OYsOc.2404$aS.251@charlie.risq.qc.ca>, leguerri@canr.hydro.qc.ca wrote:
    >In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:
    >> "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    >>>for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    >>>the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    >>>settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    >>>only allow one floppy at a time.

    Many (all?) older machines were happy to regard a single physical
    drive as both A: and B:, so you could do various copying things from
    A: to B: without problems. You were simply prompted to "insert disk
    for drive d:" as appropriate. Don't modern machines allow this?

    >>>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>>news:vnphg05m6rn0lem1v7e4pete18ue9hp08j@4ax.com...
    >>>> Is there some way I can connect a 5.25 inch floppy drive to a computer
    >>>> so I can read my old floppy disks. I want to copy my old disks to CD.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've heard of people using external cases that can contain a CD writer
    >>>> or hard drive. Would I be able to put a 1.2 meg floppy drive in an
    >>>> external case and connect it to usb or firewire port?

    The first PC clone I owned (quite a few years ago) was a Logi XT. I
    wanted both 5.25" and the then new 3.5" 720 KB drives fitted. The
    latter couldn't be fitted as standard and had to be fitted as
    "external" (drive D: IIRC) even though physically installed in the
    usual floppy bay. I think it was simply connected as usual, but
    configured as "external" -- but I could be wrong about that.

    >> I have a feeling last time I checked the 5.25 inch 1.2 meg drive it
    >> had a larger, or different type connection on the back of the drive
    >> compared to the 3.5 inch 1.44 meg drive.
    >
    >You're right, 5.25" drive use a "card edge" connector, so you need to use
    >a cable with a card-edge connector. Most cables have both types, but another
    >solution is to use an adaptor from the card-edge connector to the male
    >pins.
    >
    >A question: can't PCs accept at least 2 floppies A and B in their BIOS?
    >If yours only accepts one, you could certainly plug in a floppy controller
    >board. These are cheap and accept 2 drives, or even 4 drives if there are
    >2 floppy connectors. If there is a conflict with the build-in controller,
    >there must be a jumper or dip switch on the MB to disable it.


    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Phred wrote:
    >
    > In article <OYsOc.2404$aS.251@charlie.risq.qc.ca>, leguerri@canr.hydro.qc.ca wrote:
    > >In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:
    > >> "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    > >>>for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    > >>>the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    > >>>settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    > >>>only allow one floppy at a time.
    >
    > Many (all?) older machines were happy to regard a single physical
    > drive as both A: and B:, so you could do various copying things from
    > A: to B: without problems. You were simply prompted to "insert disk
    > for drive d:" as appropriate. Don't modern machines allow this?

    <edited, for brevity>

    > Cheers, Phred.
    >
    > --
    > ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID


    Hello, Phred:

    My first computer was a Pionex 486DX2/66, purchased in 1995, since
    "retired." It came with both 5.25" and 3.5" high density floppies (A: &
    B:, respectively), installed; using the XCOPY command, in DOS, I could
    copy from one drive to the other.


    Cordially,
    John Turco <jtur@concentric.net>
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,aus.computers (More info?)

    In article <410DE2B9.A0DC3BAC@concentric.net>, John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:
    >Phred wrote:
    >> In article <OYsOc.2404$aS.251@charlie.risq.qc.ca>, leguerri@canr.hydro.qc.ca wrote:
    >> >In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:
    >> >> "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
    >> >>>The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    >> >>>for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    >> >>>the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    >> >>>settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    >> >>>only allow one floppy at a time.
    >>
    >> Many (all?) older machines were happy to regard a single physical
    >> drive as both A: and B:, so you could do various copying things from
    >> A: to B: without problems. You were simply prompted to "insert disk
    >> for drive d:" as appropriate. Don't modern machines allow this?
    ><edited, for brevity>

    >My first computer was a Pionex 486DX2/66, purchased in 1995, since
    >"retired." It came with both 5.25" and 3.5" high density floppies (A: &
    >B:, respectively), installed; using the XCOPY command, in DOS, I could
    >copy from one drive to the other.

