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WD drive causing WinXP lockup

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Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 2:31:25 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Have an ABIT BE6 mb.
Presently I have this IDE/ATA configuration -
IDE3 master(ATA) - 80GB with 2 partitions of 40GB. First is Win98se and second
just for data.(C: & F:) 
IDE3 slave (ATA) - 12GB just for data. (D:) 
IDE4 master(ATA) - 120GB just for data (E:) 
(All FAT32)

IDE1 & 2 - Total of 3 cd/dvd burners/drives. (W:, X:, Y:) 
Have the latest Highpoint controller s/w for this board (V1.25)and Win98se.

Recently made some changes, putting the 120GB as IDE3 slave and the 12GB as IDE4
master. All OK.
Wanted to install WinXP on the 12GB so, to be safe, unplugged all the other
hd's. Installed Win XP using Highpoint drivers (F6) for Win2000 that I was told
would work OK.
Everything installed OK
Start plugging in the hd's.
All is OK except if I plug in the 120 GB. This is a Western Digital 7200 Eide.
With this drive plugged in and booting to Win98se all is OK. However, booting to
WinXP won't work. Gets to the WinXP splash screen and locks up. Unplug just this
drive and WinXP boots fine and see's the 80GB with the Win98se and data
partitions.
Any ideas?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 2:31:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<JPW> wrote:
> Have an ABIT BE6 mb.
> Presently I have this IDE/ATA configuration -
> IDE3 master(ATA) - 80GB with 2 partitions of 40GB.
> First is Win98se and second just for data.(C: & F:) 
> IDE3 slave (ATA) - 12GB just for data. (D:) 
> IDE4 master(ATA) - 120GB just for data (E:) 
> (All FAT32)
>
> IDE1 & 2 - Total of 3 cd/dvd burners/drives. (W:, X:, Y:) 
> Have the latest Highpoint controller s/w for this board
> (V1.25)and Win98se.
>
> Recently made some changes, putting the 120GB as
> IDE3 slave and the 12GB as IDE4 master. All OK.


So now you have:
Ultra DMA 33 IDE channels 1 & 2 - 3 ATAPI devices
Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Master - Win98SE, data
Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Slave - 120GB data
Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 4, Master - 12GB data (->WinXP)


> Wanted to install WinXP on the 12GB so, to be safe,
> unplugged all the other hd's. Installed Win XP using
> Highpoint drivers (F6) for Win2000 that I was told
> would work OK.
> Everything installed OK
>
> Start plugging in the hd's.
> All is OK except if I plug in the 120 GB.
> This is a Western Digital 7200 Eide.
> With this drive plugged in and booting to Win98se all is OK.
> However, booting to WinXP won't work.
> Gets to the WinXP splash screen and locks up.
> Unplug just this drive and WinXP boots fine and
> see's the 80GB with the Win98se and data partitions.
> Any ideas?


Yeah. Boot.ini on the WinXP partition thinks that it's
on the 2nd HD in the boot sequence. When the 120GB
HD isn't there, WinXP *is* on the 2nd HD (i.e. rdisk(1) ),
but when the 120GB HD is there, *it* is the the 2nd HD
in the boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(1) ), and WinXP's boot
manager sends control to the wrong HD. Just change
the rdisk value boot.ini which refers to the WinXP HD
to "rdisk(2)", i.e. the 3rd HD relative to the start of the
HD boot sequence. Boot.ini can be found just below
the root in WinXP's file structure. You can easily edit
it with Notepad.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 7:09:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 23:09:22 -0800, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

><JPW> wrote:
>> Have an ABIT BE6 mb.
>> Presently I have this IDE/ATA configuration -
>> IDE3 master(ATA) - 80GB with 2 partitions of 40GB.
>> First is Win98se and second just for data.(C: & F:) 
>> IDE3 slave (ATA) - 12GB just for data. (D:) 
>> IDE4 master(ATA) - 120GB just for data (E:) 
>> (All FAT32)
>>
>> IDE1 & 2 - Total of 3 cd/dvd burners/drives. (W:, X:, Y:) 
>> Have the latest Highpoint controller s/w for this board
>> (V1.25)and Win98se.
>>
>> Recently made some changes, putting the 120GB as
>> IDE3 slave and the 12GB as IDE4 master. All OK.
>
>
> So now you have:
> Ultra DMA 33 IDE channels 1 & 2 - 3 ATAPI devices
> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Master - Win98SE, data
> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Slave - 120GB data
> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 4, Master - 12GB data (->WinXP)
>
>
>> Wanted to install WinXP on the 12GB so, to be safe,
>> unplugged all the other hd's. Installed Win XP using
>> Highpoint drivers (F6) for Win2000 that I was told
>> would work OK.
>> Everything installed OK
>>
>> Start plugging in the hd's.
>> All is OK except if I plug in the 120 GB.
>> This is a Western Digital 7200 Eide.
>> With this drive plugged in and booting to Win98se all is OK.
>> However, booting to WinXP won't work.
>> Gets to the WinXP splash screen and locks up.
>> Unplug just this drive and WinXP boots fine and
>> see's the 80GB with the Win98se and data partitions.
>> Any ideas?
>
>
> Yeah. Boot.ini on the WinXP partition thinks that it's
> on the 2nd HD in the boot sequence. When the 120GB
> HD isn't there, WinXP *is* on the 2nd HD (i.e. rdisk(1) ),
> but when the 120GB HD is there, *it* is the the 2nd HD
> in the boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(1) ), and WinXP's boot
> manager sends control to the wrong HD. Just change
> the rdisk value boot.ini which refers to the WinXP HD
> to "rdisk(2)", i.e. the 3rd HD relative to the start of the
> HD boot sequence. Boot.ini can be found just below
> the root in WinXP's file structure. You can easily edit
> it with Notepad.
>
>*TimDaniels*
Tim,
Got myself in a bit of a pickle here :-(.
I unplugged the 120GB so I could boot to WinXP. Here's the contents of Boot.ini
-
boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional"
/fastdetect

Something I didn't mention but may be of importance - I use the Highpoint ATA
boot screen to change the boot drive. After choosing the drive to boot from,
that drive becomes the C: drive and the other drive letters change accordingly.
My BIOS is set to boot from C: first. So after making the change the system
reboots from whatever drive has become C:..

Is this why it says rdisk(0)?

My "pickle" is that I changed it to rdisk(1) in both lines (stupid!); powered
down; hooked the 120GB back and rebooted.
Now I get a message -
"Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt:
<windows root>\system32\hal.dll
Please reinstall a copy of the file."

Don't know how I can get back in to change the boot.ini as Win98se doesn't
recognize the drive as it is NTFS. Should I just try to reinstall WinXP?
Related resources
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 7:10:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<JPW> got pickled:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>JPW> wrote:
>>> Have an ABIT BE6 mb.
>>> Presently I have this IDE/ATA configuration -
>>> IDE3 master(ATA) - 80GB with 2 partitions of 40GB.
>>> First is Win98se and second just for data.(C: & F:) 
>>> IDE3 slave (ATA) - 12GB just for data. (D:) 
>>> IDE4 master(ATA) - 120GB just for data (E:) 
>>> (All FAT32)
>>>
>>> IDE1 & 2 - Total of 3 cd/dvd burners/drives. (W:, X:, Y:) 
>>> Have the latest Highpoint controller s/w for this board
>>> (V1.25)and Win98se.
>>>
>>> Recently made some changes, putting the 120GB as
>>> IDE3 slave and the 12GB as IDE4 master. All OK.
>>
>>
>> So now you have:
>> Ultra DMA 33 IDE channels 1 & 2 - 3 ATAPI devices
>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Master - Win98SE, data
>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Slave - 120GB data
>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 4, Master - 12GB data (->WinXP)
>>
>>
>>> Wanted to install WinXP on the 12GB so, to be safe,
>>> unplugged all the other hd's. Installed Win XP using
>>> Highpoint drivers (F6) for Win2000 that I was told
>>> would work OK.
>>> Everything installed OK
>>>
>>> Start plugging in the hd's.
>>> All is OK except if I plug in the 120 GB.
>>> This is a Western Digital 7200 Eide.
>>> With this drive plugged in and booting to Win98se all is OK.
>>> However, booting to WinXP won't work.
>>> Gets to the WinXP splash screen and locks up.
>>> Unplug just this drive and WinXP boots fine and
>>> see's the 80GB with the Win98se and data partitions.
>>> Any ideas?
>>
>>
>> Yeah. Boot.ini on the WinXP partition thinks that it's
>> on the 2nd HD in the boot sequence. When the 120GB
>> HD isn't there, WinXP *is* on the 2nd HD (i.e. rdisk(1) ),
>> but when the 120GB HD is there, *it* is the the 2nd HD
>> in the boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(1) ), and WinXP's boot
>> manager sends control to the wrong HD. Just change
>> the rdisk value boot.ini which refers to the WinXP HD
>> to "rdisk(2)", i.e. the 3rd HD relative to the start of the
>> HD boot sequence. Boot.ini can be found just below
>> the root in WinXP's file structure. You can easily edit
>> it with Notepad.
>>
>>*TimDaniels*
>
> Tim,
> Got myself in a bit of a pickle here :-(.
> I unplugged the 120GB so I could boot to WinXP.
> Here's the contents of Boot.ini
> -
> boot loader]
> timeout=30
> default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
> [operating systems]
> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS=
> "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
>
> Something I didn't mention but may be of importance -
> I use the Highpoint ATA boot screen to change the boot
> drive. After choosing the drive to boot from,
> that drive becomes the C: drive and the other drive letters
> change accordingly.
> My BIOS is set to boot from C: first. So after making the
> change the system reboots from whatever drive has
> become C:..
>
> Is this why it says rdisk(0)?


