Drive Image destroyed partition

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

I'd appreciate a bit of urgent hand-holding please. It's been two
years since the first time I used Drive Image 2002. Nor do I have a
confident grasp of partition management anyway.

I have 2 identical Maxtor '60 GB' HDs on this Windows XP Home PC. Up
until last night they each had 2 similar partitions:
Disk 1
C: system 11.72 GB
D: Data etc 44.14 GB

Disk 2
E: 2 year old copy of system 11.72 GB
F: Routine backup etc 44.14 GB

Last night, after some basic house-keeping, and making 2 'Drive Image
Rescue diskettes', I ran DI 2002, using Copy Drives (note, not making
an 'image'). I accepted the default, presumably set as I left it 2
years ago, to copy C to E. (My aim was to get this alternative XP
system up to date, in case I ever have to boot into it.) FWIW, I did
change a couple of the settings:
'Check for file system errors' YES
Verify Disk writes YES

Anyway, it all seemed to go as planned at first. DI 2002 asked to
reboot, then started work in 'Caldera DOS', steadily indexing then
copying. But then, after an hour or two, with some 2 or 3 GB copied,
it just stopped unceremoniously, no messages, and my PC rebooted.

The system could not then find E. My PC didn't recognise its
existence.

I repeated the exercise in DI, except this time DI was copying C to
'Unallocated space on HD 2', or something like that. I got the same
result - an unceremonious reboot.

So that entire partition is now zapped ;-(
If I now use DI Drive Operations, this is what I see:

http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Images/DriveImage1.gif

Any suggestions on what next to try to get a working E: 'system 2'
partition back would be greatly welcomed please! I'm very nervous of
making matters worse. Could I use the rescue diskettes? Or must I face
it that E is gone for good? In which case, how can I *confidently*
make a new E? I feel very exposed to losing my entire system if DI can
destroy a partition with such apparent ease.

FWIW, I do also have Partition Magic 7.0, with which I'm equally
inexperienced.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated please. I may post this to a
couple of other groups too.

--
Terry, West Sussex, UK
17
answers
Last reply
More about drive image destroyed partition
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Some more potentially significant information has turned up. I had
    decided that my next step would be to use DI 2002 to make an image of
    C. I did some housekeeping again, such as Run chkdsk c: /f, and using
    Startup Cop to remove all my many startup programs/processes. I ran DI
    and started the image from C to D (both on Disk 1). All was going
    smoothly, as before, but then it stopped. This time however I got a
    message: "Error #48 Sector Not Found"

    Further research turned up several users reporting that this error
    arose even though they had done a thorough CHKDSK run. However, I will
    repeat my CHKDSK and try again. Must say I'm still very nervous!

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >Some more potentially significant information has turned up. I had
    >decided that my next step would be to use DI 2002 to make an image of
    >C. I did some housekeeping again, such as Run chkdsk c: /f, and using
    >Startup Cop to remove all my many startup programs/processes. I ran DI
    >and started the image from C to D (both on Disk 1). All was going
    >smoothly, as before, but then it stopped. This time however I got a
    >message: "Error #48 Sector Not Found"
    >
    >Further research turned up several users reporting that this error
    >arose even though they had done a thorough CHKDSK run. However, I will
    >repeat my CHKDSK and try again. Must say I'm still very nervous!

    The Drive Image "copy disk" function is usually used to copy an
    existing partition to a new blank disk drive. That is why DI wants to
    copy to an unused part of Disk2.

    If e: was just DI backup images, then the simplest solution I believe
    is to use the XP Disk Management function to create e: on Disk 2, then
    format e:. Then you can you use DI to create a normal image from c:
    to e:.

    If e: contained other data and you want to recover that data, then you
    need other data recovery software to attempt that.

    Also, the rescue diskettes have all the functions of the Windows
    version. You can boot from those 2 diskettes and run DI that way if
    you want.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    John . <john@notme.com> wrote:

    >The Drive Image "copy disk" function is usually used to copy an
    >existing partition to a new blank disk drive. That is why DI wants to
    >copy to an unused part of Disk2.
    >
    >If e: was just DI backup images, then the simplest solution I believe
    >is to use the XP Disk Management function to create e: on Disk 2, then
    >format e:. Then you can you use DI to create a normal image from c:
    >to e:.
    >
    >If e: contained other data and you want to recover that data, then you
    >need other data recovery software to attempt that.
    >
    >Also, the rescue diskettes have all the functions of the Windows
    >version. You can boot from those 2 diskettes and run DI that way if
    >you want.