    Yeah, I've known several such machines as it was my standard config
    since my 386SX-16 of some years ago (1*1.2MB and 1*1.44MB). But more
    recent machines have tended to be just 1*1.44MB plus 1*CD-R/CD-RW; and
    the very latest I've met (Dell 4600) has dropped the FDD as standard,
    though still available as an option.

    My original comment related to the ability of an early PC to see a
    single physical FDD as logically *both* A: and B: drives.

    Hmm... now you've got me intrigued! Hang on... Waddayano!
    Just tried DISKCOPY A: B: on this machine (Dell 4100, WinME, single
    1.44MB FDD) and it did the job okay BUT when it came to inserting the
    target disk it said to insert it in A:, which was a bit confusing.

    So then tried XCOPY A:\filename B: and got "Invalid file
    specification". So tried plain old DOS COPY and things then went a
    bit pear shaped:
    1. COPY picked up the file okay from A: and asked for a disk in B:
    2. Put disk in "B:" and got screen flash as DOS went to full screen!
    3. It then asked for disk in A: and checked it out.
    4. After a bit more of this A:/B: stuff at full screen it actually
    made the copy okay, but the process was less than convincing!
    I don't recommend this technique as it's a bit startling! AFAICS
    it would be more convenient, and confidence building, to go A:/C:/A:
    if you really needed to do this sort of thing on a modern PC.

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

    > Many (all?) older machines were happy to regard a single physical
    > drive as both A: and B:, so you could do various copying things from
    > A: to B: without problems. You were simply prompted to "insert disk
    > for drive d:" as appropriate. Don't modern machines allow this?
    >
    Any machine sees both A: and B: whether old or new.
    In DOS, the A: and B: are referred to the primary floppy connector on the
    primary floppy controller (the first one found during boot-up determined
    by BIOS address). Thus if there is only 1 floppy connected to that
    connector, it will be seen as both A: and B:. If there are other
    floppies on the system, they will need to be detected by the DOS DRIVER.SYS
    line in the CONFIG.SYS file with parameters, including the /d:x where x
    is the order of the drive. Thus 0 and 1 (which are A: and B:) are
    implicit. However, some more expensive controllers have a special BIOS
    that make drives (other than the A: and B:) natively detectable without
    any DOS drivers. In fact there is the MicroSolutions CompatiCard IV on
    which you select the type and position of up to 4 drives (on 2 connectors)
    using DIP switches on the card itself. That even overrides the definition
    in the PCs CMOS setup...

    So. On your XT, your A: drive was probably on the primary controller, alone
    on a cable, then you might have added that 3.5" drive with a separate
    controller board at a different address, and it was seen as an external
    drive (or secondary floppy bus) even though it was fitted internally. That's
    why the second drive was D: (and with pre 3.3 DOS, it came as C:, BEFORE
    any hard drive).