The OS sets the drive letter, so your BIOS boots the
ntldr in the "active" partition of the HD at the head of
its boot sequence. The Highpoint BIOS apparently
passes its boot sequence on to the mb's BIOS which
then uses that as its HD boot sequence. During your
WinXP installation, the 1st partition on your 120GB HD
was marked "active" and boot.ini, ntldr and ntdetect.com
were put just under the root of its file system. And since
it was the only HD in the PC at the time - and thus at the
head of the boot sequence - rdisk() in the boot.ini file
was set to rdisk(0) to indicate that the OS could be found
at the 0th position in the boot sequence, and patition()
was set to parition(1) to mean that the OS could be found
in the 1st partition of that HD.


> My "pickle" is that I changed it to rdisk(1) in both lines (stupid!);
> powered down; hooked the 120GB back and rebooted.
> Now I get a message -
> "Windows could not start because the following file is
> missing or corrupt: <windows root>\system32\hal.dll
> Please reinstall a copy of the file."
>
> Don't know how I can get back in to change the boot.ini
> as Win98se doesn't recognize the drive as it is NTFS.
> Should I just try to reinstall WinXP?


When you plugged in other drives ahead of it (in terms
of S-ATA channel position) on the Highpoint controller
card, you changed the boot sequence that it reported
to the mb's BIOS. With the Win98SE HD at the head
of the sequence, it was where it used to be, and it
booted fine. When you had the 120GB with WinXP
there (where it was 1st installed), the WinXP booted
fine. This "fine" position is at rdisk(0)partition(1).

Now the boot.ini file in the 120GB HD says it's at
position rdisk(1)partition(1), but it's not there - it's at
position rdisk(0)partition(1) when it's the only HD in
the system. Try putting it in the boot sequence that
Highpoint reports by plugging another HD into the
Highpoint card and manually setting its BIOS's boot
sequence so that the 120GB HD *is* at the 1th position
(i.e. at the 2nd relative position in the boot sequence).
That should get your WinXP booted.

Then reset the rdisk() values to rdisk(0) in both the
"default=" line and the "[operating systems]" line, and
put your 120GB drive at the head of the boot sequence -
either manually by adjusting the Highpoint BIOS, or by
physical channel position.

Dual booting:

If you want to maintain 2 OSes and dual boot to either
of them at startup, add another line to the boot.ini file
in the 120GB HD that says:

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS=
"Windows 98SE" /fastdetect

This says that the Win98SE system is on the 2nd HD
in the 1st partition. Change the default line back to
rdisk(0) like so:

default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS

Then change the timeout value to 20 seconds since
NOBODY needs 30 seconds to decide which OS to
boot. :-)

Then put in the other HDs at subsequent positions.
That will send control to your WinXP boot manager at
startup, and WinXP's boot manager will give you the
option of booting to your WinXP system (its default
system), or to your Win98SE system on the 2nd HD.

You can rearrange the non-WinXP drives if you want,
but just maintain the WinXP HD at the head of the boot
sequence, and keep the boot.ini file in the WinXP HD
pointing to the correct position in the boot sequence
for the Win98SE HD.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 7:10:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<JPW> wrote in message news:s53kr01gr3k38ulpbfk90dcuaudgpm4e7c@4ax.com...

> My "pickle" is that I changed it to rdisk(1) in both lines (stupid!); powered
> down; hooked the 120GB back and rebooted.
> Now I get a message -
> "Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt:
> <windows root>\system32\hal.dll
> Please reinstall a copy of the file."
>
> Don't know how I can get back in to change the boot.ini as Win98se doesn't
> recognize the drive as it is NTFS. Should I just try to reinstall WinXP?
>
You should copy your boot files to a floppy formatted by XP, so that you can
easily edit boot.ini: ntldr, ntdetect, boot.ini.

I have rdisk(0) and (1) on mine, just because things change so often.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 9:25:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Thanks Eric,
I decided to re-install but thats the first thing I will do when it's up and
running.




On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 14:30:51 -0800, "Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote:

><JPW> wrote in message news:s53kr01gr3k38ulpbfk90dcuaudgpm4e7c@4ax.com...
>
>> My "pickle" is that I changed it to rdisk(1) in both lines (stupid!); powered
>> down; hooked the 120GB back and rebooted.
>> Now I get a message -
>> "Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt:
>> <windows root>\system32\hal.dll
>> Please reinstall a copy of the file."
>>
>> Don't know how I can get back in to change the boot.ini as Win98se doesn't
>> recognize the drive as it is NTFS. Should I just try to reinstall WinXP?
>>
>You should copy your boot files to a floppy formatted by XP, so that you can
>easily edit boot.ini: ntldr, ntdetect, boot.ini.
>
>I have rdisk(0) and (1) on mine, just because things change so often.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 9:42:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 14:47:04 -0800, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