    Thanks John. But as I explained, E is meant to be a copy of C, my
    system partition, allowing me to boot into it during the XP boot-up
    process as an alternative to C. They appear as
    'Windows XP Home Edition'
    'Windows XP Home Edition #1'

    An image wouldn't achieve that.

    When I did it initially, two years ago, I'm pretty sure I created the
    two partitions, E and F, on my new hard disk, and then used Copy Drive
    to copy C to E. That's what I'm attempting again now.

    -------

    Yesterday I made some progress. But I still have some
    worries. The devil is in the details, so I'll explain fully.

    I started by recovering my E partition, which I managed
    more simply than I expected, just using XP Computer Management>Disk
    Management.

    Then, because of that bad sector message, I ran
    chkdsk c: /r
    as I'd realised that previously I'd not checked the sectors. I was
    encouraged that it found a bad sector: "Windows replaced bad clusters
    in file 10904 of name windows/system32/glmf32.dll"

    I then meant to do a similar chkdsk /r on e:, but carelessly repeated
    it on c:. As there appeared to be no Cancel option, I sat through it
    again. But I was surprised to see that identical message appear again.
    Is that because XP doesn't actually *repair* the sector or cluster,
    but just sort of fixes the index or whatever?

    Anyway, I then tried to repeat my drive copy of C to E with DI 2002.
    But this time, although both C and E were apparently identical sizes
    of 11.72 GB, I noticed that it said the destination was too small.
    Presumably by a whisker?

    So then I ran PM 7 and nervously moved E and F around, and marginally
    increased E's size. That ran 9 'operations' and took about 3 hours!

    But now I am very confused by the display I see in PM:
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/PM-AfterChanges.gif

    For one thing, I don't recall previously seeing anything about an
    'Extended' partition before the changes, although I could be mistaken.
    Is this an error on my part? Can I get rid of this Extended partition,
    which just adds another level complexity as far as I'm concerned?

    But more important, the sizes shown do not square with what I get from
    XP Disk Management:
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/XPDiskMgmt.gif

    That shows E as only 11.83 GB, not 12.11 GB.

    Any further help would be greatly appreciated please, as I am *very*
    uncomfortable with all this stuff.


    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >But now I am very confused by the display I see in PM:
    >http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/PM-AfterChanges.gif
    >
    >For one thing, I don't recall previously seeing anything about an
    >'Extended' partition before the changes, although I could be mistaken.
    >Is this an error on my part? Can I get rid of this Extended partition,
    >which just adds another level complexity as far as I'm concerned?

    No you can't. Look back at your DI picture and you can see that d:
    and F: are logical partitions, which is correct.
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Images/DriveImage1.gif

    Normally there is one primary partition on a physical drive, along
    with, if wanted, one extended partition. Within the extended
    partition can be one or more logical partitions.

    If you're just trying to have an IDENTICAL Disk2, then why not take a
    simple approach: Delete all partitions on Disk2, Use Drive Image to
    "copy disk" copying disk1 to disk2.

    Then disk2 will be same as disk1.

    (Always be certain you have a GOOD backup (CDR or DVD or external
    disk, etc.) of disk1 before doing all this)
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    John . <john@notme.com> wrote:

    >The Drive Image "copy disk" function is usually used to copy an
    >existing partition to a new blank disk drive. That is why DI wants to
    >copy to an unused part of Disk2.

    Since my reply earlier today, I think the penny is finally beginning
    to drop here! It's as you say: DI apparently won't let me copy 'into'
    an empty partition. My intuition said it obviously would, but clearly
    it won't, for whatever reason!

    So I must have been wrong in my recollection of how I achieved this
    originally, two years ago. Which raises the question of how I *did*
    achieve it?! I know for sure it was with the Copy Drive feature of DI
    2002. How could I have got to the state of E and F on my new HD, with
    an 11 GB E partition containing a copy of C, alongside a 45 GB F
    partition containing data? I've booted into that E copy of XP Home
    several times in that two years, fortunately in a spirit of experiment
    and not in emergency due to failure of C.