    Same with IBM PS/2s. In late 80s, they came with a 3.5" drive only. Many
    people ordered the external 5.25" 1.2M drive (in a nice casing with power
    supply and switch), but it was connected to a secondary controller via the
    DB37 connector at the back. You needed the DOS DRIVER.SYS loaded and it
    was seen as D: (or even E: or F: depending on other devices) and the 3.5"
    was both A: and B: just as if there were no other floppy.
    If you find that IBM drive, along with a controller w/DB37 external connector,
    you could surely fit this into a modern PC, assuming you have a free ISA
    slot.
    >>>>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>>>news:vnphg05m6rn0lem1v7e4pete18ue9hp08j@4ax.com...
    >>>>> Is there some way I can connect a 5.25 inch floppy drive to a computer
    >>>>> so I can read my old floppy disks. I want to copy my old disks to CD.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I've heard of people using external cases that can contain a CD writer
    >>>>> or hard drive. Would I be able to put a 1.2 meg floppy drive in an
    >>>>> external case and connect it to usb or firewire port?
    >
    > The first PC clone I owned (quite a few years ago) was a Logi XT. I
    > wanted both 5.25" and the then new 3.5" 720 KB drives fitted. The
    > latter couldn't be fitted as standard and had to be fitted as
    > "external" (drive D: IIRC) even though physically installed in the
    > usual floppy bay. I think it was simply connected as usual, but
    > configured as "external" -- but I could be wrong about that.
    >
    >>> I have a feeling last time I checked the 5.25 inch 1.2 meg drive it
    >>> had a larger, or different type connection on the back of the drive
    >>> compared to the 3.5 inch 1.44 meg drive.
    >>
    >>You're right, 5.25" drive use a "card edge" connector, so you need to use
    >>a cable with a card-edge connector. Most cables have both types, but another
    >>solution is to use an adaptor from the card-edge connector to the male
    >>pins.
    >>
    >>A question: can't PCs accept at least 2 floppies A and B in their BIOS?
    >>If yours only accepts one, you could certainly plug in a floppy controller
    >>board. These are cheap and accept 2 drives, or even 4 drives if there are
    >>2 floppy connectors. If there is a conflict with the build-in controller,
    >>there must be a jumper or dip switch on the MB to disable it.
    >
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    leguerri@canr.hydro.qc.ca wrote:
    >
    > > Many (all?) older machines were happy to regard a single physical
    > > drive as both A: and B:, so you could do various copying things from
    > > A: to B: without problems. You were simply prompted to "insert disk
    > > for drive d:" as appropriate. Don't modern machines allow this?
    > >
    > Any machine sees both A: and B: whether old or new.
    > In DOS, the A: and B: are referred to the primary floppy connector on the
    > primary floppy controller (the first one found during boot-up determined
    > by BIOS address). Thus if there is only 1 floppy connected to that
    > connector, it will be seen as both A: and B:. If there are other
    > floppies on the system, they will need to be detected by the DOS DRIVER.SYS
    > line in the CONFIG.SYS file with parameters, including the /d:x where x
    > is the order of the drive. Thus 0 and 1 (which are A: and B:) are
    > implicit. However, some more expensive controllers have a special BIOS
    > that make drives (other than the A: and B:) natively detectable without
    > any DOS drivers. In fact there is the MicroSolutions CompatiCard IV on
    > which you select the type and position of up to 4 drives (on 2 connectors)
    > using DIP switches on the card itself. That even overrides the definition
    > in the PCs CMOS setup...
    >
    > So. On your XT, your A: drive was probably on the primary controller, alone
    > on a cable, then you might have added that 3.5" drive with a separate
    > controller board at a different address, and it was seen as an external
    > drive (or secondary floppy bus) even though it was fitted internally. That's
    > why the second drive was D: (and with pre 3.3 DOS, it came as C:, BEFORE
    > any hard drive).
    >
    > Same with IBM PS/2s. In late 80s, they came with a 3.5" drive only. Many
    > people ordered the external 5.25" 1.2M drive (in a nice casing with power
    > supply and switch), but it was connected to a secondary controller via the
    > DB37 connector at the back. You needed the DOS DRIVER.SYS loaded and it
    > was seen as D: (or even E: or F: depending on other devices) and the 3.5"
    > was both A: and B: just as if there were no other floppy.
    > If you find that IBM drive, along with a controller w/DB37 external connector,
    > you could surely fit this into a modern PC, assuming you have a free ISA
    > slot.

    <cut text from previous messages, for brevity>

    Hello,

    Very interesting (and somewhat arcane) information, indeed! Except, this
    statement confuses me:

    >Thus if there is only 1 floppy connected to that
    > connector, it will be seen as both A: and B:.

    How can a single floppy be assigned two drive letters, anyway? (Besides,
    partitioning is reserved strictly for hard disks, so that "trick"
    couldn't work, either.)


