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How can i get around the 4gig file size limit problem?

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Anonymous
August 16, 2004 7:39:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

Having had great fun editing my holiday video i now have the problem that
being 1hr 50 mins long the file size is to big to save on my computer in avi
format. I get the following error message. "Your movie cannot be created
because the movie file exceeds the 4gig file size limit supported by the
current file system" I hope to create a dvd of my movie. Can anyone suggest
a way to do this without losing much video quality?
Anonymous
August 16, 2004 4:21:39 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

You need to convert your FAT32 hard drive into NTFS. Read the built in Help
& Support instructions on converting.
--
Cari ((MS-MVP Printing, Imaging & Hardware)
www.coribright.com

"Mikee D" <Mikee D@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:963496D2-D85C-4C94-A50F-AA14573BCC6E@microsoft.com...
> Having had great fun editing my holiday video i now have the problem that
> being 1hr 50 mins long the file size is to big to save on my computer in
avi
> format. I get the following error message. "Your movie cannot be created
> because the movie file exceeds the 4gig file size limit supported by the
> current file system" I hope to create a dvd of my movie. Can anyone
suggest
> a way to do this without losing much video quality?
Anonymous
August 17, 2004 3:42:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

Create a Huge File
By Neil J. Rubenking
March 2, 2004



In the early 1980s PC Magazine published a utility called Makebig, which let
you create a very large file on your hard drive. You could use a
defragmenter to move the file to the front of the hard drive, then delete
the file so you could put your swap file in that space. Is there any way to
do this now, with or without the utility?

Damien B.

We won't guarantee that forcing your swap file into a particular location
will improve performance, but you can create a file of any size using
nothing more than what's supplied with Windows. Start by converting the
desired file size into hexadecimal notation. You can use the Windows
Calculator in Scientific mode do to this. Suppose you want a file of 1
million bytes. Enter 1000000 in the calculator and click on the Hex option
to convert it (1 million in hex is F4240.) Pad the result with zeroes at the
left until the file size reaches eight digits-000F4240.


Now open a command prompt window. In Windows 95, 98, or Me, you can do this
by entering COMMAND in the Start menu's Run dialog; in Windows NT 4.0, 2000,
or XP enter CMD instead. Enter the command DEBUG BIGFILE.DAT and ignore the
File not found message. Type RCX and press Enter. Debug will display a colon
prompt. Enter the last four digits of the hexadecimal number you calculated
(4240, in our example). Type RBX and press Enter, then enter the first four
digits of the hexadecimal size (000F, in our example). Enter W for Write and
Q for Quit. You've just created a 1-million-byte file using Debug. Of course
you can create a file of any desired size using the same technique.


"Mikee D" <Mikee D@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:963496D2-D85C-4C94-A50F-AA14573BCC6E@microsoft.com...
> Having had great fun editing my holiday video i now have the problem that
> being 1hr 50 mins long the file size is to big to save on my computer in
avi
> format. I get the following error message. "Your movie cannot be created
> because the movie file exceeds the 4gig file size limit supported by the
> current file system" I hope to create a dvd of my movie. Can anyone
suggest
> a way to do this without losing much video quality?
!