    That's now just a matter of intellectual curiosity though. The
    important point is how can I do it *now*?

    >If e: was just DI backup images, then the simplest solution I believe
    >is to use the XP Disk Management function to create e: on Disk 2, then
    >format e:. Then you can you use DI to create a normal image from c:
    >to e:.

    As mentioned yesterday, out of nervousness I made my first *image* of
    C onto F, and now have 3 files there:
    MyBackup-C8Sep04-1330.002
    MyBackup-C8Sep04-1330.003
    MyBackup-C8Sep04-1330.pqi

    So, in an emergency, I could presumably use DI 2002 to restore C, yes?
    But, as mentioned earlier, I don't see how placing that image in E
    would have helped me achieve my objective?

    The bottom line is, how can I now get to my objective, from the
    current state as shown in the various screenshots I've uploaded,
    repeated here?
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/PM-AfterChanges.gif
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/XPDiskMgmt.gif
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/DI-AfterChanges.gif

    I'm sure it will be embarrassingly obvious when I finally grasp how to
    do it!

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    John . <john@notme.com> wrote:

    >Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >>But now I am very confused by the display I see in PM:
    >>http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/PM-AfterChanges.gif
    >>
    >>For one thing, I don't recall previously seeing anything about an
    >>'Extended' partition before the changes, although I could be mistaken.
    >>Is this an error on my part? Can I get rid of this Extended partition,
    >>which just adds another level complexity as far as I'm concerned?
    >
    >No you can't. Look back at your DI picture and you can see that d:
    >and F: are logical partitions, which is correct.
    >http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Images/DriveImage1.gif

    Thanks for bearing with me. But I think you're out of synch! That link
    was to yesterday's status. In the post to which you are replying, I
    gave two new links showing the latest status, as seen in PM and XP
    Disk Management respectively.

    To repeat those here for convenience, the latest position, reached
    last night and still unchanged while I ponder what to do, is shown in:
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/PM-AfterChanges.gif
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/XPDiskMgmt.gif
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/DI-AfterChanges.gif

    Did you have any thoughts on my question as to the discrepancy in
    sizes please?

    Also, I've just encountered another puzzle: if open My Computer, my
    new E partition is not included. Any idea why not please?

    >Normally there is one primary partition on a physical drive, along
    >with, if wanted, one extended partition. Within the extended
    >partition can be one or more logical partitions.
    >
    >If you're just trying to have an IDENTICAL Disk2, then why not take a
    >simple approach: Delete all partitions on Disk2, Use Drive Image to
    >"copy disk" copying disk1 to disk2.

    But I don't want to have identical disks. I described what I had (and
    what I want to retrieve) in my first post:
    news:4rdcm09c8s0q4iu3p1068pe4na6b17h1dn@4ax.com

    While I want E to be a copy of C, I don't want F to be a copy of D.

    >Then disk2 will be same as disk1.
    >
    >(Always be certain you have a GOOD backup (CDR or DVD or external
    >disk, etc.) of disk1 before doing all this)

    I wish I could say I did have that. Do many users really back up 45 GB
    or so to CD? Some 65 or 70 CDs? And, without testing it, have
    confidence it would be restored without a hitch?

    But I back up most of my data (to F) each night, and - up until the
    present disaster! - I had an oldish version of C in E, to which I
    could always boot if required.

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:

    >John . <john@notme.com> wrote:
    >
    >>The Drive Image "copy disk" function is usually used to copy an
    >>existing partition to a new blank disk drive. That is why DI wants to
    >>copy to an unused part of Disk2.
    >
    >Since my reply earlier today, I think the penny is finally beginning
    >to drop here! It's as you say: DI apparently won't let me copy 'into'
    >an empty partition. My intuition said it obviously would, but clearly
    >it won't, for whatever reason!
    >
    >So I must have been wrong in my recollection of how I achieved this
    >originally, two years ago. Which raises the question of how I *did*
    >achieve it?! I know for sure it was with the Copy Drive feature of DI
    >2002. How could I have got to the state of E and F on my new HD, with
    >an 11 GB E partition containing a copy of C, alongside a 45 GB F
    >partition containing data? I've booted into that E copy of XP Home
    >several times in that two years, fortunately in a spirit of experiment
    >and not in emergency due to failure of C.