    Cordially,
    John Turco <jtur@concentric.net>
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Phred wrote:
    >
    > In article <410DE2B9.A0DC3BAC@concentric.net>, John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:
    > >Phred wrote:
    > >> In article <OYsOc.2404$aS.251@charlie.risq.qc.ca>, leguerri@canr.hydro.qc.ca wrote:
    > >> >In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:
    > >> >> "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
    > >> >>>The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    > >> >>>for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    > >> >>>the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    > >> >>>settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    > >> >>>only allow one floppy at a time.
    > >>
    > >> Many (all?) older machines were happy to regard a single physical
    > >> drive as both A: and B:, so you could do various copying things from
    > >> A: to B: without problems. You were simply prompted to "insert disk
    > >> for drive d:" as appropriate. Don't modern machines allow this?
    > ><edited, for brevity>
    >
    > >My first computer was a Pionex 486DX2/66, purchased in 1995, since
    > >"retired." It came with both 5.25" and 3.5" high density floppies (A: &
    > >B:, respectively), installed; using the XCOPY command, in DOS, I could
    > >copy from one drive to the other.
    >
    > Yeah, I've known several such machines as it was my standard config
    > since my 386SX-16 of some years ago (1*1.2MB and 1*1.44MB). But more
    > recent machines have tended to be just 1*1.44MB plus 1*CD-R/CD-RW; and
    > the very latest I've met (Dell 4600) has dropped the FDD as standard,
    > though still available as an option.

    Hello, Phred:

    I've built two better PC's, such as my PIII 600MHz main system, and never
    bothered with a 5.25" floppy. Further, I replaced the Pionex's original
    Chinon drives with Teac models and made the 3.5" one, the boot device.
    (The hard-shelled 3.5" diskettes are far more rugged, than their flexible
    5.25" counterparts, which truly are, "floppy!")

    > My original comment related to the ability of an early PC to see a
    > single physical FDD as logically *both* A: and B: drives.

    Hmmm, wasn't aware of that.

    > Hmm... now you've got me intrigued! Hang on... Waddayano!
    > Just tried DISKCOPY A: B: on this machine (Dell 4100, WinME, single
    > 1.44MB FDD) and it did the job okay BUT when it came to inserting the
    > target disk it said to insert it in A:, which was a bit confusing.
    >
    > So then tried XCOPY A:\filename B: and got "Invalid file
    > specification". So tried plain old DOS COPY and things then went a
    > bit pear shaped:
    > 1. COPY picked up the file okay from A: and asked for a disk in B:
    > 2. Put disk in "B:" and got screen flash as DOS went to full screen!
    > 3. It then asked for disk in A: and checked it out.
    > 4. After a bit more of this A:/B: stuff at full screen it actually
    > made the copy okay, but the process was less than convincing!
    > I don't recommend this technique as it's a bit startling! AFAICS
    > it would be more convenient, and confidence building, to go A:/C:/A:
    > if you really needed to do this sort of thing on a modern PC.
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >
    > --
    > ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID

    Oh, I neglected to cite an important step, before. First, for everybody's
    benefit, is an example of the XCOPY command:

    XCOPY A: B: <enter>

    After the copy is executed, type the following:

    LABEL B:XXXXXXXX_X <enter>

    [Note: Substitute the source disk's (A:) "volume number," for
    XXXXXXXX_X, above. Also, <enter> simply means to press the "Enter" key.]

    Here's a Web page, explaining XCOPY in greater detail (including various
    "switches"):

    Commands - XCOPY
    http://home.earthlink.net/~rlively/MANUALS/COMMANDS/X/XCOPY.HTM#Diskcopy

    Good luck!


    Cordially,
    John Turco <jtur@concentric.net>
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:

    >Phred wrote:
    >>
    >> In article <410DE2B9.A0DC3BAC@concentric.net>, John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:
    >> >Phred wrote:
    >> >> In article <OYsOc.2404$aS.251@charlie.risq.qc.ca>, leguerri@canr.hydro.qc.ca wrote:
    >> >> >In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:
    >> >> >> "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
    >> >> >>>The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    >> >> >>>for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    >> >> >>>the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    >> >> >>>settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    >> >> >>>only allow one floppy at a time.
    >> >>
    >> >> Many (all?) older machines were happy to regard a single physical
    >> >> drive as both A: and B:, so you could do various copying things from
    >> >> A: to B: without problems. You were simply prompted to "insert disk
    >> >> for drive d:" as appropriate. Don't modern machines allow this?
    >> ><edited, for brevity>
    >>
    >> >My first computer was a Pionex 486DX2/66, purchased in 1995, since
    >> >"retired." It came with both 5.25" and 3.5" high density floppies (A: &
    >> >B:, respectively), installed; using the XCOPY command, in DOS, I could
    >> >copy from one drive to the other.
    >>
    >> Yeah, I've known several such machines as it was my standard config
    >> since my 386SX-16 of some years ago (1*1.2MB and 1*1.44MB). But more
    >> recent machines have tended to be just 1*1.44MB plus 1*CD-R/CD-RW; and
    >> the very latest I've met (Dell 4600) has dropped the FDD as standard,
    >> though still available as an option.
    >
    >Hello, Phred:
    >
    >I've built two better PC's, such as my PIII 600MHz main system, and never
    >bothered with a 5.25" floppy. Further, I replaced the Pionex's original
    >Chinon drives with Teac models and made the 3.5" one, the boot device.
    >(The hard-shelled 3.5" diskettes are far more rugged, than their flexible
    >5.25" counterparts, which truly are, "floppy!")
    >
    >> My original comment related to the ability of an early PC to see a
    >> single physical FDD as logically *both* A: and B: drives.
    >
    >Hmmm, wasn't aware of that.
    >
    >> Hmm... now you've got me intrigued! Hang on... Waddayano!
    >> Just tried DISKCOPY A: B: on this machine (Dell 4100, WinME, single
    >> 1.44MB FDD) and it did the job okay BUT when it came to inserting the
    >> target disk it said to insert it in A:, which was a bit confusing.
    >>
    >> So then tried XCOPY A:\filename B: and got "Invalid file
    >> specification". So tried plain old DOS COPY and things then went a
    >> bit pear shaped:
    >> 1. COPY picked up the file okay from A: and asked for a disk in B:
    >> 2. Put disk in "B:" and got screen flash as DOS went to full screen!
    >> 3. It then asked for disk in A: and checked it out.
    >> 4. After a bit more of this A:/B: stuff at full screen it actually
    >> made the copy okay, but the process was less than convincing!
    >> I don't recommend this technique as it's a bit startling! AFAICS
    >> it would be more convenient, and confidence building, to go A:/C:/A:
    >> if you really needed to do this sort of thing on a modern PC.
    >>
    >> Cheers, Phred.
    >>
    >> --
    >> ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
    >
    >Oh, I neglected to cite an important step, before. First, for everybody's
    >benefit, is an example of the XCOPY command:
    >
    > XCOPY A: B: <enter>
    >
    >After the copy is executed, type the following:
    >
    > LABEL B:XXXXXXXX_X <enter>
    >
    >[Note: Substitute the source disk's (A:) "volume number," for
    >XXXXXXXX_X, above. Also, <enter> simply means to press the "Enter" key.]
    >
    >Here's a Web page, explaining XCOPY in greater detail (including various
    >"switches"):
    >
    > Commands - XCOPY
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~rlively/MANUALS/COMMANDS/X/XCOPY.HTM#Diskcopy
    >
    >Good luck!
    >
    >
    >Cordially,
    > John Turco <jtur@concentric.net>

    Is there a 32 bit version of XCopy that will copy files with long
    filenames?

    Regards Brian
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:

    >Phred wrote:
    >>
    >> In article <410DE2B9.A0DC3BAC@concentric.net>, John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:
    >> >Phred wrote:
    >> >> In article <OYsOc.2404$aS.251@charlie.risq.qc.ca>, leguerri@canr.hydro.qc.ca wrote:
    >> >> >In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:
    >> >> >> "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
    >> >> >>>The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    >> >> >>>for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    >> >> >>>the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    >> >> >>>settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    >> >> >>>only allow one floppy at a time.
    >> >>
    >> >> Many (all?) older machines were happy to regard a single physical
    >> >> drive as both A: and B:, so you could do various copying things from
    >> >> A: to B: without problems. You were simply prompted to "insert disk
    >> >> for drive d:" as appropriate. Don't modern machines allow this?
    >> ><edited, for brevity>
    >>
    >> >My first computer was a Pionex 486DX2/66, purchased in 1995, since
    >> >"retired." It came with both 5.25" and 3.5" high density floppies (A: &
    >> >B:, respectively), installed; using the XCOPY command, in DOS, I could
    >> >copy from one drive to the other.
    >>
    >> Yeah, I've known several such machines as it was my standard config
    >> since my 386SX-16 of some years ago (1*1.2MB and 1*1.44MB). But more
    >> recent machines have tended to be just 1*1.44MB plus 1*CD-R/CD-RW; and
    >> the very latest I've met (Dell 4600) has dropped the FDD as standard,
    >> though still available as an option.
    >
    >Hello, Phred:
    >
    >I've built two better PC's, such as my PIII 600MHz main system, and never
    >bothered with a 5.25" floppy. Further, I replaced the Pionex's original
    >Chinon drives with Teac models and made the 3.5" one, the boot device.
    >(The hard-shelled 3.5" diskettes are far more rugged, than their flexible
    >5.25" counterparts, which truly are, "floppy!")
    >
    >> My original comment related to the ability of an early PC to see a
    >> single physical FDD as logically *both* A: and B: drives.
    >
    >Hmmm, wasn't aware of that.
    >
    >> Hmm... now you've got me intrigued! Hang on... Waddayano!
    >> Just tried DISKCOPY A: B: on this machine (Dell 4100, WinME, single
    >> 1.44MB FDD) and it did the job okay BUT when it came to inserting the
    >> target disk it said to insert it in A:, which was a bit confusing.
    >>
    >> So then tried XCOPY A:\filename B: and got "Invalid file
    >> specification". So tried plain old DOS COPY and things then went a
    >> bit pear shaped:
    >> 1. COPY picked up the file okay from A: and asked for a disk in B:
    >> 2. Put disk in "B:" and got screen flash as DOS went to full screen!
    >> 3. It then asked for disk in A: and checked it out.
    >> 4. After a bit more of this A:/B: stuff at full screen it actually
    >> made the copy okay, but the process was less than convincing!
    >> I don't recommend this technique as it's a bit startling! AFAICS
    >> it would be more convenient, and confidence building, to go A:/C:/A:
    >> if you really needed to do this sort of thing on a modern PC.
    >>
    >> Cheers, Phred.
    >>
    >> --
    >> ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
    >
    >Oh, I neglected to cite an important step, before. First, for everybody's
    >benefit, is an example of the XCOPY command:
    >
    > XCOPY A: B: <enter>
    >
    >After the copy is executed, type the following:
    >
    > LABEL B:XXXXXXXX_X <enter>
    >
    >[Note: Substitute the source disk's (A:) "volume number," for
    >XXXXXXXX_X, above. Also, <enter> simply means to press the "Enter" key.]
    >
    >Here's a Web page, explaining XCOPY in greater detail (including various
    >"switches"):
    >
    > Commands - XCOPY
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~rlively/MANUALS/COMMANDS/X/XCOPY.HTM#Diskcopy
    >
    >Good luck!
    >
    >
    >Cordially,
    > John Turco <jtur@concentric.net>

    Is there a 32 bit version of XCopy that will copy files with long
    filenames?

