Advice Please: Unsalvageable Hard Drive?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

I'm pretty sure I know the answer, but need confirmation that my old
hard drive is toast.

I disconnected the SCSI drives in my new system and tried this single
drive in it in hopes of getting it running so I can get the data off of
it.

I was directed to SCSI set-up, and received the options:

"Configure/View Host Adapter Settings" and "SCSI Disk Utilities". I
chose the latter.

The SCSI ID# was "0"(Firmware: 0876). Out of the options, "Format Disk"
and "Verify Disk Media", I chose the latter.

The SCSI ID# for the Seagate(ST34572N) drive was "0", and for the
Adaptec AHA-2940U2W was "7".

The final screen was as follow:
UNEXPECTED SCSI COMMAND FAILURE

Target SCSI: 0
SCSI CDB Sent: 03 00 00 00 0E 00 70 00 03 00
Host Adapter Status: 0h-No host adapter error
Target Status: 02h-Check condition
Sense Key: 03h-Medium error
+Sense Key: 31h
+Sense Code Qualifier: 00h

Any thoughts or ideas?
Thanks a lot.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
13 answers Last reply
More about advice please unsalvageable hard drive
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    Brent Rowell wrote:
    > I suspect your options are all bad news.....
    > If the data is really vital you might try a disk specialist
    >
    > My suggestion is forget it and buy another drive and remember the
    purpose of
    > backups

    I know all about it.

    All of my back-up options failed miserably when I tried them before the
    drive went down.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    What about termination? Did you enable termination on the drive?

    DaveL

    <Searcher7@mail.con2.com> wrote in message
    news:1106533490.298129.34850@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > I'm pretty sure I know the answer, but need confirmation that my old
    > hard drive is toast.
    >
    > I disconnected the SCSI drives in my new system and tried this single
    > drive in it in hopes of getting it running so I can get the data off of
    > it.
    >
    > I was directed to SCSI set-up, and received the options:
    >
    > "Configure/View Host Adapter Settings" and "SCSI Disk Utilities". I
    > chose the latter.
    >
    > The SCSI ID# was "0"(Firmware: 0876). Out of the options, "Format Disk"
    > and "Verify Disk Media", I chose the latter.
    >
    > The SCSI ID# for the Seagate(ST34572N) drive was "0", and for the
    > Adaptec AHA-2940U2W was "7".
    >
    > The final screen was as follow:
    > UNEXPECTED SCSI COMMAND FAILURE
    >
    > Target SCSI: 0
    > SCSI CDB Sent: 03 00 00 00 0E 00 70 00 03 00
    > Host Adapter Status: 0h-No host adapter error
    > Target Status: 02h-Check condition
    > Sense Key: 03h-Medium error
    > +Sense Key: 31h
    > +Sense Code Qualifier: 00h
    >
    > Any thoughts or ideas?
    > Thanks a lot.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.
    >
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    I suspect your options are all bad news.....
    If the data is really vital you might try a disk specialist

    My suggestion is forget it and buy another drive and remember the purpose of
    backups
    Brent
    <Searcher7@mail.con2.com> wrote in message
    news:1106533490.298129.34850@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > I'm pretty sure I know the answer, but need confirmation that my old
    > hard drive is toast.
    >
    > I disconnected the SCSI drives in my new system and tried this single
    > drive in it in hopes of getting it running so I can get the data off of
    > it.
    >
    > I was directed to SCSI set-up, and received the options:
    >
    > "Configure/View Host Adapter Settings" and "SCSI Disk Utilities". I
    > chose the latter.
    >
    > The SCSI ID# was "0"(Firmware: 0876). Out of the options, "Format Disk"
    > and "Verify Disk Media", I chose the latter.
    >
    > The SCSI ID# for the Seagate(ST34572N) drive was "0", and for the
    > Adaptec AHA-2940U2W was "7".
    >
    > The final screen was as follow:
    > UNEXPECTED SCSI COMMAND FAILURE
    >
    > Target SCSI: 0
    > SCSI CDB Sent: 03 00 00 00 0E 00 70 00 03 00
    > Host Adapter Status: 0h-No host adapter error
    > Target Status: 02h-Check condition
    > Sense Key: 03h-Medium error
    > +Sense Key: 31h
    > +Sense Code Qualifier: 00h
    >
    > Any thoughts or ideas?
    > Thanks a lot.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.
    >
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    Searcher7@mail.con2.com wrote:

    >
    > Brent Rowell wrote:
    >> I suspect your options are all bad news.....
    >> If the data is really vital you might try a disk specialist
    >>
    >> My suggestion is forget it and buy another drive and remember the
    > purpose of
    >> backups
    >
    > I know all about it.
    >
    > All of my back-up options failed miserably when I tried them before the
    > drive went down.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.