    Two years ago, I'm guessing that disk2 was empty. So DI "Copy disk"
    function copied into the empty disk and created the partitions.
    >
    >That's now just a matter of intellectual curiosity though. The
    >important point is how can I do it *now*?
    >
    >>If e: was just DI backup images, then the simplest solution I believe
    >>is to use the XP Disk Management function to create e: on Disk 2, then
    >>format e:. Then you can you use DI to create a normal image from c:
    >>to e:.
    >
    >As mentioned yesterday, out of nervousness I made my first *image* of
    >C onto F, and now have 3 files there:
    >MyBackup-C8Sep04-1330.002
    >MyBackup-C8Sep04-1330.003
    >MyBackup-C8Sep04-1330.pqi
    >
    >So, in an emergency, I could presumably use DI 2002 to restore C, yes?
    >But, as mentioned earlier, I don't see how placing that image in E
    >would have helped me achieve my objective?
    >
    >The bottom line is, how can I now get to my objective, from the
    >current state as shown in the various screenshots I've uploaded,
    >repeated here?
    >http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/PM-AfterChanges.gif
    >http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/XPDiskMgmt.gif
    >http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/DI-AfterChanges.gif
    >
    >I'm sure it will be embarrassingly obvious when I finally grasp how to
    >do it!

    Why not just use DI to create images of c: and d: into one of the
    partitions on disk 2? In the event of a failure of disk1:, you boot
    from the CD or emergency diskettes, and restore the image back onto c:
    or d: (or a replacement disk1)

    I can't follow all your other scenarios. KIS (keep it simple)
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Pending any replies to my last post, one approach I thought should
    work was to take advantage of the precautionary *image* of C that I
    wrote in F. It seems to me that I should now be able to restore this
    to E, the new, empty partition I've created. But I can't get my mind
    around why DI 2002 says it's going to *delete* E to do this! The very
    last message I get before I commit to this restore is this:
    -------
    Deleting partition: E:System 2
    (NTFS, Primary volume, 12111.5 MB on Disk:2)

    Restoring partition(s):
    System (*) 8.21 GB
    From image file: F:\MyBackup-C8Sep04-1330.pqi
    To free space location (12111.5 MB in size) on Disk: 2
    -------

    Can someone explain to me why I cannot just get the restore into E
    please? Why would DI instead place it in 'free space'?

    I have the feeling there's a basic concept here I just have not
    grasped. Surely it shouldn't be this hard to achieve what I'm trying
    to do, namely get back to where I was a couple of days ago, with an
    alternative system partition for booting to in emergency?

    I've chickened out of this restore until I can understand better what
    it implies.

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    John . <john@notme.com> wrote:

    >Two years ago, I'm guessing that disk2 was empty. So DI "Copy disk"
    >function copied into the empty disk and created the partitions.
    >>
    >>That's now just a matter of intellectual curiosity though. The
    >>important point is how can I do it *now*?

    Thanks for your patience on this.

    <snip>

    >Why not just use DI to create images of c: and d: into one of the
    >partitions on disk 2? In the event of a failure of disk1:, you boot
    >from the CD or emergency diskettes, and restore the image back onto c:
    >or d: (or a replacement disk1)
    >
    >I can't follow all your other scenarios. KIS (keep it simple)

    Pleased to say I have now managed to get a copy of my XP Home system
    partition C onto partition E. FWIW, I restored the precautionary image
    of C (which I had place on D), onto E. This meant ignoring what I now
    regard as misleading/ambiguous warnings from DI 2002 that confused me
    for a long time, that it would 'delete the partition'. I think it
    meant it would delete the partition *contents*, because after the
    restore I still *had* E, and it looks identical to C. I can
    copy/move/etc in it with Explorer.