    Regards Brian
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    In article <h5uug0pqjqg6k8r5u5mg0ov2nbe401jljs@4ax.com>, bclark@es.co.nz wrote:
    >John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:
    >>Phred wrote:
    >>> In article <410DE2B9.A0DC3BAC@concentric.net>, John Turco
    > <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:
    >>> >Phred wrote:
    >>> >> In article <OYsOc.2404$aS.251@charlie.risq.qc.ca>,
    > leguerri@canr.hydro.qc.ca wrote:
    >>> >> >In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:
    >>> >> >> "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
    >>> >> >>>The simple way is to just substitute your 5.25
    >>> >> >>>for the 3.5 temporarily. Just let it hang out
    >>> >> >>>the side of the computer. Then change the BIOS
    >>> >> >>>settings for the floppy. Most modern machines
    >>> >> >>>only allow one floppy at a time.
    >>> >>
    >>> >> Many (all?) older machines were happy to regard a single physical
    >>> >> drive as both A: and B:, so you could do various copying things from
    >>> >> A: to B: without problems. You were simply prompted to "insert disk
    >>> >> for drive d:" as appropriate. Don't modern machines allow this?
    >>> ><edited, for brevity>
    >>>
    >>> >My first computer was a Pionex 486DX2/66, purchased in 1995, since
    >>> >"retired." It came with both 5.25" and 3.5" high density floppies (A: &
    >>> >B:, respectively), installed; using the XCOPY command, in DOS, I could
    >>> >copy from one drive to the other.
    >>>
    >>> Yeah, I've known several such machines as it was my standard config
    >>> since my 386SX-16 of some years ago (1*1.2MB and 1*1.44MB). But more
    >>> recent machines have tended to be just 1*1.44MB plus 1*CD-R/CD-RW; and
    >>> the very latest I've met (Dell 4600) has dropped the FDD as standard,
    >>> though still available as an option.
    >>
    >>Hello, Phred:
    >>
    >>I've built two better PC's, such as my PIII 600MHz main system, and never
    >>bothered with a 5.25" floppy. Further, I replaced the Pionex's original
    >>Chinon drives with Teac models and made the 3.5" one, the boot device.
    >>(The hard-shelled 3.5" diskettes are far more rugged, than their flexible
    >>5.25" counterparts, which truly are, "floppy!")
    >>
    >>> My original comment related to the ability of an early PC to see a
    >>> single physical FDD as logically *both* A: and B: drives.
    >>
    >>Hmmm, wasn't aware of that.
    >>
    >>> Hmm... now you've got me intrigued! Hang on... Waddayano!
    >>> Just tried DISKCOPY A: B: on this machine (Dell 4100, WinME, single
    >>> 1.44MB FDD) and it did the job okay BUT when it came to inserting the
    >>> target disk it said to insert it in A:, which was a bit confusing.
    >>>
    >>> So then tried XCOPY A:\filename B: and got "Invalid file
    >>> specification". So tried plain old DOS COPY and things then went a
    >>> bit pear shaped:
    >>> 1. COPY picked up the file okay from A: and asked for a disk in B:
    >>> 2. Put disk in "B:" and got screen flash as DOS went to full screen!
    >>> 3. It then asked for disk in A: and checked it out.
    >>> 4. After a bit more of this A:/B: stuff at full screen it actually
    >>> made the copy okay, but the process was less than convincing!
    >>> I don't recommend this technique as it's a bit startling! AFAICS
    >>> it would be more convenient, and confidence building, to go A:/C:/A:
    >>> if you really needed to do this sort of thing on a modern PC.
    >>
    >>Oh, I neglected to cite an important step, before. First, for everybody's
    >>benefit, is an example of the XCOPY command:
    >>
    >> XCOPY A: B: <enter>
    >>
    >>After the copy is executed, type the following:
    >>
    >> LABEL B:XXXXXXXX_X <enter>
    >>
    >>[Note: Substitute the source disk's (A:) "volume number," for
    >>XXXXXXXX_X, above. Also, <enter> simply means to press the "Enter" key.]
    >>
    >>Here's a Web page, explaining XCOPY in greater detail (including various
    >>"switches"):
    >>
    >> Commands - XCOPY
    >> http://home.earthlink.net/~rlively/MANUALS/COMMANDS/X/XCOPY.HTM#Diskcopy
    >
    >Is there a 32 bit version of XCopy that will copy files with long
    >filenames?

    G'day Brian,

    The general feeling these days seems to be that XXCOPY is the bee's
    knees: <http://www.xxcopy.com/>

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> writes:

    >Is there a 32 bit version of XCopy that will copy files with long
    >filenames?

    If run in a DOS box in 32-bit Windows, XCOPY silently invokes
    XCOPY32 which handles long filenames correctly. Only when run in 16-bit
    DOS, with Windows not running, does XCOPY lose long filenames.
    --
    --Donald Davis

    [To respond by e-mail, remove "blackhole." from the address.]
  17. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On 03 Aug 2004 06:22:57 EDT, John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:

    >I've built two better PC's, such as my PIII 600MHz main system, and never
    >bothered with a 5.25" floppy. Further, I replaced the Pionex's original
    >Chinon drives with Teac models and made the 3.5" one, the boot device.
    >(The hard-shelled 3.5" diskettes are far more rugged, than their flexible
    >5.25" counterparts, which truly are, "floppy!")