><JPW> got pickled:
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>>JPW> wrote:
>>>> Have an ABIT BE6 mb.
>>>> Presently I have this IDE/ATA configuration -
>>>> IDE3 master(ATA) - 80GB with 2 partitions of 40GB.
>>>> First is Win98se and second just for data.(C: & F:) 
>>>> IDE3 slave (ATA) - 12GB just for data. (D:) 
>>>> IDE4 master(ATA) - 120GB just for data (E:) 
>>>> (All FAT32)
>>>>
>>>> IDE1 & 2 - Total of 3 cd/dvd burners/drives. (W:, X:, Y:) 
>>>> Have the latest Highpoint controller s/w for this board
>>>> (V1.25)and Win98se.
>>>>
>>>> Recently made some changes, putting the 120GB as
>>>> IDE3 slave and the 12GB as IDE4 master. All OK.
>>>
>>>
>>> So now you have:
>>> Ultra DMA 33 IDE channels 1 & 2 - 3 ATAPI devices
>>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Master - Win98SE, data
>>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Slave - 120GB data
>>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 4, Master - 12GB data (->WinXP)
>>>
>>>
>>>> Wanted to install WinXP on the 12GB so, to be safe,
>>>> unplugged all the other hd's. Installed Win XP using
>>>> Highpoint drivers (F6) for Win2000 that I was told
>>>> would work OK.
>>>> Everything installed OK
>>>>
>>>> Start plugging in the hd's.
>>>> All is OK except if I plug in the 120 GB.
>>>> This is a Western Digital 7200 Eide.
>>>> With this drive plugged in and booting to Win98se all is OK.
>>>> However, booting to WinXP won't work.
>>>> Gets to the WinXP splash screen and locks up.
>>>> Unplug just this drive and WinXP boots fine and
>>>> see's the 80GB with the Win98se and data partitions.
>>>> Any ideas?
>>>
>>>
>>> Yeah. Boot.ini on the WinXP partition thinks that it's
>>> on the 2nd HD in the boot sequence. When the 120GB
>>> HD isn't there, WinXP *is* on the 2nd HD (i.e. rdisk(1) ),
>>> but when the 120GB HD is there, *it* is the the 2nd HD
>>> in the boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(1) ), and WinXP's boot
>>> manager sends control to the wrong HD. Just change
>>> the rdisk value boot.ini which refers to the WinXP HD
>>> to "rdisk(2)", i.e. the 3rd HD relative to the start of the
>>> HD boot sequence. Boot.ini can be found just below
>>> the root in WinXP's file structure. You can easily edit
>>> it with Notepad.
>>>
>>>*TimDaniels*
>>
>> Tim,
>> Got myself in a bit of a pickle here :-(.
>> I unplugged the 120GB so I could boot to WinXP.
>> Here's the contents of Boot.ini
>> -
>> boot loader]
>> timeout=30
>> default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
>> [operating systems]
>> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS=
>> "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
>>
>> Something I didn't mention but may be of importance -
>> I use the Highpoint ATA boot screen to change the boot
>> drive. After choosing the drive to boot from,
>> that drive becomes the C: drive and the other drive letters
>> change accordingly.
>> My BIOS is set to boot from C: first. So after making the
>> change the system reboots from whatever drive has
>> become C:..
>>
>> Is this why it says rdisk(0)?
>
>
> The OS sets the drive letter, so your BIOS boots the
> ntldr in the "active" partition of the HD at the head of
> its boot sequence. The Highpoint BIOS apparently
> passes its boot sequence on to the mb's BIOS which
> then uses that as its HD boot sequence. During your
> WinXP installation, the 1st partition on your 120GB HD
> was marked "active" and boot.ini, ntldr and ntdetect.com
> were put just under the root of its file system. And since
> it was the only HD in the PC at the time - and thus at the
> head of the boot sequence - rdisk() in the boot.ini file
> was set to rdisk(0) to indicate that the OS could be found
> at the 0th position in the boot sequence, and patition()
> was set to parition(1) to mean that the OS could be found
> in the 1st partition of that HD.
>
>
>> My "pickle" is that I changed it to rdisk(1) in both lines (stupid!);
>> powered down; hooked the 120GB back and rebooted.
>> Now I get a message -
>> "Windows could not start because the following file is
>> missing or corrupt: <windows root>\system32\hal.dll
>> Please reinstall a copy of the file."
>>
>> Don't know how I can get back in to change the boot.ini
>> as Win98se doesn't recognize the drive as it is NTFS.
>> Should I just try to reinstall WinXP?
>
>
> When you plugged in other drives ahead of it (in terms
> of S-ATA channel position) on the Highpoint controller
> card, you changed the boot sequence that it reported
> to the mb's BIOS. With the Win98SE HD at the head
> of the sequence, it was where it used to be, and it
> booted fine. When you had the 120GB with WinXP
> there (where it was 1st installed), the WinXP booted
> fine. This "fine" position is at rdisk(0)partition(1).
>
> Now the boot.ini file in the 120GB HD says it's at
> position rdisk(1)partition(1), but it's not there - it's at
> position rdisk(0)partition(1) when it's the only HD in
> the system. Try putting it in the boot sequence that
> Highpoint reports by plugging another HD into the
> Highpoint card and manually setting its BIOS's boot
> sequence so that the 120GB HD *is* at the 1th position
> (i.e. at the 2nd relative position in the boot sequence).
> That should get your WinXP booted.
>
> Then reset the rdisk() values to rdisk(0) in both the
> "default=" line and the "[operating systems]" line, and
> put your 120GB drive at the head of the boot sequence -
> either manually by adjusting the Highpoint BIOS, or by
> physical channel position.
>
> Dual booting:
>
> If you want to maintain 2 OSes and dual boot to either
> of them at startup, add another line to the boot.ini file
> in the 120GB HD that says:
>
>multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS=
> "Windows 98SE" /fastdetect
>
> This says that the Win98SE system is on the 2nd HD
> in the 1st partition. Change the default line back to
> rdisk(0) like so:
>
>default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
>
> Then change the timeout value to 20 seconds since
> NOBODY needs 30 seconds to decide which OS to
> boot. :-)
>
> Then put in the other HDs at subsequent positions.
> That will send control to your WinXP boot manager at
> startup, and WinXP's boot manager will give you the
> option of booting to your WinXP system (its default
> system), or to your Win98SE system on the 2nd HD.
>
> You can rearrange the non-WinXP drives if you want,
> but just maintain the WinXP HD at the head of the boot
> sequence, and keep the boot.ini file in the WinXP HD
> pointing to the correct position in the boot sequence
> for the Win98SE HD.
>
>*TimDaniels*

Wow Tim, thats a lot to take in for a newbie like me :-) I really appreciate you
taking time to explain this. I'll have to sit down and read up on all this.
Meanwhile, what I decided to do, prior to getting your reply, was to do a
re-install.
Just unplugged the 120GB for now and re-installed to the 12GB.
But I thought I'd try something different next.
Instead of putting the 120GB on the ATA I put it as a slave on the remaining
channel of IDE1 just for the heck of it. I also made sure that the BIOS boot
sequence was EXT, A, C where EXT is the ATA.
Rebooted.
WinXP boots!
Problem is it shows the drive as F: in Explorer but says "it is unformatted".
Re-booting back to Win98se and that see's and reads the drive fine as before.
Odd.

Jeff
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 10, 2004 10:45:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<JPW> wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>><JPW> got pickled:
>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>>>JPW> wrote:
>>>>> Have an ABIT BE6 mb.
>>>>> Presently I have this IDE/ATA configuration -
>>>>> IDE3 master(ATA) - 80GB with 2 partitions of 40GB.
>>>>> First is Win98se and second just for data.(C: & F:) 
>>>>> IDE3 slave (ATA) - 12GB just for data. (D:) 
>>>>> IDE4 master(ATA) - 120GB just for data (E:) 
>>>>> (All FAT32)
>>>>>
>>>>> IDE1 & 2 - Total of 3 cd/dvd burners/drives. (W:, X:, Y:) 
>>>>> Have the latest Highpoint controller s/w for this board
>>>>> (V1.25)and Win98se.
>>>>>
>>>>> Recently made some changes, putting the 120GB as
>>>>> IDE3 slave and the 12GB as IDE4 master. All OK.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> So now you have:
>>>> Ultra DMA 33 IDE channels 1 & 2 - 3 ATAPI devices
>>>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Master - Win98SE, data
>>>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Slave - 120GB data
>>>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 4, Master - 12GB data (->WinXP)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Wanted to install WinXP on the 12GB so, to be safe,
>>>>> unplugged all the other hd's. Installed Win XP using
>>>>> Highpoint drivers (F6) for Win2000 that I was told
>>>>> would work OK.
>>>>> Everything installed OK
>>>>>
>>>>> Start plugging in the hd's.
>>>>> All is OK except if I plug in the 120 GB.
>>>>> This is a Western Digital 7200 Eide.
>>>>> With this drive plugged in and booting to Win98se all is OK.
>>>>> However, booting to WinXP won't work.
>>>>> Gets to the WinXP splash screen and locks up.
>>>>> Unplug just this drive and WinXP boots fine and
>>>>> see's the 80GB with the Win98se and data partitions.
>>>>> Any ideas?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Yeah. Boot.ini on the WinXP partition thinks that it's
>>>> on the 2nd HD in the boot sequence. When the 120GB
>>>> HD isn't there, WinXP *is* on the 2nd HD (i.e. rdisk(1) ),
>>>> but when the 120GB HD is there, *it* is the the 2nd HD
>>>> in the boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(1) ), and WinXP's boot
>>>> manager sends control to the wrong HD. Just change
>>>> the rdisk value boot.ini which refers to the WinXP HD
>>>> to "rdisk(2)", i.e. the 3rd HD relative to the start of the
>>>> HD boot sequence. Boot.ini can be found just below
>>>> the root in WinXP's file structure. You can easily edit
>>>> it with Notepad.
>>>>
>>>>*TimDaniels*
>>>
>>> Tim,
>>> Got myself in a bit of a pickle here :-(.
>>> I unplugged the 120GB so I could boot to WinXP.
>>> Here's the contents of Boot.ini
>>> -
>>> boot loader]
>>> timeout=30
>>> default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
>>> [operating systems]
>>> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS=
>>> "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
>>>
>>> Something I didn't mention but may be of importance -
>>> I use the Highpoint ATA boot screen to change the boot
>>> drive. After choosing the drive to boot from,
>>> that drive becomes the C: drive and the other drive letters
>>> change accordingly.
>>> My BIOS is set to boot from C: first. So after making the
>>> change the system reboots from whatever drive has
>>> become C:..
>>>
>>> Is this why it says rdisk(0)?
>>
>>
>> The OS sets the drive letter, so your BIOS boots the
>> ntldr in the "active" partition of the HD at the head of
>> its boot sequence. The Highpoint BIOS apparently
>> passes its boot sequence on to the mb's BIOS which
>> then uses that as its HD boot sequence. During your
>> WinXP installation, the 1st partition on your 120GB HD
>> was marked "active" and boot.ini, ntldr and ntdetect.com
>> were put just under the root of its file system. And since
>> it was the only HD in the PC at the time - and thus at the
>> head of the boot sequence - rdisk() in the boot.ini file
>> was set to rdisk(0) to indicate that the OS could be found
>> at the 0th position in the boot sequence, and patition()
>> was set to parition(1) to mean that the OS could be found
>> in the 1st partition of that HD.
>>
>>
>>> My "pickle" is that I changed it to rdisk(1) in both lines (stupid!);
>>> powered down; hooked the 120GB back and rebooted.
>>> Now I get a message -
>>> "Windows could not start because the following file is
>>> missing or corrupt: <windows root>\system32\hal.dll
>>> Please reinstall a copy of the file."
>>>
>>> Don't know how I can get back in to change the boot.ini
>>> as Win98se doesn't recognize the drive as it is NTFS.
>>> Should I just try to reinstall WinXP?
>>
>>
>> When you plugged in other drives ahead of it (in terms
>> of S-ATA channel position) on the Highpoint controller
>> card, you changed the boot sequence that it reported
>> to the mb's BIOS. With the Win98SE HD at the head
>> of the sequence, it was where it used to be, and it
>> booted fine. When you had the 120GB with WinXP
>> there (where it was 1st installed), the WinXP booted
>> fine. This "fine" position is at rdisk(0)partition(1).
>>
>> Now the boot.ini file in the 120GB HD says it's at
>> position rdisk(1)partition(1), but it's not there - it's at
>> position rdisk(0)partition(1) when it's the only HD in
>> the system. Try putting it in the boot sequence that
>> Highpoint reports by plugging another HD into the
>> Highpoint card and manually setting its BIOS's boot
>> sequence so that the 120GB HD *is* at the 1th position
>> (i.e. at the 2nd relative position in the boot sequence).
>> That should get your WinXP booted.
>>
>> Then reset the rdisk() values to rdisk(0) in both the
>> "default=" line and the "[operating systems]" line, and
>> put your 120GB drive at the head of the boot sequence -
>> either manually by adjusting the Highpoint BIOS, or by
>> physical channel position.
>>
>> Dual booting:
>>
>> If you want to maintain 2 OSes and dual boot to either
>> of them at startup, add another line to the boot.ini file
>> in the 120GB HD that says:
>>
>>multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS=
>> "Windows 98SE" /fastdetect
>>
>> This says that the Win98SE system is on the 2nd HD
>> in the 1st partition. Change the default line back to
>> rdisk(0) like so:
>>
>>default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
>>
>> Then change the timeout value to 20 seconds since
>> NOBODY needs 30 seconds to decide which OS to
>> boot. :-)
>>
>> Then put in the other HDs at subsequent positions.
>> That will send control to your WinXP boot manager at
>> startup, and WinXP's boot manager will give you the
>> option of booting to your WinXP system (its default
>> system), or to your Win98SE system on the 2nd HD.
>>
>> You can rearrange the non-WinXP drives if you want,
>> but just maintain the WinXP HD at the head of the boot
>> sequence, and keep the boot.ini file in the WinXP HD
>> pointing to the correct position in the boot sequence
>> for the Win98SE HD.
>>
>>*TimDaniels*
>
> Wow Tim, thats a lot to take in for a newbie like me :-) I really appreciate you
> taking time to explain this. I'll have to sit down and read up on all this.
> Meanwhile, what I decided to do, prior to getting your reply, was to do a
> re-install.
> Just unplugged the 120GB for now and re-installed to the 12GB.
> But I thought I'd try something different next.
> Instead of putting the 120GB on the ATA I put it as a slave on the remaining
> channel of IDE1 just for the heck of it. I also made sure that the BIOS boot
> sequence was EXT, A, C where EXT is the ATA.
> Rebooted.
> WinXP boots!
> Problem is it shows the drive as F: in Explorer but says "it is unformatted".
> Re-booting back to Win98se and that see's and reads the drive fine as before.
> Odd.