    So on the face of it I now have what I originally had, except that E
    is now an up to date copy of C, rather than nearly 2 years old, i.e.
    what the exercise set out to achieve:

    HD 1 (60 GB MAXTOR)
    -------------------
    C system
    D data

    HD 2 (60 GB MAXTOR)
    ------------------
    E system 2 (copy of C)
    F more data

    However...the bad news is that it doesn't work. When I reboot and get
    the familiar 3 options for a few seconds:
    Windows XP Home Edition
    Windows XP Home Edition #1
    XP Recovery Console

    if I choose the second, instead of booting into XP as it used to do, I
    now get this error message:

    "Windows could not start because the following file is missing or
    corrupt:
    <Windows root>\system32\hal.dll.
    Please reinstall a copy of the above file"

    Yet that file looks identical in both C and E (75.6 KB, 29th Aug
    2002).

    Any suggestions on how I might try fixing that please?

    Sorry for length of these posts <g>. But the devil is in the details
    as they say, and I always think it's better to offer as much info as
    possible.

    --
    Terry Pinnell
    Hobbyist, West Sussex, UK
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >
    >So on the face of it I now have what I originally had, except that E
    >is now an up to date copy of C, rather than nearly 2 years old, i.e.
    >what the exercise set out to achieve:
    >
    >HD 1 (60 GB MAXTOR)
    >-------------------
    >C system
    >D data
    >
    >HD 2 (60 GB MAXTOR)
    >------------------
    >E system 2 (copy of C)
    >F more data
    >
    >However...the bad news is that it doesn't work. When I reboot and get
    >the familiar 3 options for a few seconds:
    >Windows XP Home Edition
    >Windows XP Home Edition #1
    >XP Recovery Console
    >
    >if I choose the second, instead of booting into XP as it used to do, I
    >now get this error message:
    >
    >"Windows could not start because the following file is missing or
    >corrupt:
    ><Windows root>\system32\hal.dll.
    >Please reinstall a copy of the above file"
    >
    >Yet that file looks identical in both C and E (75.6 KB, 29th Aug
    >2002).
    >
    >Any suggestions on how I might try fixing that please?
    >
    >Sorry for length of these posts <g>. But the devil is in the details
    >as they say, and I always think it's better to offer as much info as
    >possible.

    You will need to research and/or post the Windows error message in one
    of the XP newsgroups probably.

    I still don't understand why it is so important to be able to
    dual-boot to an alternate disk drive at any time. If you need this
    kind of immediate backup protection, look at RAID controllers and
    mirroring.

    If you just want a good backup image in case of a problem, then just
    make Disk2 one large data partition, and use DI or Ghost 9 or Acronis
    True Image to create a backup image of Disk1 to your Disk2 data
    partition.

    Keep it simple.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message news:asuhm0l7pea5qmloj34431rjgv3galgf9i@4ax.com
    > John . <john@notme.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Two years ago, I'm guessing that disk2 was empty. So DI "Copy disk"
    > > function copied into the empty disk and created the partitions.
    > > >
    > > > That's now just a matter of intellectual curiosity though. The
    > > > important point is how can I do it *now*?
    >
    > Thanks for your patience on this.
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > > Why not just use DI to create images of c: and d: into one of the
    > > partitions on disk 2? In the event of a failure of disk1:, you boot
    > > from the CD or emergency diskettes, and restore the image back onto c:
    > > or d: (or a replacement disk1)
    > >
    > > I can't follow all your other scenarios. KIS (keep it simple)
    >
    > Pleased to say I have now managed to get a copy of my XP Home system
    > partition C onto partition E. FWIW, I restored the precautionary image
    > of C (which I had place on D), onto E. This meant ignoring what I now
    > regard as misleading/ambiguous warnings from DI 2002 that confused me
    > for a long time, that it would 'delete the partition'. I think it
    > meant it would delete the partition *contents*, because after the
    > restore I still *had* E, and it looks identical to C. I can
    > copy/move/etc in it with Explorer.

    And what has that got to do whether DI did or didn't delete the partition first (and then created it again to the proper size needed
    for copying)?
    Point is that the original e: drive is deleted.