    You should have seen the original 8" disks. Those were really floppy.
    Also now you know why 5.25" were called "mini" ;)
    --
    To reply, replace digi.mon with tds.net
  18. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Impmon wrote:
    >
    > On 03 Aug 2004 06:22:57 EDT, John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:
    >
    > >I've built two better PC's, such as my PIII 600MHz main system, and never
    > >bothered with a 5.25" floppy. Further, I replaced the Pionex's original
    > >Chinon drives with Teac models and made the 3.5" one, the boot device.
    > >(The hard-shelled 3.5" diskettes are far more rugged, than their flexible
    > >5.25" counterparts, which truly are, "floppy!")
    >
    > You should have seen the original 8" disks. Those were really floppy.
    > Also now you know why 5.25" were called "mini" ;)
    > --
    > To reply, replace digi.mon with tds.net


    Hello,

    8" floppies, eh? Some of those may have been mistaken for "flying
    saucers!" <G>


    Cordially,
    John Turco <jtur@concentric.net>
  19. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On 07 Aug 2004 02:29:56 EDT, John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >8" floppies, eh? Some of those may have been mistaken for "flying
    >saucers!" <G>

    Nah, hubcaps from '40 and '50 era cars can be mistaken for one. After
    all, flying UFO are often seen as circular and not square.

    Do let me know when a square UFO appears though. ;)
    --
    To reply, replace digi.mon with tds.net
  20. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,aus.computers (More info?)

    On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 14:38:14 GMT, ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com (Phred)
    wrote:

    >1. COPY picked up the file okay from A: and asked for a disk in B:
    >2. Put disk in "B:" and got screen flash as DOS went to full screen!
    >3. It then asked for disk in A: and checked it out.
    >4. After a bit more of this A:/B: stuff at full screen it actually
    >made the copy okay, but the process was less than convincing!

    IMHO it is because the copy command can only handle 64kb at a time and
    for files larger than this one has to swap the disks many times.

    HTH

    --
    Sandy Archer
    Reply to newsgroups only
  21. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Impmon wrote:
    >
    > On 07 Aug 2004 02:29:56 EDT, John Turco <jtur@concentric.net> wrote:
    >
    > >Hello,
    > >
    > >8" floppies, eh? Some of those may have been mistaken for "flying
    > >saucers!" <G>
    >
    > Nah, hubcaps from '40 and '50 era cars can be mistaken for one. After
    > all, flying UFO are often seen as circular and not square.
    >
    > Do let me know when a square UFO appears though. ;)
    > --
    > To reply, replace digi.mon with tds.net


    Hello,

    You're right; I was only thinking of the diskette "platter," itself,
    instead of the casing. Nonetheless, "UFO's" come in all shapes and
    sizes, so maybe there are some "square" ones, after all. ;-)


    Cordially,
    John Turco <jtur@concentric.net>
  22. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,aus.computers (More info?)

    In article <njtah01ktkdvousq8r5otmlf2cca5ebvqa@4ax.com>, Ardent <iam@here.com> wrote:
    >On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 14:38:14 GMT, ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com (Phred)
    >wrote:
    >
    >>1. COPY picked up the file okay from A: and asked for a disk in B:
    >>2. Put disk in "B:" and got screen flash as DOS went to full screen!
    >>3. It then asked for disk in A: and checked it out.
    >>4. After a bit more of this A:/B: stuff at full screen it actually
    >>made the copy okay, but the process was less than convincing!
    >
    >IMHO it is because the copy command can only handle 64kb at a time and
    >for files larger than this one has to swap the disks many times.

    If that's what was going on -- and from what it did it, sounds
    rewasonable -- then I'm bloody glad I used a relatively small set of
    test files and not a full floppy of them! :-)

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
  23. Brian said:
    Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc (More info?)

    Is there some way I can connect a 5.25 inch floppy drive to a computer
    so I can read my old floppy disks. I want to copy my old disks to CD.

    I've heard of people using external cases that can contain a CD writer
    or hard drive. Would I be able to put a 1.2 meg floppy drive in an
    external case and connect it to usb or firewire port?

    Regards Brian

    Take a look at: http://webstore.kryoflux.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=1
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