White specks on lens.

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
very minute white specks all over the lens. I tried cleaning them off
with a lens cloth, but none of them even bother to streak, let alone
get cleaned off.

I did not notice these white specks before. There was a very small
and slight finger print that was made on the lens when my little girl
handled the camera (I've since told her that this camera is only for
dad and she can play with the 35mm camera to hear't content) and I was
able to clean that off without too much hassle with the lens cloth.
That was 3 days ago and didn't notice them then.

But I just inspected the lens and just noticed these white specks.
The specks don't show up at all in many different settings I took the
pictures in.

Are these specks supposed to be there and I just haven't noticed them
before or is there something wrong with my lens? I plan to take the
camera to the store I bought it from, but since I bought it from a big
electronics chain store and not a camera specialty shop, I doubt if
they're too informed about these things.

Oh, and while I have your attention, is it harmful to expose my
camera's lens to bright light/sunlight? Someone told me that I should
have filters for my lens if I'll be using it outdoors in sunny
condition to protect the lens. Is this true? Thanks for your time
and courtesy!
17 answers Last reply
More about white specks lens
  1. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 08:41:02 +0000, Steve Lee wrote:

    > I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    > very minute white specks all over the lens. ...

    Related to this issue: The first thing that should be done when buying any
    new camera is to buy it with a $10 UV or Skylight lens filter and
    immediately put that on the lens to protect the original optics.

    --
    "It said it needed Windows98 or better installed, so I installed Linux."
  2. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    could be inside the lense but out of focus when pictures are taken
    "Steve Lee" <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
    news:ke71h0lgdsptloj5amsb90qag463masvok@4ax.com...
    > I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    > very minute white specks all over the lens. I tried cleaning them off
    > with a lens cloth, but none of them even bother to streak, let alone
    > get cleaned off.
    >
    > I did not notice these white specks before. There was a very small
    > and slight finger print that was made on the lens when my little girl
    > handled the camera (I've since told her that this camera is only for
    > dad and she can play with the 35mm camera to hear't content) and I was
    > able to clean that off without too much hassle with the lens cloth.
    > That was 3 days ago and didn't notice them then.
    >
    > But I just inspected the lens and just noticed these white specks.
    > The specks don't show up at all in many different settings I took the
    > pictures in.
    >
    > Are these specks supposed to be there and I just haven't noticed them
    > before or is there something wrong with my lens? I plan to take the
    > camera to the store I bought it from, but since I bought it from a big
    > electronics chain store and not a camera specialty shop, I doubt if
    > they're too informed about these things.
    >
    > Oh, and while I have your attention, is it harmful to expose my
    > camera's lens to bright light/sunlight? Someone told me that I should
    > have filters for my lens if I'll be using it outdoors in sunny
    > condition to protect the lens. Is this true? Thanks for your time
    > and courtesy!
  3. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    "Steve Lee" <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
    news:ke71h0lgdsptloj5amsb90qag463masvok@4ax.com...
    > I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    > very minute white specks all over the lens. I tried cleaning them off
    > with a lens cloth, but none of them even bother to streak, let alone
    > get cleaned off.
    >
    > I did not notice these white specks before. There was a very small
    > and slight finger print that was made on the lens when my little girl
    > handled the camera (I've since told her that this camera is only for
    > dad and she can play with the 35mm camera to hear't content) and I was
    > able to clean that off without too much hassle with the lens cloth.
    > That was 3 days ago and didn't notice them then.
    >
    > But I just inspected the lens and just noticed these white specks.
    > The specks don't show up at all in many different settings I took the
    > pictures in.
    >
    > Are these specks supposed to be there and I just haven't noticed them
    > before or is there something wrong with my lens? I plan to take the
    > camera to the store I bought it from, but since I bought it from a big
    > electronics chain store and not a camera specialty shop, I doubt if
    > they're too informed about these things.
    >
    > Oh, and while I have your attention, is it harmful to expose my
    > camera's lens to bright light/sunlight? Someone told me that I should
    > have filters for my lens if I'll be using it outdoors in sunny
    > condition to protect the lens. Is this true? Thanks for your time
    > and courtesy!

