PATA HDD data recovery

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Hi group,
I already scanned this ng and couldn't find a similar problem, so here
it is:
I have two WD200EB drives, one good, one faulty with data I would like
to recover but no so much that I pay $$$ to a recovery service.
Symptoms:
Repeating clicking sound as soon as the pc is turned on, even with the
data cable disconnected, and every time the drive is accessed.
After a while, using the setup hd detection, the bios detects the drive
with 0 heads, 0 sectors, 16383 cyls in CHS. It should be 16, 63, 38792.
So I tried all the following with no success:
- Swap the electronics pcb's. The good one still works, the faulty
doesn't.
- Swap machines, cables, power connectors, ...
- Used Western Digital utility, works on good, with faulty bangs out
with exception error. Too fast to read, probably division by zero
caused by 0 parameters. If so, congratulations programmer.
- Used mbrtool.exe to backup MBR from good, restore to faulty.
Read/Write error.
- Used Norton diskedit.exe on physical mode to read first sector from
good and write to faulty, sector not found message.
- Used dos debug for same purpose, no result.
- Cried for help to YOU, please help.

Thanks.
jss
9 answers Last reply
More about pata data recovery
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    jsantossilva@hotmail.com wrote:

    > Hi group,
    > I already scanned this ng and couldn't find a similar problem, so here
    > it is:
    > I have two WD200EB drives, one good, one faulty with data I would like
    > to recover but no so much that I pay $$$ to a recovery service.
    > Symptoms:
    > Repeating clicking sound as soon as the pc is turned on, even with the
    > data cable disconnected, and every time the drive is accessed.
    > After a while, using the setup hd detection, the bios detects the drive
    > with 0 heads, 0 sectors, 16383 cyls in CHS. It should be 16, 63, 38792.
    > So I tried all the following with no success:
    > - Swap the electronics pcb's. The good one still works, the faulty
    > doesn't.
    > - Swap machines, cables, power connectors, ...
    > - Used Western Digital utility, works on good, with faulty bangs out
    > with exception error. Too fast to read, probably division by zero
    > caused by 0 parameters. If so, congratulations programmer.
    > - Used mbrtool.exe to backup MBR from good, restore to faulty.
    > Read/Write error.
    > - Used Norton diskedit.exe on physical mode to read first sector from
    > good and write to faulty, sector not found message.
    > - Used dos debug for same purpose, no result.
    > - Cried for help to YOU, please help.

    Ding, dong, the disk is dead.

    > Thanks.
    > jss

    --
    --John
    Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Previously jsantossilva@hotmail.com wrote:
    > Hi group,
    > I already scanned this ng and couldn't find a similar problem, so here
    > it is:
    > I have two WD200EB drives, one good, one faulty with data I would like
    > to recover but no so much that I pay $$$ to a recovery service.
    > Symptoms:
    > Repeating clicking sound as soon as the pc is turned on, even with the
    > data cable disconnected, and every time the drive is accessed.
    > After a while, using the setup hd detection, the bios detects the drive
    > with 0 heads, 0 sectors, 16383 cyls in CHS. It should be 16, 63, 38792.
    > So I tried all the following with no success:
    > - Swap the electronics pcb's. The good one still works, the faulty
    > doesn't.
    > - Swap machines, cables, power connectors, ...
    > - Used Western Digital utility, works on good, with faulty bangs out
    > with exception error. Too fast to read, probably division by zero
    > caused by 0 parameters. If so, congratulations programmer.
    > - Used mbrtool.exe to backup MBR from good, restore to faulty.
    > Read/Write error.
    > - Used Norton diskedit.exe on physical mode to read first sector from
    > good and write to faulty, sector not found message.
    > - Used dos debug for same purpose, no result.
    > - Cried for help to YOU, please help.

    This seems unlikely to be recoverable without physocal repair.
    Pay somebody that knows how to repair HDD hardware (and spent a
    considerable amount of time learning it) or do without the data.

    Arno
    --
    For email address: lastname AT tik DOT ee DOT ethz DOT ch
    GnuPG: ID:1E25338F FP:0C30 5782 9D93 F785 E79C 0296 797F 6B50 1E25 338F
    "The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws" - Tacitus
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    jsantossilva@hotmail.com wrote:
    > Hi group,
    > I already scanned this ng and couldn't find a similar problem, so here
    > it is:
    > I have two WD200EB drives, one good, one faulty with data I would like
    > to recover but no so much that I pay $$$ to a recovery service.
    > Symptoms:
    > Repeating clicking sound as soon as the pc is turned on, even with the
    > data cable disconnected, and every time the drive is accessed.
    > After a while, using the setup hd detection, the bios detects the drive
    > with 0 heads, 0 sectors, 16383 cyls in CHS. It should be 16, 63, 38792.
    > So I tried all the following with no success:
    > - Swap the electronics pcb's. The good one still works, the faulty
    > doesn't.
    > - Swap machines, cables, power connectors, ...
    > - Used Western Digital utility, works on good, with faulty bangs out
    > with exception error. Too fast to read, probably division by zero
    > caused by 0 parameters. If so, congratulations programmer.
    > - Used mbrtool.exe to backup MBR from good, restore to faulty.
    > Read/Write error.
    > - Used Norton diskedit.exe on physical mode to read first sector from
    > good and write to faulty, sector not found message.
    > - Used dos debug for same purpose, no result.
    > - Cried for help to YOU, please help.
    >
    > Thanks.
    > jss
    >

