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XFX adds 1,000+ Watt PSUs to Its ProSeries

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a b ) Power supply
November 13, 2011 12:12:35 AM

Wow. Pretty damn cool. Any word on the pricing?
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10
November 13, 2011 12:39:05 AM

It's parts like these that make me wish I had $6,000 to spend on a God-like rig
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November 13, 2011 12:48:59 AM

1000w platinum rating sounds pretty intense. I only wish that XFX would bring back it's lime green color scheme. I miss those lime green gts 250s.
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a c 77 ) Power supply
November 13, 2011 12:57:36 AM

ImThat1GuyWow. Pretty damn cool. Any word on the pricing?

Newegg has the 1000W listed at $269.99 & the 1250W at $299.99
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a c 288 ) Power supply
November 13, 2011 12:59:39 AM

Looks like they are going to be selling some Seasonic X-1050s and X-1250 along with the Platinum-1000. Should be solid units, the Seasonic X series has done quite well, i expect the two new models will as well.
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November 13, 2011 2:01:33 AM

tecmo34Newegg has the 1000W listed at $269.99 & the 1250W at $299.99


That's actually really reasonable for a high end and effecent 1000+
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November 13, 2011 9:00:06 AM

Josh5890It's parts like these that make me wish I had $6,000 to spend on a God-like rig

I pay your 6 and raise for 6 more ;) 
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a b ) Power supply
November 13, 2011 9:00:28 AM

Price is equal to the quality.
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November 13, 2011 9:09:12 AM

lp231Some 1K watt PSU uses a different type of power cord, such as this Antec 1200http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6817371039Are these types better than those standard ones we use all the time?

Nope they are same, it's different cords for different countries. The one you provided is very odd tbh. For EU plugs those prongs should be rotated for 90 degrees, for UK middle prong should be rotated, for US it should be female connector on PSU and this is male connector. I don't know what type of plug that is, but all are the same performance wise. Only difference is with US 110V compared to 230V.
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November 13, 2011 10:05:51 AM

Whats the point of building a gaming PC that needs a 1000 watt PSU?

The crazy high power consumption comes from the use of end of life chip technologies.
When you start to push the limits of a chip design, you start to get very high power consumptions.

A videocard setup that would need 700+ watts on it's own will be easily beaten by a low power mid range videocard a year or so from now.

Game makers also do not target super high end so it is mostly for bragging rights to have a overkill system.

The only times when overkill comes in handy is when doing stuff like running games that are more considered to be technology demos on a 30 inch display or better yet, across 3 of them.
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November 13, 2011 12:45:13 PM

Razor512Whats the point of building a gaming PC that needs a 1000 watt PSU?The crazy high power consumption comes from the use of end of life chip technologies.When you start to push the limits of a chip design, you start to get very high power consumptions.A videocard setup that would need 700+ watts on it's own will be easily beaten by a low power mid range videocard a year or so from now.Game makers also do not target super high end so it is mostly for bragging rights to have a overkill system.The only times when overkill comes in handy is when doing stuff like running games that are more considered to be technology demos on a 30 inch display or better yet, across 3 of them.


all max settings
a 2560x1600 monitor can push most cards so hard you need a second one to be playable.
a 3 monitor 1920x1200 setup can easily need 2 cards
not to mention a 5 or 6 monitor setup.

than there are the few games that take advantage of dx11, and cant get good fps without 2 cards

than there are also the setups above, but for 3d, and before you tell me gimick, play a game that was made for 3d or at the very least optimized.

there are plenty of reasons for a 700+ watt system,
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November 13, 2011 1:07:26 PM

Another good reason to buy a 700+ watt system is so that you can compute for science (CPU+GPU distributed computing)when you aren't using it! You electric bill will be huge but you'll be helping science!
But seriously it is overkill to buy such a system for many reasons.
-You take a huge reduction in value when your stuff is no longer the latest and greatest. It's simply not a good investment. Buying a good motherboard with a medium-end processor, and other medium-end components will save you $$$ and let you upgrade in the future with newer video cards that are much faster but don't take any more power.
-The components are not necessarily that good with performance/watt, although they can be if you undervolt and slightly underclock except for when you need all the computing power it can muster.
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November 13, 2011 1:32:17 PM

Razor512Whats the point of building a gaming PC that needs a 1000 watt PSU?The crazy high power consumption comes from the use of end of life chip technologies.When you start to push the limits of a chip design, you start to get very high power consumptions.A videocard setup that would need 700+ watts on it's own will be easily beaten by a low power mid range videocard a year or so from now.Game makers also do not target super high end so it is mostly for bragging rights to have a overkill system.The only times when overkill comes in handy is when doing stuff like running games that are more considered to be technology demos on a 30 inch display or better yet, across 3 of them.

Pair of 6990s on 3 full HD screens will hardly be beaten in year or two by anything in mid range, not to talk about triple GTX 580 or 6970 systems. Sit down and shut up.
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November 13, 2011 4:43:54 PM

hetneoNope they are same, it's different cords for different countries. The one you provided is very odd tbh. For EU plugs those prongs should be rotated for 90 degrees, for UK middle prong should be rotated, for US it should be female connector on PSU and this is male connector. I don't know what type of plug that is, but all are the same performance wise. Only difference is with US 110V compared to 230V.