The key to understanding this is what you mean by "A" and "C".
If these are drives, remember that drive letters are assigned by
the running OS, and the running OS always calls itself "C:", and
it will name the other drives (for its own operations) according to
an algorithm that takes it through the alphabet. So what are "A"
and "C"?
By "ATA" I assume you mean the Highpoint IDE controller card.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 11, 2004 1:07:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 19:45:11 -0800, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

><JPW> wrote:
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>
>>><JPW> got pickled:
>>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>>>>JPW> wrote:
>>>>>> Have an ABIT BE6 mb.
>>>>>> Presently I have this IDE/ATA configuration -
>>>>>> IDE3 master(ATA) - 80GB with 2 partitions of 40GB.
>>>>>> First is Win98se and second just for data.(C: & F:) 
>>>>>> IDE3 slave (ATA) - 12GB just for data. (D:) 
>>>>>> IDE4 master(ATA) - 120GB just for data (E:) 
>>>>>> (All FAT32)
>>>>>>
>>>>>> IDE1 & 2 - Total of 3 cd/dvd burners/drives. (W:, X:, Y:) 
>>>>>> Have the latest Highpoint controller s/w for this board
>>>>>> (V1.25)and Win98se.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Recently made some changes, putting the 120GB as
>>>>>> IDE3 slave and the 12GB as IDE4 master. All OK.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> So now you have:
>>>>> Ultra DMA 33 IDE channels 1 & 2 - 3 ATAPI devices
>>>>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Master - Win98SE, data
>>>>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 3, Slave - 120GB data
>>>>> Ultra DMA 33/66 IDE channel 4, Master - 12GB data (->WinXP)
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> Wanted to install WinXP on the 12GB so, to be safe,
>>>>>> unplugged all the other hd's. Installed Win XP using
>>>>>> Highpoint drivers (F6) for Win2000 that I was told
>>>>>> would work OK.
>>>>>> Everything installed OK
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Start plugging in the hd's.
>>>>>> All is OK except if I plug in the 120 GB.
>>>>>> This is a Western Digital 7200 Eide.
>>>>>> With this drive plugged in and booting to Win98se all is OK.
>>>>>> However, booting to WinXP won't work.
>>>>>> Gets to the WinXP splash screen and locks up.
>>>>>> Unplug just this drive and WinXP boots fine and
>>>>>> see's the 80GB with the Win98se and data partitions.
>>>>>> Any ideas?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Yeah. Boot.ini on the WinXP partition thinks that it's
>>>>> on the 2nd HD in the boot sequence. When the 120GB
>>>>> HD isn't there, WinXP *is* on the 2nd HD (i.e. rdisk(1) ),
>>>>> but when the 120GB HD is there, *it* is the the 2nd HD
>>>>> in the boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(1) ), and WinXP's boot
>>>>> manager sends control to the wrong HD. Just change
>>>>> the rdisk value boot.ini which refers to the WinXP HD
>>>>> to "rdisk(2)", i.e. the 3rd HD relative to the start of the
>>>>> HD boot sequence. Boot.ini can be found just below
>>>>> the root in WinXP's file structure. You can easily edit
>>>>> it with Notepad.
>>>>>
>>>>>*TimDaniels*
>>>>
>>>> Tim,
>>>> Got myself in a bit of a pickle here :-(.
>>>> I unplugged the 120GB so I could boot to WinXP.
>>>> Here's the contents of Boot.ini
>>>> -
>>>> boot loader]
>>>> timeout=30
>>>> default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
>>>> [operating systems]
>>>> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS=
>>>> "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
>>>>
>>>> Something I didn't mention but may be of importance -
>>>> I use the Highpoint ATA boot screen to change the boot
>>>> drive. After choosing the drive to boot from,
>>>> that drive becomes the C: drive and the other drive letters
>>>> change accordingly.
>>>> My BIOS is set to boot from C: first. So after making the
>>>> change the system reboots from whatever drive has
>>>> become C:..
>>>>
>>>> Is this why it says rdisk(0)?
>>>
>>>
>>> The OS sets the drive letter, so your BIOS boots the
>>> ntldr in the "active" partition of the HD at the head of
>>> its boot sequence. The Highpoint BIOS apparently
>>> passes its boot sequence on to the mb's BIOS which
>>> then uses that as its HD boot sequence. During your
>>> WinXP installation, the 1st partition on your 120GB HD
>>> was marked "active" and boot.ini, ntldr and ntdetect.com
>>> were put just under the root of its file system. And since
>>> it was the only HD in the PC at the time - and thus at the
>>> head of the boot sequence - rdisk() in the boot.ini file
>>> was set to rdisk(0) to indicate that the OS could be found
>>> at the 0th position in the boot sequence, and patition()
>>> was set to parition(1) to mean that the OS could be found
>>> in the 1st partition of that HD.
>>>
>>>
>>>> My "pickle" is that I changed it to rdisk(1) in both lines (stupid!);
>>>> powered down; hooked the 120GB back and rebooted.
>>>> Now I get a message -
>>>> "Windows could not start because the following file is
>>>> missing or corrupt: <windows root>\system32\hal.dll
>>>> Please reinstall a copy of the file."
>>>>
>>>> Don't know how I can get back in to change the boot.ini
>>>> as Win98se doesn't recognize the drive as it is NTFS.
>>>> Should I just try to reinstall WinXP?
>>>
>>>
>>> When you plugged in other drives ahead of it (in terms
>>> of S-ATA channel position) on the Highpoint controller
>>> card, you changed the boot sequence that it reported
>>> to the mb's BIOS. With the Win98SE HD at the head
>>> of the sequence, it was where it used to be, and it
>>> booted fine. When you had the 120GB with WinXP
>>> there (where it was 1st installed), the WinXP booted
>>> fine. This "fine" position is at rdisk(0)partition(1).
>>>
>>> Now the boot.ini file in the 120GB HD says it's at
>>> position rdisk(1)partition(1), but it's not there - it's at
>>> position rdisk(0)partition(1) when it's the only HD in
>>> the system. Try putting it in the boot sequence that
>>> Highpoint reports by plugging another HD into the
>>> Highpoint card and manually setting its BIOS's boot
>>> sequence so that the 120GB HD *is* at the 1th position
>>> (i.e. at the 2nd relative position in the boot sequence).
>>> That should get your WinXP booted.
>>>
>>> Then reset the rdisk() values to rdisk(0) in both the
>>> "default=" line and the "[operating systems]" line, and
>>> put your 120GB drive at the head of the boot sequence -
>>> either manually by adjusting the Highpoint BIOS, or by
>>> physical channel position.
>>>
>>> Dual booting:
>>>
>>> If you want to maintain 2 OSes and dual boot to either
>>> of them at startup, add another line to the boot.ini file
>>> in the 120GB HD that says:
>>>
>>>multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS=
>>> "Windows 98SE" /fastdetect
>>>
>>> This says that the Win98SE system is on the 2nd HD
>>> in the 1st partition. Change the default line back to
>>> rdisk(0) like so:
>>>
>>>default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
>>>
>>> Then change the timeout value to 20 seconds since
>>> NOBODY needs 30 seconds to decide which OS to
>>> boot. :-)
>>>
>>> Then put in the other HDs at subsequent positions.
>>> That will send control to your WinXP boot manager at
>>> startup, and WinXP's boot manager will give you the
>>> option of booting to your WinXP system (its default
>>> system), or to your Win98SE system on the 2nd HD.
>>>
>>> You can rearrange the non-WinXP drives if you want,
>>> but just maintain the WinXP HD at the head of the boot
>>> sequence, and keep the boot.ini file in the WinXP HD
>>> pointing to the correct position in the boot sequence
>>> for the Win98SE HD.
>>>
>>>*TimDaniels*
>>
>> Wow Tim, thats a lot to take in for a newbie like me :-) I really appreciate you
>> taking time to explain this. I'll have to sit down and read up on all this.
>> Meanwhile, what I decided to do, prior to getting your reply, was to do a
>> re-install.
>> Just unplugged the 120GB for now and re-installed to the 12GB.
>> But I thought I'd try something different next.
>> Instead of putting the 120GB on the ATA I put it as a slave on the remaining
>> channel of IDE1 just for the heck of it. I also made sure that the BIOS boot
>> sequence was EXT, A, C where EXT is the ATA.
>> Rebooted.
>> WinXP boots!
>> Problem is it shows the drive as F: in Explorer but says "it is unformatted".
>> Re-booting back to Win98se and that see's and reads the drive fine as before.
>> Odd.
>
>
> The key to understanding this is what you mean by "A" and "C".
> If these are drives, remember that drive letters are assigned by
> the running OS, and the running OS always calls itself "C:", and
> it will name the other drives (for its own operations) according to
> an algorithm that takes it through the alphabet. So what are "A"
> and "C"?
> By "ATA" I assume you mean the Highpoint IDE controller card.
>
>*TimDaniels*