    Thats why I have at least two backups of "critical" stuff.

    gtoomey
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    Send drive to www.ontrack.com and have them recover it
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    "David Chien" <chiendh@uci.edu> wrote in message news:ct42cr$pjg$3@news.service.uci.edu
    > Send drive to www.ontrack.com and have them recover it

    *If* they know how to *circumvent* or *correct* a

    Sense Key: 03h-Medium error
    +Sense Code: 31h
    +Sense Code Qualifier: 00h
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    I get a clicking sound for about 10-12 repetitions and then it will
    stop for a few seconds. It will then begin again. Am I correct in
    assuming that this means there is a *physical* problem with the drive?

    When this drive first went down, I'd consistent­ly get the "Invalid
    System Disk" message(even though there ­was no floppy disk in the
    floppy drive). At that point I was forced to turn th­e PC off and
    reboot to try again.

    Now, I just tried the other two drives that were also in that same PC
    before it went down and I get the "Invalid System Disk" error with each
    one when I try them in the new system.

    These drive have been sitting around for over a year just like the
    first one, so I was wondering is it plausible that all three of them
    went bad at the same time? Could it be the result of some sort of
    virus?(Or perhaps there is something I am not doing correctly).
    Thanks.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage Searcher7@mail.con2.com wrote:
    > I get a clicking sound for about 10-12 repetitions and then it will
    > stop for a few seconds. It will then begin again. Am I correct in
    > assuming that this means there is a *physical* problem with the drive?

    > When this drive first went down, I'd consistent­ly get the "Invalid
    > System Disk" message(even though there ­was no floppy disk in the
    > floppy drive). At that point I was forced to turn th­e PC off and
    > reboot to try again.

    You get that also for a defect HDD, if it is the bootdisk.

    > Now, I just tried the other two drives that were also in that same PC
    > before it went down and I get the "Invalid System Disk" error with each
    > one when I try them in the new system.

    Aha, that sort of makes a defective disk a lot less likely. Unless
    they were all dropped, overheated, exposed to seawater or the like.

    > These drive have been sitting around for over a year just like the
    > first one, so I was wondering is it plausible that all three of them
    > went bad at the same time? Could it be the result of some sort of
    > virus?(Or perhaps there is something I am not doing correctly).

    The one thing that is really critical with SCSI is cabeling and
    termination. Do you have both last devices terminated correctly? Is
    the cable firmly plugged in at all points? Are both terminators o.k.?
    It isn unlikely, but an active terminator can die.

    Another possible problem is a weak PSU. Do the disks spin-up?
    I gater that the controller at least finds them in detection,
    correct?

    Arno
    --
    For email address: lastname AT tik DOT ee DOT ethz DOT ch
    GnuPG: ID:1E25338F FP:0C30 5782 9D93 F785 E79C 0296 797F 6B50 1E25 338F
    "The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws" - Tacitus
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    Arno Wagner wrote:
    > In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage Searcher7@mail.con2.com wrote:
    > > I get a clicking sound for about 10-12 repetitions and then it will
    > > stop for a few seconds. It will then begin again. Am I correct in
    > > assuming that this means there is a *physical* problem with the
    drive?
    >
    > > When this drive first went down, I'd consistent­ly get the
    "Invalid
    > > System Disk" message(even though there ­was no floppy disk in the
    > > floppy drive). At that point I was forced to turn th­e PC off and
    > > reboot to try again.
    >
    > You get that also for a defect HDD, if it is the bootdisk.
    >
    > > Now, I just tried the other two drives that were also in that same
    PC
    > > before it went down and I get the "Invalid System Disk" error with
    each
    > > one when I try them in the new system.
    >
    > Aha, that sort of makes a defective disk a lot less likely. Unless
    > they were all dropped, overheated, exposed to seawater or the like.
    >
    > > These drive have been sitting around for over a year just like the
    > > first one, so I was wondering is it plausible that all three of
    them
    > > went bad at the same time? Could it be the result of some sort of
    > > virus?(Or perhaps there is something I am not doing correctly).
    >
    > The one thing that is really critical with SCSI is cabeling and
    > termination. Do you have both last devices terminated correctly? Is
    > the cable firmly plugged in at all points? Are both terminators o.k.?
    > It isn unlikely, but an active terminator can die.
    >
    > Another possible problem is a weak PSU. Do the disks spin-up?
    > I gater that the controller at least finds them in detection,
    > correct?