    I don't think it will hurt the lens, but it could damage the sensor. My
    rule-of-thumb is not to point my digicam at anything so bright that I can't
    look at it.
  4. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    In article <ke71h0lgdsptloj5amsb90qag463masvok@4ax.com>, Steve Lee
    <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> writes
    >I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    >very minute white specks all over the lens. I tried cleaning them off
    >with a lens cloth, but none of them even bother to streak, let alone
    >get cleaned off.
    >
    >I did not notice these white specks before. There was a very small
    >and slight finger print that was made on the lens when my little girl
    >handled the camera (I've since told her that this camera is only for
    >dad and she can play with the 35mm camera to hear't content) and I was
    >able to clean that off without too much hassle with the lens cloth.
    >That was 3 days ago and didn't notice them then.
    >
    >But I just inspected the lens and just noticed these white specks.
    >The specks don't show up at all in many different settings I took the
    >pictures in.
    >
    >Are these specks supposed to be there and I just haven't noticed them
    >before or is there something wrong with my lens? I plan to take the
    >camera to the store I bought it from, but since I bought it from a big
    >electronics chain store and not a camera specialty shop, I doubt if
    >they're too informed about these things.
    >
    >Oh, and while I have your attention, is it harmful to expose my
    >camera's lens to bright light/sunlight? Someone told me that I should
    >have filters for my lens if I'll be using it outdoors in sunny
    >condition to protect the lens. Is this true? Thanks for your time
    >and courtesy!

    Don't know what your white specks might be. However, if they are small
    and don't cause any degradation of the image, I suggest you may do far
    more harm trying to remove them. In general, I am sure inexpert lens
    cleaning is one of the major causes of image degradation. The glass and
    coatings used for optical equipment tends to be quite soft and easy to
    scratch.

    If it were mine, I would very carefully try to remove one of them
    (preferably one at the edge of the lens) with water or saliva and then
    clean the spot gently with a microfibre lens cleaning cloth. If that
    worked, I would do the rest; if it had no effect, leave the others
    alone. (I might look at the spots under a microscope first in a case
    like this.) However, I have been a keen photographer for decades and
    have reasonable experience in cleaning lenses. If you do have a go, it
    is most important to remove all dust first, with an air duster (use
    ^upright^ and test on your hand first) otherwise your cleaning cloth
    will grind it into the coating. Use a microfibre lens cleaning cloth
    ^very gently^. Breathing on the lens immediately before applying the
    cloth can help to remove oily marks.

    In general - only clean a lens when you have to, and then carefully and
    gently.

    It is most emphatically not harmful to expose glass lenses to sunlight.
    However, a UV filter may be a good idea to protect it from fingerprints,
    dust, and especially salt water spray and sand on a beach. Remove the
    filter and clean it (with a micro-fibre lens cleaning cloth) if it gets
    dirty; if it gets damaged, replace it. A lens hood is also a good idea
    if the lens will take one.

    It is theoretically possible for plastic lenses to be damaged by long
    exposure to direct sunlight. However, I have never heard actual examples
    of this happening; the amount of time it would take would be very long.
    In any case, it is never a good idea to let cameras sit in direct
    sunlight unnecessarily, as they will get hot - very bad for film, and
    probably not very good for electronics, batteries and plastic bodies
    etc. (Not very good for human bodies either.)
    --
    David Littlewood
  5. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 06:53:39 -0500, Beowulf <beowulf@nowhere.net>
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 08:41:02 +0000, Steve Lee wrote:
    >
    >> I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    >> very minute white specks all over the lens. ...
    >
    >Related to this issue: The first thing that should be done when buying any
    >new camera is to buy it with a $10 UV or Skylight lens filter and
    >immediately put that on the lens to protect the original optics.