Sorry for the confusion,
In the Award BIOS I can set various combinations of a group of three boot
priorities. Either a hard-drive letter (C in this case); floppy (A); CDROM or
EXT where EXT can be assigned and is set to UDMA (The Highpoint IDE
controller).
In this case I've got it set to EXT, A, C so it will first look for bootable os
on the Highpoint controller, then the floppy (A) and then the "C" drive.
Normally all the hd's are on the Highpoint controller and so the drive letter
assignment was as you see in the first part of the post. In the Highpoint boot
menu, whatever drive is set to the bootable drive is assigned the letter C: when
you reboot and the other drive letters are changed accordingly.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but because the 120GB is now on IDE1(slave), this would
have been seen as C: by the os, and would superceed whatever drive assignment
the Highpoint controller set(?) Therefore I had to set the BIOS to EXT, A, C so
it would still boot from the Highpoint controller first.
Is this what you needed to know?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 12, 2004 3:36:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message news:sJGdnXeg0rnY8CfcRVn-3g@comcast.com
> <JPW> wrote:
> > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
[very big snip]
> > Wow Tim, thats a lot to take in for a newbie like me :-) I really appreciate
> > you taking time to explain this. I'll have to sit down and read up on all this.
> > Meanwhile, what I decided to do, prior to getting your reply, was to do
> > a re-install.
> > Just unplugged the 120GB for now and re-installed to the 12GB.
> > But I thought I'd try something different next.
> > Instead of putting the 120GB on the ATA I put it as a slave on the remaining
> > channel of IDE1 just for the heck of it. I also made sure that the BIOS boot
> > sequence was EXT, A, C where EXT is the ATA.
> > Rebooted.
> > WinXP boots!
> > Problem is it shows the drive as F: in Explorer but says "it is unformatted".
> > Re-booting back to Win98se and that see's and reads the drive fine as before.
> > Odd.
>
>
> The key to understanding this is what you mean by "A" and "C".
> If these are drives, remember that drive letters are assigned by
> the running OS, and the running OS always calls itself "C:",

And how is the bios to know about what OS will be running? Not.

> and it will name the other drives (for its own operations) according to
> to an algorithm that takes it through the alphabet.

> So what are "A" and "C"?

A and C is what they always have been: the first removable diskdrive de-
vice and the first fixed disk drive device aka the floppy and the first HD.
They are name substitutes for device nr 00h and device nr 80h.

> By "ATA" I assume you mean the Highpoint IDE controller card.
>
> *TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 12, 2004 3:37:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<JPW> wrote in message news:n01mr01qcb1qg3lg9qs87sq7qoqa0kd52p@4ax.com
> On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 19:45:11 -0800, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:
> > <JPW> wrote:
> > > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
> > > > <JPW> got pickled:
> > > > > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
[huge snip]
> > The key to understanding this is what you mean by "A" and "C".
> > If these are drives, remember that drive letters are assigned by
> > the running OS, and the running OS always calls itself "C:", and
> > it will name the other drives (for its own operations) according to
> > an algorithm that takes it through the alphabet. So what are "A"
> > and "C"?
> > By "ATA" I assume you mean the Highpoint IDE controller card.
> >
> > *TimDaniels*
>
> Sorry for the confusion,
> In the Award BIOS I can set various combinations of a group of three boot
> priorities. Either a hard-drive letter (C in this case); floppy (A); CDROM or
> EXT where EXT can be assigned and is set to UDMA (The Highpoint IDE
> controller).
> In this case I've got it set to EXT, A, C so it will first look for bootable os
> on the Highpoint controller, then the floppy (A) and then the "C" drive.
> Normally all the hd's are on the Highpoint controller and so the drive letter
> assignment was as you see in the first part of the post. In the Highpoint boot
> menu, whatever drive is set to the bootable drive is assigned the letter C: when
> you reboot and the other drive letters are changed accordingly.

> Correct me if I'm wrong, but because the 120GB is now on IDE1(slave), this would
> have been seen as C: by the os,

By the bios.

> and would superceed whatever drive assignment the Highpoint controller set(?)

Depends on what it changes, the whole bootorder or just within it's own device
number range. Probably the latter.

> Therefore I had to set the BIOS to EXT, A, C so
> it would still boot from the Highpoint controller first.

Right.

> Is this what you needed to know?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 12, 2004 9:15:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Folkert Rienstra" wrote:
Timothy Daniels wrote:
>> drive letters are assigned by
>> the running OS, and the running OS always calls itself "C:",
>
> And how is the bios to know about what OS will be running? Not.


