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Seagate five year warranties not all they seem (The Inquir..

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Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 9, 2004 10:31:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Seagate five year warranties not all they seem

http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=20139
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 9, 2004 10:31:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Tod wrote:

> Seagate five year warranties not all they seem
>
> http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=20139

And you believe this is news why?

OEM hardware carries a warranty that is defined by the contract between
Seagate and the OEM. Always has been, always will be unless there is a
statute in force that overrides the contract. The same is true for Western
Digital, Hitachi, Samsung, Maxtor, and every other drive manufacturer. In
some cases when you purchase and install OEM hardware you are acting as the
systems integrator and thus it is warranted to to you, in other cases it is
warranted to a computer manufacturer.

This is nothing new and has been discussed ad nauseum.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 9, 2004 10:31:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

In article <cpahtm02n2k@news2.newsguy.com>,
J. Clarke <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>Tod wrote:
>
>> Seagate five year warranties not all they seem
>>
>> http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=20139
>
>And you believe this is news why?
>
>OEM hardware carries a warranty that is defined by the contract between
>Seagate and the OEM. Always has been, always will be unless there is a
>statute in force that overrides the contract. The same is true for Western
>Digital, Hitachi, Samsung, Maxtor, and every other drive manufacturer. In
>some cases when you purchase and install OEM hardware you are acting as the
>systems integrator and thus it is warranted to to you, in other cases it is
>warranted to a computer manufacturer.
>
>This is nothing new and has been discussed ad nauseum.
>
>--
>--John
>Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
>(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)

If CDW (where the disks were bought) misrepresented these disks as
Retail then they may have to make good.

--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
Related resources
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 9, 2004 10:31:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

J. Clarke wrote:
> Tod wrote:
>
> > Seagate five year warranties not all they seem
> >
> > http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=20139
>
> And you believe this is news why?
>
> OEM hardware carries a warranty that is defined by the contract
between
> Seagate and the OEM. Always has been, always will be unless there is
a
> statute in force that overrides the contract. The same is true for
Western
> Digital, Hitachi, Samsung, Maxtor, and every other drive
manufacturer. In
> some cases when you purchase and install OEM hardware you are acting
as the
> systems integrator and thus it is warranted to to you, in other cases
it is
> warranted to a computer manufacturer.
>
> This is nothing new and has been discussed ad nauseum.
>
> --
> --John
> Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)


When I bought my Seagate retail drive, in the documentation it also
mentioned that seagate would not accept drives sent in without the
proper shipping protection.

This was taking from their website at the listed url below the quote:
Warranty is void if the SeaShield cover or top cover, or any seal or
label is removed or damaged, if it is improperly packaged, or if the
drive experiences shock in excess of its Gs rating.
http://seagate.com/support/service/shipping.html

I will let all you hard drive professionals determine what that means,
all I can say is I hope you insure your RMA packages for the proper
cost. If the drive is defective and does not work, proving it was done
in shipping could be hard to do. So to me this really means say in 3 to
4 years your drive fails, and Seagate does not offer that drive
anymore, or its a problem drive then this could result in a reduction
of claims, due to Seagate using this little information about shipping.

I also bet that other drive manufactures might have similar shipping
clauses in their docs but I clearly remember Seagate for the above
reason, and do not remember others such as Maxtors.

Rthoreau
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 12:22:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<rthoreau@iwon.com> wrote in message
news:1102644603.424355.172630@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
> When I bought my Seagate retail drive, in the documentation it also
> mentioned that seagate would not accept drives sent in without the
> proper shipping protection.

We RMA a lot of Seagate drives that we buy as scrap and ship them in an
original Seagate clamshell case or one from another manufacturer and have
never had any problems. Seagate promptly returns to us a factory
refurbished drive ready for deployment or sale.