    Oh, I see. So, this UV/Skylight filter then is something I would use
    when outdoors on a sunny day or would I use it in general situation,
    except perhaps during the night? Thanks.
  6. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    "Steve Lee" <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
    news:5n82h0pckg500r7ok1ljk0vaj1n1jmns1d@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 06:53:39 -0500, Beowulf <beowulf@nowhere.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 08:41:02 +0000, Steve Lee wrote:
    > >
    > >> I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    > >> very minute white specks all over the lens. ...
    > >
    > >Related to this issue: The first thing that should be done when buying
    any
    > >new camera is to buy it with a $10 UV or Skylight lens filter and
    > >immediately put that on the lens to protect the original optics.
    >
    > Oh, I see. So, this UV/Skylight filter then is something I would use
    > when outdoors on a sunny day or would I use it in general situation,
    > except perhaps during the night? Thanks.

    By "protection"...that merely means that it PHYSICALLY protects from things
    like scratches and bumps. Being out-doors in bright sunlight will NOT
    damage your lens (unless you're pointing it at the sun for long
    periods--which will damage most cameras).
  7. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    "Steve Lee" <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
    > Oh, I see. So, this UV/Skylight filter then is something I would use
    > when outdoors on a sunny day or would I use it in general situation,
    > except perhaps during the night? Thanks.

    A UV filter does absolutely nothing for you other than to protect your lens
    (on film it helps filter out uv haze, but not anymore), so you just leave it
    on all the time and it protects your lens. Don't bother with a $10 one, get
    one that is multi-coated.
    Richard
  8. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    I had a similar problem on the same camera.
    I cleaned the fingerprints with Kodak photographic cleaning paper and it is
    now as clean as on the very first day.

    I agree on the principle on protecting the lens with a neutral UV filter,
    but I don't know how to do this on the DSC-W1:
    There is no filter thread on the font of the lens (only a 37mm thread on the
    body, probably to fix optical accessories for extending the zoom range.
    If somebody knows a place to buy filters that you can place once forever, I'
    a client !


    "Steve Lee" <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
    news:ke71h0lgdsptloj5amsb90qag463masvok@4ax.com...
    > I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    > very minute white specks all over the lens. I tried cleaning them off
    > with a lens cloth, but none of them even bother to streak, let alone
    > get cleaned off.
    >
    > I did not notice these white specks before. There was a very small
    > and slight finger print that was made on the lens when my little girl
    > handled the camera (I've since told her that this camera is only for
    > dad and she can play with the 35mm camera to hear't content) and I was
    > able to clean that off without too much hassle with the lens cloth.
    > That was 3 days ago and didn't notice them then.
    >
    > But I just inspected the lens and just noticed these white specks.
    > The specks don't show up at all in many different settings I took the
    > pictures in.
    >
    > Are these specks supposed to be there and I just haven't noticed them
    > before or is there something wrong with my lens? I plan to take the
    > camera to the store I bought it from, but since I bought it from a big
    > electronics chain store and not a camera specialty shop, I doubt if
    > they're too informed about these things.
    >
    > Oh, and while I have your attention, is it harmful to expose my
    > camera's lens to bright light/sunlight? Someone told me that I should
    > have filters for my lens if I'll be using it outdoors in sunny
    > condition to protect the lens. Is this true? Thanks for your time
    > and courtesy!
  9. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    On Wed, 4 Aug 2004 21:20:45 +0200, "Nadar" <nadar@skynet.be> wrote:

    >I had a similar problem on the same camera.
    >I cleaned the fingerprints with Kodak photographic cleaning paper and it is
    >now as clean as on the very first day.
    >
    >I agree on the principle on protecting the lens with a neutral UV filter,
    >but I don't know how to do this on the DSC-W1:
    >There is no filter thread on the font of the lens (only a 37mm thread on the
    >body, probably to fix optical accessories for extending the zoom range.
    >If somebody knows a place to buy filters that you can place once forever, I'
    >a client !

    I just dropped by a Sony store on the way home from work and the rep
    there took me Sony's website and showed me the 30mm adapter for W1.
    So, he placed an order for that along with the UV filter.