PSUs have male connectors on them in the US but the 3 prongs are all vertical not horizontal.
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November 13, 2011 5:12:38 PM

The issues is that the user with a 30 inch display or multiple 30 inch displays is a very tiny minority , because of that, very few games are targeted at those specs. and with high end parts, after a certain price point, the performance per dollar drops significantly, so you are mostly wasting money by going with a top of the line bragging right set of hardware that is not only many times more expensive but also uses 2-3 times the power.

The end result is overpriced power hungry that will be beaten by cheaper, lower power hardware that will perform just as good or better. Also I have tested dual GTX 580 systems under a killawatt and you can get away with a 750 watt power supply and still have power left over.

(The only way i can see someone going over 1000 watts is if they are doing triple SLI with GTX 590 cards, at which case, there is something wrong with them and their ability to keep their money)

I have built many high end systems for people in the past (and still do), and the issue is that the customer is having me build a $2000 system that will lose probably 60%+ of it's value within a year as other cards come out that can offer similar performance at a lower price and not turn the spinning disk in the power meter into a helicopter.

If you don't believe me, check out the sales of used high end parts, you will notice that unless you sell them while they are still high end/ top of the like, eg within 3-6 months, they tend not to sell, or not sell for much because people who understand the hardware will also understand the power requirements as well as the thermal issues)
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November 13, 2011 5:52:52 PM

razor512Whats the point of building a gaming PC that needs a 1000 watt PSU?The crazy high power consumption comes from the use of end of life chip technologies.When you start to push the limits of a chip design, you start to get very high power consumptions.A videocard setup that would need 700+ watts on it's own will be easily beaten by a low power mid range videocard a year or so from now.Game makers also do not target super high end so it is mostly for bragging rights to have a overkill system.The only times when overkill comes in handy is when doing stuff like running games that are more considered to be technology demos on a 30 inch display or better yet, across 3 of them.


Because PSUs are at their most efficient when they're under a load of half their rating. So, if you're rig is pulling around 500 to 600W, a 1k PSU will be, depending on it's efficiency rating, giving you the maximum efficiency of converting wall power to usable power for the system (so, say you have a gold PSU that is rated for 90% efficiency, that means that at 500W for the system, you're pulling 550W from the wall). When you're closer to the high end on the load (say 500W and using a 600W PSU), you system is less efficient and draws more power from the wall (for the same gold PSU, because you're over the 80% load amount for the PSU, that means you're usually losing a few percent in efficiency so instead of being 90% efficient, you're probably 86% to 87%, which means you draw 565W from the wall instead of 550W if you were using a 1k PSU at the half load area). And lets not forget, with a 1k PSU, you have headroom to add more things then with a tighter PSU for your system requirements (like upgrading the video cards, newer cards may draw more power and may require you to get a new PSU if you're tight where as a 1k PSU wouldn't even blink).
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a c 288 ) Power supply
November 13, 2011 9:18:44 PM

The bit about being most efficient at 50% load is null with Gold and Platinum rated units, you are talking at most 4% difference which even at full load won't add up. A gold unit is at least 87-90-87 at 20%-50%-100% load so the efficiency difference between 50% and 100% is really insignificant so i really don't like it when people use that as their reason for getting a bigger PSU than necessary. 20% extra headroom will keep you from overstressing the unit and will keep it plenty efficient, no need for 50% headroom thats just wasting money.


As for the comments about the weird connector on it, thats a C19 connector, regular PSUs have C14 connectors which are not rated for nearly as much current as a C19 connector which is why big units like the TP1200 have C19 connectors. The connector on the PSU has absolutely nothing to do with the wall connector in the country you want to use it in, they sell cables for every wall socket.
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November 14, 2011 1:50:35 AM

I really like how powersupply's are becoming more efficient.
im more concerned with the lifetime of a powersupply and the noise it makes than i am about its looks, or if it is modular or not.

solidlink technology???
I dont see why they even bothered mentioning this.. in my opinion, having the connectors on the same pcb as the rest of the components makes the psu more fragile, and probably increases resistance.. < the copper traces on circut boards in traditional powersupply's is usually a higher AWG than the tin coated copper wires that are used to link boards together.. so is probably not a better design than the traditional setup of wires between boards. wires have flex and can deal with viberation well. traces on boards that solder directly to connectors are a bad idea, the connections have to deal with pressure when inserting and removing connecters. its all to common to find cold solder connections and lifted traces in electronics when the connector is soldered to the pcb boards. the resistance between a inch or two of 12-18awg wire is not worth mentioning. if that amount of power is worth considering,, than simply remove a led from your computer tower... I think solidlink technology is a way to save some copper and make the psu easyier to assemble. With having no seperate board to mount to the inside of the psu for the modular connections, there is one less step in the assembly process.
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November 14, 2011 4:19:13 AM

those psus look like the galaxy gtx 450/460 cards, with the space-marine shaped plastic.
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November 14, 2011 6:50:48 PM

I have been very happy with my 30" setup; it is hard to beat four megapixel gaming. Almost all modern games support the native 2560x1600 resolution. A few older games require some hacking (usually the ones which don't support anything but 3x4 out of the box). To drive this monitor I built a GTX285 SLI setup with a 1KW PSU a couple years ago. It cost a bit over $2k, which does not seem too extravagant to me. This setup has had plenty of power to run everything out there at the 4MP res. The main issue I have run into is with the 1GB memory; a few games need more memory to max out the settings at 4MP. Heat is an issue in the summer too... 1KW (really it is more like 600W at the wall for a demanding game) serves as a pretty good space heater.
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March 7, 2012 8:47:10 AM

Cool,but it will not suit my pocket
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