Rita
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 3:37:18 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

rthoreau@iwon.com wrote:

> J. Clarke wrote:
>> Tod wrote:
>>
>> > Seagate five year warranties not all they seem
>> >
>> > http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=20139
>>
>> And you believe this is news why?
>>
>> OEM hardware carries a warranty that is defined by the contract
> between
>> Seagate and the OEM. Always has been, always will be unless there is
> a
>> statute in force that overrides the contract. The same is true for
> Western
>> Digital, Hitachi, Samsung, Maxtor, and every other drive
> manufacturer. In
>> some cases when you purchase and install OEM hardware you are acting
> as the
>> systems integrator and thus it is warranted to to you, in other cases
> it is
>> warranted to a computer manufacturer.
>>
>> This is nothing new and has been discussed ad nauseum.
>>
>> --
>> --John
>> Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
>> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
>
>
> When I bought my Seagate retail drive, in the documentation it also
> mentioned that seagate would not accept drives sent in without the
> proper shipping protection.
>
> This was taking from their website at the listed url below the quote:
> Warranty is void if the SeaShield cover or top cover, or any seal or
> label is removed or damaged, if it is improperly packaged, or if the
> drive experiences shock in excess of its Gs rating.
> http://seagate.com/support/service/shipping.html
>
> I will let all you hard drive professionals determine what that means,
> all I can say is I hope you insure your RMA packages for the proper
> cost. If the drive is defective and does not work, proving it was done
> in shipping could be hard to do. So to me this really means say in 3 to
> 4 years your drive fails, and Seagate does not offer that drive
> anymore, or its a problem drive then this could result in a reduction
> of claims, due to Seagate using this little information about shipping.

Those provisions are also standard, all drive manufacturers have pretty much
the same restrictions. If there is any question concerning the adequacy of
your packing then spend the 8 bucks for the approved packing
<http://www.seagate.com/support/service/packaging.html&g...;.

> I also bet that other drive manufactures might have similar shipping
> clauses in their docs but I clearly remember Seagate for the above
> reason, and do not remember others such as Maxtors.

Well, check again. Maxtor's not going to fix a drive that had had the
capsule opened (which is what the stuff about seals is intended to prevent)
or which is shipped loose in a box with no padding.

Their specific provisions are: "This warranty does not cover any of the
following conditions:

Abuse, unreasonable use, mistreatment, or neglect
Unusual physical or electrical stress or power fluctuations
Damage caused during installation of the Product
Damage or capacity/performance/operational resetting caused by the equipment
or system with which the Product is used
Damage caused by modification or repair not made or authorized by Maxtor
Products whose Maxtor Serial Number and/or Material Number label have been
removed, torn or defaced
Damage caused by use of non-Maxtor packaging
Damage caused by improper or improperly used packaging
Damage caused by lack of ESD protection
Products that are determined to be stolen.
Further, this limited warranty is void if the Product cover, or any label or
seal on the Product, is removed or damaged."

With regard to packaging, there is an additional statement: "The Product
must be properly packaged in Maxtor or Maxtor-approved packaging, with the
Return Material Authorization clearly displayed on the outside of the
packaging, to obtain warranty service. "
>
> Rthoreau

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 6:02:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Sounds like good business sense, have all the legal and warranty stuff up
front,
but also have good customer service by taking care of them without a hassle.

"Rita Ä Berkowitz" <ritaberk20O4@aol.com> wrote in message
news:10ri24h3pt8mk5d@news.supernews.com...
> <rthoreau@iwon.com> wrote in message
> news:1102644603.424355.172630@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>>
>> When I bought my Seagate retail drive, in the documentation it also
>> mentioned that seagate would not accept drives sent in without the
>> proper shipping protection.
>
> We RMA a lot of Seagate drives that we buy as scrap and ship them in an
> original Seagate clamshell case or one from another manufacturer and have
> never had any problems. Seagate promptly returns to us a factory
> refurbished drive ready for deployment or sale.
>
> Rita
>
>
>
!