    Check out
    http://www.sonystyle.ca/commerce/servlet/CategoryDisplays?storeId=10001&langId=-1&catalogId=10001&categoryId=32244&navigationPath=32090n32230
    and scroll down until you see where it says " VADWA 30mm Lens Adapter
    for the DSCW1" And for the filter itself, check out
    http://www.sonystyle.ca/commerce/servlet/CategoryDisplays?storeId=10001&langId=-1&catalogId=10001&categoryId=47421&navigationPath=32090n32230
    and go to the very bottom and click on the VF30NK filter. (Sorry for
    the long links!)

    They're supposed to call me when the items come in. Keep in mind that
    this is Sony's website for Canada, so, if you're in the US, you should
    check the US website and locate the same items.

    Hope that helps.
  10. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    "Steve Lee" <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
    news:osc3h090ricuckkajcfdos59ehglmh2dj3@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 4 Aug 2004 21:20:45 +0200, "Nadar" <nadar@skynet.be> wrote:
    >
    > >I had a similar problem on the same camera.
    > >I cleaned the fingerprints with Kodak photographic cleaning paper and it
    is
    > >now as clean as on the very first day.
    > >
    > >I agree on the principle on protecting the lens with a neutral UV filter,
    > >but I don't know how to do this on the DSC-W1:
    > >There is no filter thread on the font of the lens (only a 37mm thread on
    the
    > >body, probably to fix optical accessories for extending the zoom range.
    > >If somebody knows a place to buy filters that you can place once forever,
    I'
    > >a client !
    >
    > I just dropped by a Sony store on the way home from work and the rep
    > there took me Sony's website and showed me the 30mm adapter for W1.
    > So, he placed an order for that along with the UV filter.
    >
    > Check out
    >
    http://www.sonystyle.ca/commerce/servlet/CategoryDisplays?storeId=10001&lang
    Id=-1&catalogId=10001&categoryId=32244&navigationPath=32090n32230
    > and scroll down until you see where it says " VADWA 30mm Lens Adapter
    > for the DSCW1" And for the filter itself, check out
    >
    http://www.sonystyle.ca/commerce/servlet/CategoryDisplays?storeId=10001&lang
    Id=-1&catalogId=10001&categoryId=47421&navigationPath=32090n32230
    > and go to the very bottom and click on the VF30NK filter. (Sorry for
    > the long links!)
    >
    > They're supposed to call me when the items come in. Keep in mind that
    > this is Sony's website for Canada, so, if you're in the US, you should
    > check the US website and locate the same items.
    >
    > Hope that helps.

    Thanks Steve.
    Unfortunately, this looks like the one I've found here in Europe: it's an
    accessory that you can place on top of the lens when the camera is switched
    on (and the lens out of the body). You must remove it before to switch off.
    I'm looking for a filter that stays in place all the time.
  11. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Steve Lee <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message news:<ke71h0lgdsptloj5amsb90qag463masvok@4ax.com>...
    > I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    > very minute white specks all over the lens. I tried cleaning them off
    > with a lens cloth, but none of them even bother to streak, let alone
    > get cleaned off.
    >
    > I did not notice these white specks before. There was a very small
    > and slight finger print that was made on the lens when my little girl
    > handled the camera (I've since told her that this camera is only for
    > dad and she can play with the 35mm camera to hear't content) and I was
    > able to clean that off without too much hassle with the lens cloth.
    > That was 3 days ago and didn't notice them then.
    >
    > But I just inspected the lens and just noticed these white specks.
    > The specks don't show up at all in many different settings I took the
    > pictures in.
    >
    > Are these specks supposed to be there and I just haven't noticed them
    > before or is there something wrong with my lens? I plan to take the
    > camera to the store I bought it from, but since I bought it from a big
    > electronics chain store and not a camera specialty shop, I doubt if
    > they're too informed about these things.
    >
    > Oh, and while I have your attention, is it harmful to expose my
    > camera's lens to bright light/sunlight? Someone told me that I should
    > have filters for my lens if I'll be using it outdoors in sunny
    > condition to protect the lens. Is this true? Thanks for your time
    > and courtesy!