    And now you know why backup is a good thing.
    --
    Cheers, Bob
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    jsantossilva@hotmail.com wrote:
    >
    <snip>

    > So I took the risk of opening my disk, not in a "clean100" room but
    > in my cellar full of dust, detected a broken head assembly gone off the
    > platter,

    Never seen this one before - normally the mechanism that prevents the
    r/w assembly from moving off the platters is pretty solid.


    Odie

    --

    RetroData
    Data Recovery Experts
    www.retrodata.co.uk
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    > Never seen this one before - normally the mechanism that prevents the
    > r/w assembly from moving off the platters is pretty solid.

    > Impressive. You are either very skillful or very lucky.

    Just to clear any doubts you might have, I reassembled the broken head
    assembly back on the good disk I had, on the exact position I found it.
    Take a look here:
    http://us.f2.yahoofs.com/bc/41d14bef_21ec/bc/photos/WD200EB.jpg?bfr.U0BBVtTO3NIC
    Watch for inserting the full http address in the browser box, probably
    you know this but there are people who don't.
    As you can see, the part of the head assembly where the voice coil is
    embedded is made of plastic and you can see it broken on the end that
    was used as a limit stop.
    As to my skills, I just used a trax (is this the correct name?)
    screwdriver for all the screws (they all have the same size and type)
    and a needle to open the heads fork to put it back on the platter.
    For your information, the disk is now completely dead after the head
    landed on the platter with that shriiiiinch.. noise due to a dust
    particle being caught between the two.
    jss
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    The picture address is wrong, I didn't realize it was a temporary
    address.
    So, please go to:
    http://f2.pg.briefcase.yahoo.com/jsantossilva2
    and once there, move the photos folder and click on the WD200EB

    jss
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    jsantossilva@hotmail.com wrote:

    >> Never seen this one before - normally the mechanism that prevents the
    >> r/w assembly from moving off the platters is pretty solid.
    >
    >> Impressive. You are either very skillful or very lucky.
    >
    > Just to clear any doubts you might have, I reassembled the broken head
    > assembly back on the good disk I had, on the exact position I found it.
    > Take a look here:
    >
    http://us.f2.yahoofs.com/bc/41d14bef_21ec/bc/photos/WD200EB.jpg?bfr.U0BBVtTO3NIC
    > Watch for inserting the full http address in the browser box, probably
    > you know this but there are people who don't.
    > As you can see, the part of the head assembly where the voice coil is
    > embedded is made of plastic and you can see it broken on the end that
    > was used as a limit stop.
    > As to my skills, I just used a trax (is this the correct name?)
    > screwdriver for all the screws (they all have the same size and type)
    > and a needle to open the heads fork to put it back on the platter.
    > For your information, the disk is now completely dead after the head
    > landed on the platter with that shriiiiinch.. noise due to a dust
    > particle being caught between the two.

    You are very lucky that you got your data back _before_ the "shriiiiinch"
    noise.

    One should not count on getting away with this. Now, would you have tried
    this if the data was worth $100? 1000? 10,000? 100,000? 1,000,000?

    > jss

    --
    --John
    Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    It's difficult to tell the value of the data I had on the disk but,
    just to be objective, I wouldn't have tried it if it was worth more
    than $300.
    That's when the professional data recovery services come in, I guess.
    jss
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Previously jsantossilva@hotmail.com wrote:
    >> Never seen this one before - normally the mechanism that prevents the
    >> r/w assembly from moving off the platters is pretty solid.

    >> Impressive. You are either very skillful or very lucky.

    [...]
    > As to my skills, I just used a trax (is this the correct name?)
    > screwdriver for all the screws (they all have the same size and type)
    > and a needle to open the heads fork to put it back on the platter.

    > For your information, the disk is now completely dead after the head
    > landed on the platter with that shriiiiinch.. noise due to a dust
    > particle being caught between the two.

    O.k., very lucky then ;-)

    Sure, if the data on such a disk is not worth much, and if there is a
    spare HDD of the same model that also has no significant worth,
    anybody may try this. And I agree, that if it works it is very nice.
    However it may (and will sooner more than later) fail and can result
    in no data recovery at all. And professional recovery from the result
    of such an attempt will be very expensive.

    So all of you that realy do not want to loose your data, paying for
    professional recovery is far, far less risky.

    All others: Give it a try ;-)

    Arno
    --
    For email address: lastname AT tik DOT ee DOT ethz DOT ch
    GnuPG: ID:1E25338F FP:0C30 5782 9D93 F785 E79C 0296 797F 6B50 1E25 338F
    "The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws" - Tacitus
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