    The system is seeing the disks, I guess. I see the brand name and model
    numbers(with at least two of them), but if I do go into SCSI utilities
    when the option presents itself, I get the invalid system disk error.

    The SCSI cable I am using has four connections(in between the SCSI
    adaptor and terminator), and I've been using the first or second one
    from the adaptor side to test each drive.(That leaves three connections
    not in use).

    I know there is nothing wrong with the terminator or power supply,
    because my three "new" hard drives are seen and work perfectly in the
    system.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    Arno Wagner wrote:
    > In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage Searcher7@mail.con2.com wrote:
    >
    > > Arno Wagner wrote:
    > [...]
    > > The system is seeing the disks, I guess. I see the brand name and
    model
    > > numbers(with at least two of them), but if I do go into SCSI
    utilities
    > > when the option presents itself, I get the invalid system disk
    error.
    >
    > That could be consistent wit a bus problem. Signalling (''commands'')
    > is done much slower than data transfer on SCSI.
    >
    > > The SCSI cable I am using has four connections(in between the SCSI
    > > adaptor and terminator), and I've been using the first or second
    one
    > > from the adaptor side to test each drive.(That leaves three
    connections
    > > not in use).
    >
    > Is the termination of the controller on? What type of SCSI?
    >
    > > I know there is nothing wrong with the terminator or power supply,
    > > because my three "new" hard drives are seen and work perfectly in
    the
    > > system.
    >
    > Unfortunately that is not a sure sign. With fast-SCSI (10MB/s,
    > 8 bit bus) I have observed that some targets and host adapters
    > work with a bus that has been terminated only at one end, while
    > others fail.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "is the termination of the controller
    on".

    The card is an Adaptec AHA-2940U2W. The hard drives that work are
    Seagate 10,000 rpm LVD drives.

    The three drives I want to get working are much slower and have lower
    data rates.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage Searcher7@mail.con2.com wrote:

    > Arno Wagner wrote:
    [...]
    > The system is seeing the disks, I guess. I see the brand name and model
    > numbers(with at least two of them), but if I do go into SCSI utilities
    > when the option presents itself, I get the invalid system disk error.

    That could be consistent wit a bus problem. Signalling (''commands'')
    is done much slower than data transfer on SCSI.

    > The SCSI cable I am using has four connections(in between the SCSI
    > adaptor and terminator), and I've been using the first or second one
    > from the adaptor side to test each drive.(That leaves three connections
    > not in use).

    Is the termination of the controller on? What type of SCSI?

    > I know there is nothing wrong with the terminator or power supply,
    > because my three "new" hard drives are seen and work perfectly in the
    > system.

    Unfortunately that is not a sure sign. With fast-SCSI (10MB/s,
    8 bit bus) I have observed that some targets and host adapters
    work with a bus that has been terminated only at one end, while
    others fail.

    Arno
    --
    For email address: lastname AT tik DOT ee DOT ethz DOT ch
    GnuPG: ID:1E25338F FP:0C30 5782 9D93 F785 E79C 0296 797F 6B50 1E25 338F
    "The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws" - Tacitus
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    O gosh, Arnie has found a thread that in all likely hood is going to span
    several screens (since this is Dirwin we are dealing with) so his use-
    net production (and consequent name spread) will go up considerably.
    And make make a fool of himself once again, as usual, but that isn't
    important, right Arnie?
    It's not important how they talk about you, just that they do.