    I don't think it's a photographic urban myth that the sun can be
    focused through a mounted lens and burn a hole in the focal plane
    shutter. However I'm not clear on wheather or not digital cameras have
    focal plane shutters. John
  12. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Steve Lee <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message news:<ke71h0lgdsptloj5amsb90qag463masvok@4ax.com>...
    > I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    > very minute white specks all over the lens. I tried cleaning them off
    > with a lens cloth, but none of them even bother to streak, let alone
    > get cleaned off.
    >
    > I did not notice these white specks before. There was a very small
    > and slight finger print that was made on the lens when my little girl
    > handled the camera (I've since told her that this camera is only for
    > dad and she can play with the 35mm camera to hear't content) and I was
    > able to clean that off without too much hassle with the lens cloth.
    > That was 3 days ago and didn't notice them then.
    >
    > But I just inspected the lens and just noticed these white specks.
    > The specks don't show up at all in many different settings I took the
    > pictures in.
    >
    > Are these specks supposed to be there and I just haven't noticed them
    > before or is there something wrong with my lens? I plan to take the
    > camera to the store I bought it from, but since I bought it from a big
    > electronics chain store and not a camera specialty shop, I doubt if
    > they're too informed about these things.
    >
    > Oh, and while I have your attention, is it harmful to expose my
    > camera's lens to bright light/sunlight? Someone told me that I should
    > have filters for my lens if I'll be using it outdoors in sunny
    > condition to protect the lens. Is this true? Thanks for your time
    > and courtesy!

    Also I forgot to mention in my earlier post that white specs that
    stick, sound suspiciously like ash from a forest fire. Have you had a
    fire around your neck of the woods? Having lived in Calif. for ~40 yrs
    I've had far too many opportunities to observe this phenomena. Good
    luck John
  13. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 15:40:30 +0200, "Nadar" <nadar@skynet.be> wrote:

    >Thanks Steve.
    >Unfortunately, this looks like the one I've found here in Europe: it's an
    >accessory that you can place on top of the lens when the camera is switched
    >on (and the lens out of the body). You must remove it before to switch off.
    >I'm looking for a filter that stays in place all the time.

    Oh, I see. Darn, sorry. And man, I didn't even consider that before.
    It sure would be inconvinient having to put the darn lenses on and
    off. I just assumed that you can leave them on all the time. Stupid
    me....ignorance always costs me like this. Damn!!
  14. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    In article <9ef657ec.0408060046.38b295d5@posting.google.com>, John
    McGraw <dudleydorite9@Yahoo.com> wrote:

    > I don't think it's a photographic urban myth that the sun can be
    > focused through a mounted lens and burn a hole in the focal plane
    > shutter. However I'm not clear on wheather or not digital cameras have
    > focal plane shutters. John

    I've seen it on old cameras that had rubberized cloth shutters. When
    they went to metal that seems to have fixed it.
  15. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    In article <9ef657ec.0408060046.38b295d5@posting.google.com>, John
    McGraw <dudleydorite9@Yahoo.com> writes
    >Steve Lee <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:<ke71h0lgdsptloj5amsb90qag463masvok@4ax.com>...
    >> I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    >> very minute white specks all over the lens. I tried cleaning them off
    >> with a lens cloth, but none of them even bother to streak, let alone
    >> get cleaned off.
    >>
    >> I did not notice these white specks before. There was a very small
    >> and slight finger print that was made on the lens when my little girl
    >> handled the camera (I've since told her that this camera is only for
    >> dad and she can play with the 35mm camera to hear't content) and I was
    >> able to clean that off without too much hassle with the lens cloth.
    >> That was 3 days ago and didn't notice them then.
    >>
    >> But I just inspected the lens and just noticed these white specks.
    >> The specks don't show up at all in many different settings I took the
    >> pictures in.
    >>
    >> Are these specks supposed to be there and I just haven't noticed them
    >> before or is there something wrong with my lens? I plan to take the
    >> camera to the store I bought it from, but since I bought it from a big
    >> electronics chain store and not a camera specialty shop, I doubt if
    >> they're too informed about these things.
    >>
    >> Oh, and while I have your attention, is it harmful to expose my
    >> camera's lens to bright light/sunlight? Someone told me that I should
    >> have filters for my lens if I'll be using it outdoors in sunny
    >> condition to protect the lens. Is this true? Thanks for your time
    >> and courtesy!
    >
    >I don't think it's a photographic urban myth that the sun can be
    >focused through a mounted lens and burn a hole in the focal plane
    >shutter. However I'm not clear on wheather or not digital cameras have
    >focal plane shutters. John

    DSLRs do, others don't.