    >
    > So on the face of it I now have what I originally had, except that E
    > is now an up to date copy of C, rather than nearly 2 years old, i.e.
    > what the exercise set out to achieve:
    >
    > HD 1 (60 GB MAXTOR)
    > -------------------
    > C system
    > D data
    >
    > HD 2 (60 GB MAXTOR)
    > ------------------
    > E system 2 (copy of C)
    > F more data
    >
    > However...the bad news is that it doesn't work. When I reboot and get
    > the familiar 3 options for a few seconds:
    > Windows XP Home Edition
    > Windows XP Home Edition #1
    > XP Recovery Console
    >
    > if I choose the second, instead of booting into XP as it used to do, I
    > now get this error message:
    >
    > "Windows could not start because the following file is missing or
    > corrupt:
    > <Windows root>\system32\hal.dll.
    > Please reinstall a copy of the above file"
    >
    > Yet that file looks identical in both C and E (75.6 KB, 29th Aug
    > 2002).
    >
    > Any suggestions on how I might try fixing that please?
    >
    > Sorry for length of these posts <g>. But the devil is in the details
    > as they say, and I always think it's better to offer as much info as
    > possible.
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    John . <john@notme.com> wrote:


    >You will need to research and/or post the Windows error message in one
    >of the XP newsgroups probably.
    >
    >I still don't understand why it is so important to be able to
    >dual-boot to an alternate disk drive at any time. If you need this
    >kind of immediate backup protection, look at RAID controllers and
    >mirroring.

    Pleased to say, after another entire day on it, it's now achieved.

    >If you just want a good backup image in case of a problem, then just
    >make Disk2 one large data partition, and use DI or Ghost 9 or Acronis
    >True Image to create a backup image of Disk1 to your Disk2 data
    >partition.

    What happens if your normal system HD fails? To what do you restore
    the image?

    And also I think I'd worry about whether that image would actually
    work when the crunch came. With a (snapshot) copy of C now on E, I can
    examine E with Explore, and boot to it at any time, without exposing
    my normal system to risk.

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >>If you just want a good backup image in case of a problem, then just
    >>make Disk2 one large data partition, and use DI or Ghost 9 or Acronis
    >>True Image to create a backup image of Disk1 to your Disk2 data
    >>partition.
    >
    >What happens if your normal system HD fails? To what do you restore
    >the image?
    >
    a new disk drive, for a total disk drive failure,

    or to the existing c: partition if just the operating system failed or
    you want to roll back.
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    John . <john@notme.com> wrote:

    >Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >>>If you just want a good backup image in case of a problem, then just
    >>>make Disk2 one large data partition, and use DI or Ghost 9 or Acronis
    >>>True Image to create a backup image of Disk1 to your Disk2 data
    >>>partition.
    >>
    >>What happens if your normal system HD fails? To what do you restore
    >>the image?
    >>
    >a new disk drive, for a total disk drive failure,
    >
    >or to the existing c: partition if just the operating system failed or
    >you want to roll back.

    I see your point. If the drive fails, I'm going to have to replace it!

    I need to rethink my basic backup/recovery strategy. You've been
    generous with your advice already, so hope you won't mind my follow up
    questions here. Knowing what you now know of my setup, what approach
    would *you* take? To remind you:

    Drive 1
    -------
    C: system 11 GB
    D: Data etc 44 GB (also now contains an image of C)

    Drive 2
    -------
    E: Snapshot bootable copy 10th Sep 2004 of system 11 GB
    F: Routine backup etc 44 GB (Often used to recover or compare files)

    Finally (!) I now wonder whether I have after all resolved this issue
    of drive letters and bootup. The position right now as I compose this
    is:
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/XPDiskMgmt11Sep.gif

    I now see 'Active' against E. Does that mean I am now 'running' from
    that system, i.e. on my 2nd HD, not from C as I thought last night?