The BIOS doesn't know. All it knows is which HD is at the
head of its boot priority list (the "boot sequence"). The OS
that is ultimately loaded assigns the drive letters. The OS
which is ultimately loaded may be from any partition on any
HD in the system, as specified as options by entries in the
boot.ini file, and this is totally unknown to the BIOS.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 12, 2004 9:31:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Folkert Rienstra" wrote:
> <JPW> wrote:
>> Correct me if I'm wrong, but because the 120GB
>> is now on IDE1(slave), this would
>> have been seen as C: by the os,
>
> By the bios.


The BIOS has no idea from which partition on which
HD the OS will come, so it cannot know which "Local Disk"
(i.e. partition) will be named "C:". All the BIOS knows is
to which HD it will pass control, but the OS need not come
from that HD.

Only in the "vanilla" case - where the HD at the head of
the BIOS's boot sequence contains in its one and only
partition the only OS listed in its boot.ini file - will the HD and
the "C:" drive correspond one-to-one. Otherwise, there
may be many OSes in many partitions on many HDs, and
any one of them can be loaded, and the one that is loaded
will call itself "C:".

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 12, 2004 10:16:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<JPW> wrote:
> In the Award BIOS I can set various combinations
> of a group of three boot priorities. Either a hard-drive
> letter (C in this case); floppy (A); CDROM or EXT
> where EXT can be assigned and is set to UDMA
> (The Highpoint IDE controller).
> In this case I've got it set to EXT, A, C so it will first
> look for bootable os on the Highpoint controller,
> then the floppy (A) and then the "C" drive.


What if you connect two or three or four HDs to the
Highpoint controller? How do you then designate
the boot sequence?


> Normally all the hd's are on the Highpoint controller
> and so the drive letter assignment was as you see
> in the first part of the post.


What if the 1st HD in the sequence has in its
"active" partition (which may be its 2nd partition)
a boot.ini file that designates the 3rd partition
on the 4th HD to be the origin of the loaded OS?
What are each of the 4 HDs called in the Highpoint
boot sequence? What are they called in motherboard's
boot sequence?

In my current system, I have 3 HDs, all on a SIIG
controller card. There is an OS on the 1st HD, an OS
on the 2nd HD, and 4 OSes on the 3rd HD, and I
can boot any one of them. All that the motherboard's
BIOS knows is the model no. of each of the HDs,
and it uses those to name each of the 4 HDs in its
boot sequence. But the loaded OS knows each
partition as a "Local Disk", and it gives each of them
a letter, and the letter is different depending on which
OS gets loaded and which HDs are visible when it
starts up. So you see, calling any HD at the BIOS
level is very misleading. To get a graphic of what I'm
explaining, look at the Disk Management dialog box
via (rt-clk)MyComputer/Manage/DiskManagement.
You'll see that Disk 0 contains your OS, and it probably
has a single partition named "Local Disk (C:) ". But
there can be multiple HDs, each containing multiple
"Local Disks", each one containing an OS. And these
"Local Disks" get renamed depending on which OS
gets loaded and started.

When you put one HD in the system, it will always be
at relative position 0 in the *HD* boot sequence, so
the BIOS will pass control to it. The boot.ini file in
the "active" parition on that HD then better refer to
the OS as being on the HD at position rdisk(0).

If you put in another HD, it can take the 2nd relative
position in the HD boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(1) ), or the
1st relative position (i.e. rdisk(0) ). So, by interchanging
the 2 HDs on the Highpoint card, you can control which
HD the BIOS passes control to, or you can do it by
explicitly inputing the boot sequence to the BIOS yourself.
By making the real position agree with what the boot.ini file
assumes, you can make the OS on the 120GB HD boot up
or not. If you don't follow any of this, you've already solved
your problem, so don't do anything.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 13, 2004 12:32:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:

> Otherwise, there
> may be many OSes in many partitions on many HDs, and
> any one of them can be loaded, and the one that is loaded
> will call itself "C:".

No, the loaded OS does not call it's systemroot C: in all cases. It
can be any letter.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 13, 2004 1:19:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"chrisv" replied:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>> Otherwise, there
>> may be many OSes in many partitions on many HDs, and
>> any one of them can be loaded, and the one that is loaded
>> will call itself "C:".
>
> No, the loaded OS does not call it's systemroot C: in all cases.
> It can be any letter.


In what cases would the running OS call its root other than C:?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 13, 2004 5:30:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
news:KfWdnVflD4u0QCDcRVn-tA@comcast.com...
> "chrisv" replied:
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>
>>> Otherwise, there
>>> may be many OSes in many partitions on many HDs, and
>>> any one of them can be loaded, and the one that is loaded
>>> will call itself "C:".
>>
>> No, the loaded OS does not call it's systemroot C: in all cases.
>> It can be any letter.
>
>
> In what cases would the running OS call its root other than C:?
>
> *TimDaniels*

Windows XP will. Depends on the partition you put it in and a number of
other variables. I've had D: and E: Windows XP installation.

Drives poorly written applications nuts!

Tom
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 13, 2004 5:30:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Tom Scales" wrote:
>
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>> "chrisv" replied:
>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>
>>>> Otherwise, there
>>>> may be many OSes in many partitions on many HDs, and
>>>> any one of them can be loaded, and the one that is loaded
>>>> will call itself "C:".
>>>
>>> No, the loaded OS does not call it's systemroot C: in all cases.
>>> It can be any letter.
>>
>>
>> In what cases would the running OS call its root other than C:?
>
> Windows XP will. Depends on the partition you put it in and a number of
> other variables. I've had D: and E: Windows XP installation.
>
> Drives poorly written applications nuts!


In what situations would WinXP call its root other than C:?
(Notice that I'm asking about the situation or case, not the name
of the OS which might to it.)

I have WinXP Pro on 6 partitions on 3 hard drives, and no matter
which one I load, it calls ist own root "C:", and it names the other
partitions other letters out to "I:". Never have I seen the RUNNING
OS call itself other than "C:".

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 13, 2004 5:30:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Tom Scales" wrote:
> [..........] I've had D: and E: Windows XP installation.


Although they had roots named D: and E:, did
each of those OS installations call their roots
D: or E: when they were loaded and RUNNING?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 13, 2004 6:53:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
news:sY6dncnV2t6_ayDcRVn-gg@comcast.com...
>
> "Tom Scales" wrote:
>>
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>> "chrisv" replied:
>>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Otherwise, there
>>>>> may be many OSes in many partitions on many HDs, and
>>>>> any one of them can be loaded, and the one that is loaded
>>>>> will call itself "C:".
>>>>
>>>> No, the loaded OS does not call it's systemroot C: in all cases.
>>>> It can be any letter.
>>>
>>>
>>> In what cases would the running OS call its root other than C:?
>>
>> Windows XP will. Depends on the partition you put it in and a number of
>> other variables. I've had D: and E: Windows XP installation.
>>
>> Drives poorly written applications nuts!
>
>
> In what situations would WinXP call its root other than C:?
> (Notice that I'm asking about the situation or case, not the name
> of the OS which might to it.)
>
> I have WinXP Pro on 6 partitions on 3 hard drives, and no matter
> which one I load, it calls ist own root "C:", and it names the other
> partitions other letters out to "I:". Never have I seen the RUNNING
> OS call itself other than "C:".
>
> *TimDaniels*
>
>
Honestly, I don't remember, as it has been awhile since it happened. I do
remember I was pissed and reformatted and reinstalled.

Tom
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 13, 2004 8:52:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
news:lsidnZZ_CIJynSPcRVn-rw@comcast.com...
> "Tom Scales" wrote:
>> [..........] I've had D: and E: Windows XP installation.
>
>
> Although they had roots named D: and E:, did
> each of those OS installations call their roots
> D: or E: when they were loaded and RUNNING?
>
> *TimDaniels*

Yep. That's what drove the applications crazy!
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 14, 2004 10:30:18 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:

>"Tom Scales" wrote:
>> [..........] I've had D: and E: Windows XP installation.
>
>
> Although they had roots named D: and E:, did
> each of those OS installations call their roots
> D: or E: when they were loaded and RUNNING?

Absolutely. On the Win2k machine I'm using right now, my
%systemdrive% is E:, and my %systemroot% is, E:\WINNT.

Every time I've done multiple Windows partitions on a machine, the
result (different letters being used) has been the same. If there's a
way around this, I don't know what it is (nor do I care).
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 14, 2004 10:33:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote:

>"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
>news:lsidnZZ_CIJynSPcRVn-rw@comcast.com...
>> "Tom Scales" wrote:
>>> [..........] I've had D: and E: Windows XP installation.
>>
>>
>> Although they had roots named D: and E:, did
>> each of those OS installations call their roots
>> D: or E: when they were loaded and RUNNING?
>>
>> *TimDaniels*
>
>Yep. That's what drove the applications crazy!