    The damage to FP shutters was mostly a feature of cloth shutters which
    were used in the 1970s and early 80s. From then on, most use metal
    bladed shutters, which would not have holes burned in them by focussed
    sunlight. However, direct sunlight can cause all sorts of other problems
    (heating, deterioration of lubricating oils, photochemical oxidation of
    plastics etc.) so it is ^never^ a good idea to leave cameras exposed to
    sunlight unnecessarily.
    --
    David Littlewood
  16. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    On 6 Aug 2004 01:57:34 -0700, dudleydorite9@Yahoo.com (John McGraw)
    wrote:

    >Steve Lee <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message news:<ke71h0lgdsptloj5amsb90qag463masvok@4ax.com>...
    >> I just bought a Sony DSC-W1 not two weeks ago and just noticed these
    [snip]
    >> Oh, and while I have your attention, is it harmful to expose my
    >> camera's lens to bright light/sunlight? Someone told me that I should
    >> have filters for my lens if I'll be using it outdoors in sunny
    >> condition to protect the lens. Is this true? Thanks for your time
    >> and courtesy!
    >
    >Also I forgot to mention in my earlier post that white specs that
    >stick, sound suspiciously like ash from a forest fire. Have you had a
    >fire around your neck of the woods? Having lived in Calif. for ~40 yrs
    >I've had far too many opportunities to observe this phenomena. Good
    >luck John

    Nope, no forest fires, but still, you're kind of close. It still had
    to do with nature anyway. They were some fine mists of water that had
    dried up on the lens. I had just come back from a camping trip and
    one of the hikes we took led us to a waterfall and I didn't got around
    to putting away the camera before some fine mists were felt in the
    air.

    I got them off now, but not before I had an interesting experience. I
    posted the below at rec.photo.misc. I don't think I'll ever be going
    back to that supposed camera specialty shop again.

    Thanks for all the replies!
    ==========
    I just dropped by a what is supposedly a camera specialty shop in town
    to have these white specks on the lens of my camera looked at because
    I was having difficulty wiping them off with my microfiber cleaning
    cloth.

    When the clerk took a look at my camera, she told me it's just some
    fine mist that dried out on the lens and said that they can just be
    wiped off. Then to my horror, she pinched a corner the sweater she
    was wearing and proceeded to rub the phuqing lens with it!!!

    Considering how the rep worked in a camera specialty shop, shouldn't
    she have grabbed a lens cleaning cloth, such as the microfiber one I
    have, and clean the lens with that??? I mean, can you think of anyone
    who supposedly knows anything about cameras just clean their lens with
    some sweater they're wearing???

    I felt like yanking the camera away from her, but remained calm and
    suggested the microfiber cloth I had in the case. She then said that
    she had a better idea and came back with a Q-Tip and started to rub
    the lens with it. Is Q-Tip normally used without any solvent or
    cleaning agents? She rubbed a totally dry Q-Tip on the lens. Is this
    safe?

    Once she finished, I walked out of the store, went straight to a
    restroom (this supposed camera specialty shop's in a mall) and checked
    out the lens. There are no visible scratches on the lens, but I was
    told that some scratches on a lens aren't necessarily visible to the
    human eye because they're so fine, but it's still damaged the lens.

    Are there ways to check whether my lens have been scratched at all?
    Thanks.
  17. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    "Steve Lee" <NOLIKEsteve.leeSPAM@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
    > Oh, I see. Darn, sorry. And man, I didn't even consider that before.
    > It sure would be inconvinient having to put the darn lenses on and
    > off. I just assumed that you can leave them on all the time. Stupid
    > me....ignorance always costs me like this. Damn!!

    Well, you could leave the filter on the adapter. That should only take a
    couple of seconds to pop on.
    Richard
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