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Convert 35mm Slides to JPEG

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Anonymous
August 8, 2004 8:51:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

Anyone have a favored way to convert several hundred old 35mm slides to
digital format? I see various places on-line offer to do it for 45c-50c per
slide though I don't know how well they do it.

Alternatively is there some recommended hardware to scan them that does a
decent job, but is inexpensive?

Finally, how well does it work to just project the slides and snap pictures
of them with a digital camera?

Thanks...

Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)
Anonymous
August 8, 2004 8:51:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

Bill Martin <wylie@earthlink.net> wrote in
news:MPG.1b80241525a481419896ce@news.east.earthlink.net:

> Anyone have a favored way to convert several hundred old 35mm slides
> to digital format? I see various places on-line offer to do it for
> 45c-50c per slide though I don't know how well they do it.
>
> Alternatively is there some recommended hardware to scan them that
> does a decent job, but is inexpensive?
>
> Finally, how well does it work to just project the slides and snap
> pictures of them with a digital camera?
>
> Thanks...
>
> Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)
>

I tried several things. First, I tried lots of suggestions by people over
the internet using my regular flat bed scanner (results were not good),
Second, I tried taking a pic of the projected image using a tripod and the
timer so as to not get any movement with a 2.1 mp camera and the results
were pretty good, Thirdly, I bought a flat bed scanner that scans 35 mm
pics for probably less than $60 and it works great. It is one at a time
however.

--
" Location 75 miles north of New Orleans "
Anonymous
August 9, 2004 10:51:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

> I tried several things. First, I tried lots of suggestions by people over
> the internet using my regular flat bed scanner (results were not good),
> Second, I tried taking a pic of the projected image using a tripod and the
> timer so as to not get any movement with a 2.1 mp camera and the results
> were pretty good, Thirdly, I bought a flat bed scanner that scans 35 mm
> pics for probably less than $60 and it works great. It is one at a time
> however.

Thanks for the feedback Paul. I've been considering getting a low end film
scanner which also does slides, but I don't know how well they work. Nobody
I know has one.

My experience trying to photograph the slides has not been overly impressive
either. My normal flat bed scanner is a non starter. What kind of flat bed
did you get that does slides acceptably?

Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)
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Anonymous
August 9, 2004 11:14:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

I had many old family slides that I wanted to convert to digital so I could
throw out my decrepit screen and obsolete projector. I bought a "One Touch"
Visioner flat bed scanner from Sam's Club and used it fairly successfully.
The scanner will scan photos, color slides and color negs if you want. I
think it was around $90 or so. Experiment a little.

"Bill Martin" <wylie@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:MPG.1b8191772ecbeef79896cf@news.east.earthlink.net...
> > I tried several things. First, I tried lots of suggestions by people
over
> > the internet using my regular flat bed scanner (results were not good),
> > Second, I tried taking a pic of the projected image using a tripod and
the
> > timer so as to not get any movement with a 2.1 mp camera and the results
> > were pretty good, Thirdly, I bought a flat bed scanner that scans 35 mm
> > pics for probably less than $60 and it works great. It is one at a time
> > however.
>
> Thanks for the feedback Paul. I've been considering getting a low end
film
> scanner which also does slides, but I don't know how well they work.
Nobody
> I know has one.
>
> My experience trying to photograph the slides has not been overly
impressive
> either. My normal flat bed scanner is a non starter. What kind of flat
bed
> did you get that does slides acceptably?
>
> Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 3:49:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 18:51:21 GMT, Bill Martin <wylie@earthlink.net>
wrote:

>> I tried several things. First, I tried lots of suggestions by people over
>> the internet using my regular flat bed scanner (results were not good),
>> Second, I tried taking a pic of the projected image using a tripod and the
>> timer so as to not get any movement with a 2.1 mp camera and the results
>> were pretty good, Thirdly, I bought a flat bed scanner that scans 35 mm
>> pics for probably less than $60 and it works great. It is one at a time
>> however.
>
>Thanks for the feedback Paul. I've been considering getting a low end film
>scanner which also does slides, but I don't know how well they work. Nobody
>I know has one.
>
>My experience trying to photograph the slides has not been overly impressive
>either. My normal flat bed scanner is a non starter. What kind of flat bed
>did you get that does slides acceptably?
>
>Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)

I've read the user comments for a couple of years and my consensus
is that the epson flatbed scanners are the best non-film scanner.
Don't know why. The more expensive flatbed scanners come with
software that 'fixes' image problems such as dust.
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 7:23:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

> I had many old family slides that I wanted to convert to digital so I could
> throw out my decrepit screen and obsolete projector. I bought a "One Touch"
> Visioner flat bed scanner from Sam's Club and used it fairly successfully.
> The scanner will scan photos, color slides and color negs if you want. I
> think it was around $90 or so. Experiment a little.

Thanks Ed. Was you Visioneer an 8920 by chance? Did it scan your slides
acceptably "out of the box" or did you have to do a lot of putzing around
with color balance and such?

Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 7:23:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

Yes, it was an 8920 Visioneer. As far as the quality of reproduction is
concerned, beauty is in the eye of the beholder (especially in the quality
of the photographs) but I was satisfied. It enabled me to "keep" those
slides many years old. The quality had degraded a little (A lot in the case
of Ektachrome).
"Bill Martin" <wylie@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:MPG.1b82b261cb5a65159896d0@news.east.earthlink.net...
> > I had many old family slides that I wanted to convert to digital so I
could
> > throw out my decrepit screen and obsolete projector. I bought a "One
Touch"
> > Visioner flat bed scanner from Sam's Club and used it fairly
successfully.
> > The scanner will scan photos, color slides and color negs if you want.
I
> > think it was around $90 or so. Experiment a little.
>
> Thanks Ed. Was you Visioneer an 8920 by chance? Did it scan your slides
> acceptably "out of the box" or did you have to do a lot of putzing around
> with color balance and such?
>
> Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 8:23:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

I have a Minolta Dimage Scan Duet III (slide scanner and more).
Works great, does 5 slides at a time. Cost is more than $60 but if you have
a few hundred slides its worth the cost. Check the net for the best price.
Buy one and after you finish with it, turn around and sell it on eBay.

Good Luck


"Bill Martin" <wylie@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:MPG.1b8191772ecbeef79896cf@news.east.earthlink.net...
> > I tried several things. First, I tried lots of suggestions by people
over
> > the internet using my regular flat bed scanner (results were not good),
> > Second, I tried taking a pic of the projected image using a tripod and
the
> > timer so as to not get any movement with a 2.1 mp camera and the results
> > were pretty good, Thirdly, I bought a flat bed scanner that scans 35 mm
> > pics for probably less than $60 and it works great. It is one at a time
> > however.
>
> Thanks for the feedback Paul. I've been considering getting a low end
film
> scanner which also does slides, but I don't know how well they work.
Nobody
> I know has one.
>
> My experience trying to photograph the slides has not been overly
impressive
> either. My normal flat bed scanner is a non starter. What kind of flat
bed
> did you get that does slides acceptably?
>
> Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)
Anonymous
August 30, 2004 1:21:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

Go to your local photo shop, and let them make a photo cd for you.
they have access to professional quality film scanners, and can make a
lot better quality than any flatbed.
- and it's cheap.


On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 16:51:50 GMT, Bill Martin <wylie@earthlink.net>
wrote:

>Anyone have a favored way to convert several hundred old 35mm slides to
>digital format? I see various places on-line offer to do it for 45c-50c per
>slide though I don't know how well they do it.
>
>Alternatively is there some recommended hardware to scan them that does a
>decent job, but is inexpensive?
>
>Finally, how well does it work to just project the slides and snap pictures
>of them with a digital camera?
>
>Thanks...
>
>Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)
Anonymous
August 31, 2004 10:35:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 16:51:50 GMT, Bill Martin <wylie@earthlink.net>
wrote:

> Anyone have a favored way to convert several hundred old 35mm slides
> to digital format? I see various places on-line offer to do it for
> 45c-50c per slide though I don't know how well they do it.

This would be my first choice, provided it's within your budget. The
quality may be good, or not. Do a google search and check for companies
that get good mention on the net, or send in a small number of slides and
see how the quality is.

> Alternatively is there some recommended hardware to scan them that
> does a decent job, but is inexpensive?

The cheapest path is probably to buy a 35mm scanner on eBay, such as the
Nikon Ls-30, then resell it on eBay for about the same as you paid. Don't
ignore the hidden cost of your own labor. It will take about two to four
minutes of your time dusting, scanning, color adjusting, and retouching each
image. For several hundred slides this can take a week or two of continuous
effort, and this is tedious work that gets very old very fast.

> Finally, how well does it work to just project the slides and snap
> pictures of them with a digital camera?

I've dont this, and yes, it works and can be much faster than using a
scanner. Macro copying of slides can work very well indeed if your camera
has good macro capability. Be sure to use plenty of light, a low ISO
setting, backlight with filtered daylight, not a tungsten bulb, otherwise
the blue channel will be lacking.
--

Mike Russell
www.curvemeister.com
www.geigy.2y.net
August 31, 2004 2:47:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

Mike's observation about the time to scan and adjust each slide is very
true. Of course that is time that the place you pay isn't going to
spend. They aren't going to make adjustments to your slide in the
scanning process. You don't have to either. Depends on the quality you
want, and since they're your slides it is hard not to want to make each
one as good as possible. During the scanning step you'll have the
ability to adjust color and crop, and possibly do some automated
scratch/dust removal. You'll probably still wind up further retouching
many of your slides in your photoediting software, regardless of where
they are scanned.

Bernie

Mike Russell wrote:
> On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 16:51:50 GMT, Bill Martin <wylie@earthlink.net>
> wrote:
>
>
>>Anyone have a favored way to convert several hundred old 35mm slides
>>to digital format? I see various places on-line offer to do it for
>>45c-50c per slide though I don't know how well they do it.
>
>
> This would be my first choice, provided it's within your budget. The
> quality may be good, or not. Do a google search and check for companies
> that get good mention on the net, or send in a small number of slides and
> see how the quality is.
>
>
>>Alternatively is there some recommended hardware to scan them that
>>does a decent job, but is inexpensive?
>
>
> The cheapest path is probably to buy a 35mm scanner on eBay, such as the
> Nikon Ls-30, then resell it on eBay for about the same as you paid. Don't
> ignore the hidden cost of your own labor. It will take about two to four
> minutes of your time dusting, scanning, color adjusting, and retouching each
> image. For several hundred slides this can take a week or two of continuous
> effort, and this is tedious work that gets very old very fast.
>
>
>>Finally, how well does it work to just project the slides and snap
>>pictures of them with a digital camera?
>
>
> I've dont this, and yes, it works and can be much faster than using a
> scanner. Macro copying of slides can work very well indeed if your camera
> has good macro capability. Be sure to use plenty of light, a low ISO
> setting, backlight with filtered daylight, not a tungsten bulb, otherwise
> the blue channel will be lacking.
!