Poorly-written applications. It's simply bad programming style to
assume that the systemdrive is C:. They should be using system
variables like %systemdrive% and %programfiles%, which will always be
correct.

Type "set" in a command-prompt window to see all your system
variables.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 14, 2004 12:25:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

chrisv <chrisv@nospam.invalid> wrote:

>Every time I've done multiple Windows partitions on a machine, the
>result (different letters being used) has been the same.

Change that to "multiple bootable Windows partitions".
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 14, 2004 4:02:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"chrisv" wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:
>
>>"Tom Scales" wrote:
>>> [..........] I've had D: and E: Windows XP installation.
>>
>>
>> Although they had roots named D: and E:, did
>> each of those OS installations call their roots
>> D: or E: when they were loaded and RUNNING?
>
> Absolutely. On the Win2k machine I'm using right now, my
> %systemdrive% is E:, and my %systemroot% is, E:\WINNT.


Good point: The system drive and the system root
are not the same. The system root, WINNT in your case,
is specified in the boot.ini file, usually as WINNT or
WINDOWS. The system drive is also specified in
the boot.ini file as the value of rdisk() and it must be
a primary partition to have a bootable OS. The partition
in which ntldr resides and in which ntldr finds the
boot.ini file, is the "active" partition (specified by the
partition table) on the hard drive at the head of the
BIOS's boot sequence.

Regarding E:, did you ever explicitly name the drive "E:",
perhaps via Disk Management, or did that just get
assigned on its own?


> Every time I've done multiple Windows partitions on a
> machine, the result (different letters being used) has
> been the same.


Intersting. Whenever I clone my OS (WinXP Pro), the
resulting OS *always* calls its partition "Local Drive(C:) "
and the root of its file system is *always* C: . And
among the 6 WinXP Pro OSes in my PC, each one
*always* calls its file root "C:" when it boots up. And,
of course, the booted OS names the other paritions
accoding to some alphabetic algorithm.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 15, 2004 11:16:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:

>"chrisv" wrote:
>>
>> Absolutely. On the Win2k machine I'm using right now, my
>> %systemdrive% is E:, and my %systemroot% is, E:\WINNT.
>
>
> Good point: The system drive and the system root
> are not the same. The system root, WINNT in your case,
> is specified in the boot.ini file, usually as WINNT or
> WINDOWS. The system drive is also specified in
> the boot.ini file as the value of rdisk() and it must be
> a primary partition to have a bootable OS. The partition
> in which ntldr resides and in which ntldr finds the
> boot.ini file, is the "active" partition (specified by the
> partition table) on the hard drive at the head of the
> BIOS's boot sequence.
>
> Regarding E:, did you ever explicitly name the drive "E:",
> perhaps via Disk Management, or did that just get
> assigned on its own?

I just let them get assigned as Windows wants to...

>> Every time I've done multiple Windows partitions on a
>> machine, the result (different letters being used) has
>> been the same.
>
> Intersting. Whenever I clone my OS (WinXP Pro), the
> resulting OS *always* calls its partition "Local Drive(C:) "
> and the root of its file system is *always* C: . And
> among the 6 WinXP Pro OSes in my PC, each one
> *always* calls its file root "C:" when it boots up. And,
> of course, the booted OS names the other paritions
> accoding to some alphabetic algorithm.

Hmm...
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 15, 2004 12:19:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 19:16:03 -0800, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

><JPW> wrote:
>> In the Award BIOS I can set various combinations
>> of a group of three boot priorities. Either a hard-drive
>> letter (C in this case); floppy (A); CDROM or EXT
>> where EXT can be assigned and is set to UDMA
>> (The Highpoint IDE controller).
>> In this case I've got it set to EXT, A, C so it will first
>> look for bootable os on the Highpoint controller,
>> then the floppy (A) and then the "C" drive.
>
>
> What if you connect two or three or four HDs to the
> Highpoint controller? How do you then designate
> the boot sequence?
>
>
>> Normally all the hd's are on the Highpoint controller
>> and so the drive letter assignment was as you see
>> in the first part of the post.
>
>
> What if the 1st HD in the sequence has in its
> "active" partition (which may be its 2nd partition)
> a boot.ini file that designates the 3rd partition
> on the 4th HD to be the origin of the loaded OS?
> What are each of the 4 HDs called in the Highpoint
> boot sequence? What are they called in motherboard's
> boot sequence?
>
> In my current system, I have 3 HDs, all on a SIIG
> controller card. There is an OS on the 1st HD, an OS
> on the 2nd HD, and 4 OSes on the 3rd HD, and I
> can boot any one of them. All that the motherboard's
> BIOS knows is the model no. of each of the HDs,
> and it uses those to name each of the 4 HDs in its
> boot sequence. But the loaded OS knows each
> partition as a "Local Disk", and it gives each of them
> a letter, and the letter is different depending on which
> OS gets loaded and which HDs are visible when it
> starts up. So you see, calling any HD at the BIOS
> level is very misleading. To get a graphic of what I'm
> explaining, look at the Disk Management dialog box
> via (rt-clk)MyComputer/Manage/DiskManagement.
> You'll see that Disk 0 contains your OS, and it probably
> has a single partition named "Local Disk (C:) ". But
> there can be multiple HDs, each containing multiple
> "Local Disks", each one containing an OS. And these
> "Local Disks" get renamed depending on which OS
> gets loaded and started.
>
> When you put one HD in the system, it will always be
> at relative position 0 in the *HD* boot sequence, so
> the BIOS will pass control to it. The boot.ini file in
> the "active" parition on that HD then better refer to
> the OS as being on the HD at position rdisk(0).
>
> If you put in another HD, it can take the 2nd relative
> position in the HD boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(1) ), or the
> 1st relative position (i.e. rdisk(0) ). So, by interchanging
> the 2 HDs on the Highpoint card, you can control which
> HD the BIOS passes control to, or you can do it by
> explicitly inputing the boot sequence to the BIOS yourself.
> By making the real position agree with what the boot.ini file
> assumes, you can make the OS on the 120GB HD boot up
> or not. If you don't follow any of this, you've already solved
> your problem, so don't do anything.
>
>*TimDaniels*

Well Tim, after all that, I think I finally figured out the problem.
Turns out that anytime both the new 120GB and 12GB are plugged in WinXP won't
boot.
For the heck of it, with all 3 drives plugged in, I used Partition Magic in the
Win98se (80GB) to copy the WinXP (12GB) to a bootable partition on the 120GB.
With any combination of IDE3 or 4/master or slave, a combination of Win98se
(80GB)/WinXP(12GB) or Win98se(80GB)/WinXP(12GB) WinXP boots fine.
But WinXP(12GB)/WinXP(120GB) and WinXP freezes no matter which drive I boot to.
So, no matter what combination I try, if the old WinXP(12GB) is there as well as
the new 120(GB) WinXP won't boot.
Maybe just hardware incompatability between the old 12GB (I mean "old") and the
new 120GB.
(note that I also tried all the different combo's prior to copying WinXP to the
120GB as in the original setup with the same results).

Jeff
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 15, 2004 1:08:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<JPW> wrote:
> Well Tim, after all that, I think I finally figured out the problem.
> Turns out that anytime both the new 120GB and 12GB are
> plugged in WinXP won't boot.
>
> [...] with all 3 drives plugged in, I used Partition Magic in the
> Win98se (80GB) to copy the WinXP (12GB) to a bootable
> partition on the 120GB.
>
> With any combination of IDE3 or 4/master or slave,
> a combination of
> Win98se (80GB)/WinXP(12GB) or
> Win98se(80GB)/WinXP(12GB)
> WinXP boots fine.


That's a tautology. Care to re-state that?


> But WinXP(12GB)/WinXP(120GB)
> and WinXP freezes no matter which drive I boot to.
>
> So, no matter what combination I try, if the
> old WinXP(12GB) is there as well as the new 120(GB)
> WinXP won't boot.
> Maybe just hardware incompatability between the
> old 12GB (I mean "old") and the new 120GB.
> (note that I also tried all the different combo's prior
> to copying WinXP to the 120GB as in the original
> setup with the same results).


This won't be cleared up until you state the contents
of the boot.ini file on each WinXP partition, and
which is the "active" partition on each of the two
WinXP-containing drives.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 15, 2004 6:40:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 10:08:14 -0800, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

><JPW> wrote:
>> Well Tim, after all that, I think I finally figured out the problem.
>> Turns out that anytime both the new 120GB and 12GB are
>> plugged in WinXP won't boot.
>>
>> [...] with all 3 drives plugged in, I used Partition Magic in the
>> Win98se (80GB) to copy the WinXP (12GB) to a bootable
>> partition on the 120GB.
>>
>> With any combination of IDE3 or 4/master or slave,
>> a combination of
>> Win98se (80GB)/WinXP(12GB) or
>> Win98se(80GB)/WinXP(12GB)
>> WinXP boots fine.
>
>
> That's a tautology. Care to re-state that?