    "Arno Wagner" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message news:3629apF4tsf2kU1@individual.net
    > In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage Searcher7@mail.con2.com wrote:
    > > I get a clicking sound for about 10-12 repetitions and then it will
    > > stop for a few seconds. It will then begin again. Am I correct in
    > > assuming that this means there is a *physical* problem with the drive?
    >
    > > When this drive first went down, I'd consistent­ly get the "Invalid
    > > System Disk" message (even though there ­was no floppy disk in the
    > > floppy drive). At that point I was forced to turn th­e PC off and
    > > reboot to try again.
    >
    > You get that also for a defect HDD, if it is the bootdisk.

    No, you don't.
    Obviously not when that message comes from the bootsector.

    >
    > > Now, I just tried the other two drives that were also in that same PC
    > > before it went down and I get the "Invalid System Disk" error with
    > > each one when I try them in the new system.
    >
    > Aha, that sort of makes a defective disk a lot less likely. Unless
    > they were all dropped, overheated, exposed to seawater or the like.

    Or not have a "valid system" on them, obviously.
    Oops, nothing so obvious with Arnie, of course.

    >
    > > These drive have been sitting around for over a year just like the
    > > first one, so I was wondering is it plausible that all three of them
    > > went bad at the same time? Could it be the result of some sort of
    > > virus? (Or perhaps there is something I am not doing correctly).
    >
    > The one thing that is really critical with SCSI is cabeling and
    > termination. Do you have both last devices terminated correctly? Is
    > the cable firmly plugged in at all points? Are both terminators o.k.?

    > It isn unlikely,

    No kidding. Tough weekend, Arnie?

    > but an active terminator can die.
    >
    > Another possible problem is a weak PSU.

    > Do the disks spin-up?

    Where do you think this "Invalid System Disk" message came from.

    > I gater that the controller at least finds them in detection, correct?
    >
    > Arno
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,comp.periphs.scsi (More info?)

    <Searcher7@mail.con2.com> wrote in message news:1107064365.103049.291120@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com
    > Arno Wagner wrote:
    > > In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage Searcher7@mail.con2.com wrote:
    > > > I get a clicking sound for about 10-12 repetitions and then it will
    > > > stop for a few seconds. It will then begin again. Am I correct in
    > > > assuming that this means there is a *physical* problem with the drive?
    > >
    > > > When this drive first went down, I'd consistent­ly get the "Invalid
    > > > System Disk" message(even though there ­was no floppy disk in the
    > > > floppy drive). At that point I was forced to turn th­e PC off and
    > > > reboot to try again.
    > >
    > > You get that also for a defect HDD, if it is the bootdisk.
    > >
    > > > Now, I just tried the other two drives that were also in that same PC
    > > > before it went down and I get the "Invalid System Disk" error with each
    > > > one when I try them in the new system.
    > >
    > > Aha, that sort of makes a defective disk a lot less likely. Unless
    > > they were all dropped, overheated, exposed to seawater or the like.
    > >
    > > > These drive have been sitting around for over a year just like the
    > > > first one, so I was wondering is it plausible that all three of them
    > > > went bad at the same time? Could it be the result of some sort of
    > > > virus?(Or perhaps there is something I am not doing correctly).
    > >
    > > The one thing that is really critical with SCSI is cabeling and
    > > termination. Do you have both last devices terminated correctly? Is
    > > the cable firmly plugged in at all points? Are both terminators o.k.?
    > > It isn unlikely, but an active terminator can die.
    > >
    > > Another possible problem is a weak PSU. Do the disks spin-up?
    > > I gater that the controller at least finds them in detection,
    > > correct?
    >
    > The system is seeing the disks, I guess. I see the brand name and model
    > numbers (with at least two of them), but if I do go into SCSI utilities
    > when the option presents itself,

    > I get the invalid system disk error.

    No you don't.

    >
    > The SCSI cable I am using has four connections(in between the SCSI
    > adaptor and terminator), and I've been using the first or second one
    > from the adaptor side to test each drive. (That leaves three connections
    > not in use).
    >
    > I know there is nothing wrong with the terminator or power supply,
    > because my three "new" hard drives are seen and work perfectly in the
    > system.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.
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