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >John . <john@notme.com> wrote:
    >>Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >>>>If you just want a good backup image in case of a problem, then just
    >>>>make Disk2 one large data partition, and use DI or Ghost 9 or Acronis
    >>>>True Image to create a backup image of Disk1 to your Disk2 data
    >>>>partition.
    >>>
    >>>What happens if your normal system HD fails? To what do you restore
    >>>the image?
    >>>
    >>a new disk drive, for a total disk drive failure,
    >>
    >>or to the existing c: partition if just the operating system failed or
    >>you want to roll back.
    >
    >I see your point. If the drive fails, I'm going to have to replace it!
    >
    >I need to rethink my basic backup/recovery strategy. You've been
    >generous with your advice already, so hope you won't mind my follow up
    >questions here. Knowing what you now know of my setup, what approach
    >would *you* take? To remind you:
    >
    >Drive 1
    >-------
    >C: system 11 GB
    >D: Data etc 44 GB (also now contains an image of C)
    >
    >Drive 2
    >-------
    >E: Snapshot bootable copy 10th Sep 2004 of system 11 GB
    >F: Routine backup etc 44 GB (Often used to recover or compare files)

    If you like the dual-boot and hot backup approach, it's fine. For
    myself, I use a second disk just for backup. It contains images of my
    disk1 partitions which I create using Ghost 9.

    You should solicit other people's opinions however on this or other
    newsgroups. Start a new thread with new topic. Also look at
    newsgroup alt.backup-software or ask backup questions there also.

    There are many backup approaches. Be thankful at least you are
    proactive. Many unfortunately have no backup!

    >
    >Finally (!) I now wonder whether I have after all resolved this issue
    >of drive letters and bootup. The position right now as I compose this
    >is:
    >http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/XPDiskMgmt11Sep.gif
    >
    >I now see 'Active' against E. Does that mean I am now 'running' from
    >that system, i.e. on my 2nd HD, not from C as I thought last night?

    There can be more than one primary partition on a physical disk, but
    only one primary partition can be active at any time. I believe that
    is what this is indicating.

    john
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    The current OS partition always shows up as Boot.

    Active means bootable. The active part that booted shows up as System, and
    other ones as Active.

    "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    news:8dmkm0liqvkps6vrd0qadh6vjge7gd7p05@4ax.com...
    >
    > Drive 1
    > -------
    > C: system 11 GB
    > D: Data etc 44 GB (also now contains an image of C)
    >
    > Drive 2
    > -------
    > E: Snapshot bootable copy 10th Sep 2004 of system 11 GB
    > F: Routine backup etc 44 GB (Often used to recover or compare files)
    >
    > Finally (!) I now wonder whether I have after all resolved this issue
    > of drive letters and bootup. The position right now as I compose this
    > is:
    > http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/XPDiskMgmt11Sep.gif
    >
    > I now see 'Active' against E. Does that mean I am now 'running' from
    > that system, i.e. on my 2nd HD, not from C as I thought last night?
    >
  17. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@graffiti.net> wrote:

    >The current OS partition always shows up as Boot.
    >
    >Active means bootable. The active part that booted shows up as System, and
    >other ones as Active.

    Many thanks, Eric - at last I think I'm beginning to understand. Must
    say I find it all very counter-intuitive! Can you and others bear with
    me a few minutes while I try to explain further what I'm trying to do
    please. From your definition above, it may be that I'm already there!.

    I've booted to XP Home Edition, the 'first' of my 2 multi-boot
    options. This is what my system looks like according to XP Disk
    Management:
    http://www.terrypin.dial.pipex.com/Misc/Sep12-XP.gif

    From that, how can I tell definitively what partition I am 'running
    in'?

    BTW, both Drive Image 2002 and Partition Manager 7.0 just show both as
    'Active'; no distinction.)

    My interpretation before Eric's post was that I'm 'in' E, instead of C
    where I want to be. That was based on seeing that 'Active' annotation
    XP shows against E. But it now seems I was mistaken, and I'm 'in' C
    after all, yes?

    Why do I care? That's because I want to be back in *exactly* the same
    state I've been in for the last 2 years.
    C was exclusively my system and boot partition. No E involved at all.
    E was just sitting patiently on my 2nd HD until some emergency (or
    experiment) prompted me to boot to it instead. So, as I didn't
    normally use the files on F either, only my 1st HD would actually be
    being accessed. The 2nd HD (XP calls it Disk 1 to confuse me) would
    just be spinning passively for most of the time. That's a mental
    picture with which I'm comfortable!

    Can anyone tell me if I'm already back in the required state, or
    whether I still need to do something clever/complex/risky, as several
    others in the XP groups have suggested?

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
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