>
>> But WinXP(12GB)/WinXP(120GB)
>> and WinXP freezes no matter which drive I boot to.
>>
>> So, no matter what combination I try, if the
>> old WinXP(12GB) is there as well as the new 120(GB)
>> WinXP won't boot.
>> Maybe just hardware incompatability between the
>> old 12GB (I mean "old") and the new 120GB.
>> (note that I also tried all the different combo's prior
>> to copying WinXP to the 120GB as in the original
>> setup with the same results).
>
>
> This won't be cleared up until you state the contents
> of the boot.ini file on each WinXP partition, and
> which is the "active" partition on each of the two
> WinXP-containing drives.
>
>*TimDaniels*

The boot.ini on both WinXP installs is -

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional"
/fastdetect

Partitions (as shown in Partition Magic) -

80GB - 40 GB Win98se (active/primary/ fat32), 40GB Data (none/logical/ fat32)
120GB - 20 GB WinXP (active/primary/NTFS), 100GB Data (none/logical/fat32)
12GB - 12 GB WinXP (active/primary/NTFS)

Not sure if this table will help (should have columns for master/IDE3/slave and
master/IDE4/slave where none indicates no drive) -

master - IDE3 - slave............master - IDE4 - slave
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Win98(80GB) none WinXP(12GB) none .....XP boots
WinXP(12BG) none Win98(80GB) none .....XP boots
[If WinXP(120GB) is added as slave to either IDE, XP hangs booting from either)

Win98(80GB) none WinXP(120GB) none .....XP boots
WinXP(120GB) none WIn98(80GB) none .....XP boots
[If WinXP(12GB) is added as slave to either IDE, XP hangs booting from either)

WinXP(120GB) none WinXP(12GB) none
[ In this case WinXP will hang when booting from either]

If either WinXP drive is set to master and is the only drive attached wether on
IDE3 or IDE4, WinXP will boot.

Jeff
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 15, 2004 6:40:10 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<JPW> wrote:
> The boot.ini on both WinXP installs is -
>
> [boot loader]
> timeout=30
> default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
> [operating systems]
> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS=
> "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect


That says that if this boot.ini file is accessed, there
is no multi-boot option - the only OS to load must
be the default (from timeout) or the one designated
by keyboard input (which is the same as the default),
and this is the OS whose system files start at the
WINDOWS folder in the root of the file structure in
the 1st partition of the hard drive at the head of the
BIOS's boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(0) ).

In short, WinXP's boot manager cannot start up
any OS but the one in the 1st partition on the highest
priority hard drive. You can't multi-boot with these
boot.ini files as they are. You have to add another
line that refers to the OS in the another hard drive,
perhaps rdisk(1).

As these boot.ini files are written now, the only
way you can multi-boot is by adjusting the BIOS's
boot sequence - either physically via (the BIOS menu
or juggling the position of the HD via jumpers or
cable position) - or by using a special boot manager
software.


> Partitions (as shown in Partition Magic) -
>
> 80GB - 40 GB Win98se (active/primary/ fat32),
> 40 GB Data (none/logical/ fat32)
>
> 120GB - 20 GB WinXP (active/primary/NTFS),
> 100 GB Data (none/logical/fat32)
>
> 12GB - 12 GB WinXP (active/primary/NTFS)
>
> [.......]
>
> master - IDE3 - slave master - IDE4 - slave
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Win98(80GB) none WinXP(12GB) none [XP boots]
> WinXP(12BG) none Win98(80GB) none [XP boots]
>
> [If WinXP(120GB) is added as slave to either IDE,
> XP hangs booting from either]
>
> Win98(80GB) none WinXP(120GB) none [XP boots]
> WinXP(120GB) none WIn98(80GB) none [XP boots]
>
> [If WinXP(12GB) is added as slave to either IDE,
> XP hangs booting from either]
>
> WinXP(120GB) none WinXP(12GB) none
> [ In this case WinXP will hang when booting from either]
>
> If either WinXP drive is set to master and is the only drive
> attached wether on IDE3 or IDE4, WinXP will boot.


I believe the key to all this is in the jumpering - what brand
HDs are they and how are you placing the jumpers to
determine Master/Slave or if you're using Cable Select,
what are the HDs' positions -
and in the boot sequence - which is strange if the BIOS
insists on naming the HDs even before the OS is loaded.

Care to explain your Master/Slave method and add
the boot sequence to the above table?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 16, 2004 2:57:24 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message news:i-KdndHcHNHylCDcRVn-pQ@comcast.com
> <JPW> wrote:
> > In the Award BIOS I can set various combinations
> > of a group of three boot priorities. Either a hard-drive
> > letter (C in this case); floppy (A); CDROM or EXT
> > where EXT can be assigned and is set to UDMA
> > (The Highpoint IDE controller).
> > In this case I've got it set to EXT, A, C so it will first
> > look for bootable os on the Highpoint controller,
> > then the floppy (A) and then the "C" drive.
>
>
> What if you connect two or three or four HDs to the
> Highpoint controller? How do you then designate
> the boot sequence?

Still the same, obviously. There is little other choice.

>
>
> > Normally all the hd's are on the Highpoint controller
> > and so the drive letter assignment was as you see
> > in the first part of the post.
>
>
> What if the 1st HD in the sequence

What sequence? There are two sequences, the MoBo one and the HighPoint one.

> has in its
> "active" partition (which may be its 2nd partition)
> a boot.ini file that designates the 3rd partition
> on the 4th HD to be the origin of the loaded OS?
> What are each of the 4 HDs called in the Highpoint
> boot sequence?

> What are they called in motherboard's boot sequence?

Does it matter?
His MoBo won't know about it, it will renumerate the whole HighPoint controller
in front of the floppy controller.

>
> In my current system, I have 3 HDs, all on a SIIG
> controller card. There is an OS on the 1st HD, an OS
> on the 2nd HD, and 4 OSes on the 3rd HD, and I
> can boot any one of them.

> All that the motherboard's BIOS knows is the model no. of
> each of the HDs,
> and it uses those to name each of the 4 HDs in its
> boot sequence.

So you have a smart bios, he doesn't.

> But the loaded OS knows each
> partition as a "Local Disk", and it gives each of them
> a letter, and the letter is different depending on which
> OS gets loaded and which HDs are visible when it
> starts up.

> So you see, calling any HD at the BIOS level is very misleading.

Goss, you must be young. It has been that for ages.
Try tell it to the bios makers.

> To get a graphic of what I'm
> explaining, look at the Disk Management dialog box
> via (rt-clk)MyComputer/Manage/DiskManagement.
> You'll see that Disk 0 contains your OS, and it probably
> has a single partition named "Local Disk (C:) ". But
> there can be multiple HDs, each containing multiple
> "Local Disks", each one containing an OS. And these
> "Local Disks" get renamed depending on which OS
> gets loaded and started.

Right, so when you reorder your drives on the controller
your boot redirection in boot.ini will royally screw up.

>
> When you put one HD in the system, it will always be
> at relative position 0 in the *HD* boot sequence,

> so the BIOS will pass control to it. The boot.ini file in
> the "active" partition on that HD then better refer to
> the OS as being on the HD at position rdisk(0).
>
> If you put in another HD, it can take the 2nd relative
> position in the HD boot sequence (i.e. rdisk(1) ), or the
> 1st relative position (i.e. rdisk(0) ). So, by interchanging
> the 2 HDs on the Highpoint card, you can control which
> HD the BIOS passes control to, or you can do it by
> explicitly inputing the boot sequence to the BIOS yourself.

In his case that is the HighPoint bios.

> By making the real position agree with what the boot.ini file
> assumes, you can make the OS on the 120GB HD boot up
> or not. If you don't follow any of this, you've already solved
> your problem, so don't do anything.
>
> *TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 16, 2004 2:13:29 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Folkert Rienstra" interjects as usual:

Do you have anything constructive to say, Roddy?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 17, 2004 8:47:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> snipped the entire message
news:G92dnQan2K3FQ1zcRVn-rA@comcast.com
to not appear look foolish when obviously he hasn't a single clue,
so just resorts himself to typical roddy tactics:

> "Folkert Rienstra" interjects as usual:
>
> Do you have anything constructive to say, Roddy?
>
> *TimDaniels*
!