Network Attached storage security on LAN?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

I have a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device on home LAN behind a Linksys
router (w/firewall) connected full time to WWW. The NAS is a backup server
that controls a USB harddrive and backs-up 4 PCs. The NAS is Linksys NSLU2
controlling a 250mb drive. I suppose this is the same issue with the
Buffalo units and any device that acts as a server on the LAN. The NSLU2 is
a Linux OS which I know nothing of.

How do I protect the disk contects on the NAS from being seen or tampered
with from someone on the WWW? Or is the firewall all I need? I not worried
about anything on the LAN, just access via WWW.

Any opinions are welcome to understand my security risks here.

Thank you!
7 answers Last reply
More about network attached storage security
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    As long as you do not punch many holes in your Linksys router, NAS would be
    fine, because it is passive (does not engage connections to public IPs).
    But you should pay a lot of attention to your active PC's, especially those
    running the most poular OS in the world. Once any of those get compromised,
    your NAS is not secure anymore.

    "jtsnow" <jtsnow@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:0pdOd.83631$Tf5.22994@lakeread03...
    > I have a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device on home LAN behind a
    Linksys
    > router (w/firewall) connected full time to WWW. The NAS is a backup
    server
    > that controls a USB harddrive and backs-up 4 PCs. The NAS is Linksys
    NSLU2
    > controlling a 250mb drive. I suppose this is the same issue with the
    > Buffalo units and any device that acts as a server on the LAN. The NSLU2
    is
    > a Linux OS which I know nothing of.
    >
    > How do I protect the disk contects on the NAS from being seen or tampered
    > with from someone on the WWW? Or is the firewall all I need? I not
    worried
    > about anything on the LAN, just access via WWW.
    >
    > Any opinions are welcome to understand my security risks here.
    >
    > Thank you!
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    ok. good point. I keep on top of the other PCs and hopefully have drilled
    into the kids heads about being careful. They have firewalls that are
    password protected and only I can change. Also virus scan every day and do
    Adaware and Spybot frequently too. So far no problems.

    good tips thanks!

    "Peter" <peterfoxghost@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
    news:36t8g9F55i29oU1@individual.net...
    > As long as you do not punch many holes in your Linksys router, NAS would
    > be
    > fine, because it is passive (does not engage connections to public IPs).
    > But you should pay a lot of attention to your active PC's, especially
    > those
    > running the most poular OS in the world. Once any of those get
    > compromised,
    > your NAS is not secure anymore.
    >
    > "jtsnow" <jtsnow@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:0pdOd.83631$Tf5.22994@lakeread03...
    >> I have a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device on home LAN behind a
    > Linksys
    >> router (w/firewall) connected full time to WWW. The NAS is a backup
    > server
    >> that controls a USB harddrive and backs-up 4 PCs. The NAS is Linksys
    > NSLU2
    >> controlling a 250mb drive. I suppose this is the same issue with the
    >> Buffalo units and any device that acts as a server on the LAN. The NSLU2
    > is
    >> a Linux OS which I know nothing of.
    >>
    >> How do I protect the disk contects on the NAS from being seen or tampered
    >> with from someone on the WWW? Or is the firewall all I need? I not
    > worried
    >> about anything on the LAN, just access via WWW.
    >>
    >> Any opinions are welcome to understand my security risks here.
    >>
    >> Thank you!
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Try this, it is better than Adaware or Spybot:
    http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/spyware/software/default.mspx

    "jtsnow" <jtsnow@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:pueOd.83716$Tf5.76188@lakeread03...
    > ok. good point. I keep on top of the other PCs and hopefully have
    drilled
    > into the kids heads about being careful. They have firewalls that are
    > password protected and only I can change. Also virus scan every day and
    do
    > Adaware and Spybot frequently too. So far no problems.
    >
    > good tips thanks!
    >
    > "Peter" <peterfoxghost@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
    > news:36t8g9F55i29oU1@individual.net...
    > > As long as you do not punch many holes in your Linksys router, NAS would
    > > be
    > > fine, because it is passive (does not engage connections to public IPs).
    > > But you should pay a lot of attention to your active PC's, especially
    > > those
    > > running the most poular OS in the world. Once any of those get
    > > compromised,
    > > your NAS is not secure anymore.
    > >
    > > "jtsnow" <jtsnow@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > news:0pdOd.83631$Tf5.22994@lakeread03...
    > >> I have a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device on home LAN behind a
    > > Linksys
    > >> router (w/firewall) connected full time to WWW. The NAS is a backup
    > > server
    > >> that controls a USB harddrive and backs-up 4 PCs. The NAS is Linksys
    > > NSLU2
    > >> controlling a 250mb drive. I suppose this is the same issue with the
    > >> Buffalo units and any device that acts as a server on the LAN. The
    NSLU2
    > > is
    > >> a Linux OS which I know nothing of.
    > >>
    > >> How do I protect the disk contects on the NAS from being seen or
    tampered
    > >> with from someone on the WWW? Or is the firewall all I need? I not
    > > worried
    > >> about anything on the LAN, just access via WWW.
    > >>
    > >> Any opinions are welcome to understand my security risks here.
    > >>
    > >> Thank you!
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    very nice...what do I owe you:) thanks!

    "Peter" <peterfoxghost@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
    news:36tb9pF515c58U1@individual.net...
    > Try this, it is better than Adaware or Spybot:
    > http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/spyware/software/default.mspx
    >
    > "jtsnow" <jtsnow@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:pueOd.83716$Tf5.76188@lakeread03...
    >> ok. good point. I keep on top of the other PCs and hopefully have
    > drilled
    >> into the kids heads about being careful. They have firewalls that are
    >> password protected and only I can change. Also virus scan every day and
    > do
    >> Adaware and Spybot frequently too. So far no problems.
    >>
    >> good tips thanks!
    >>
    >> "Peter" <peterfoxghost@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
    >> news:36t8g9F55i29oU1@individual.net...
    >> > As long as you do not punch many holes in your Linksys router, NAS
    >> > would
    >> > be
    >> > fine, because it is passive (does not engage connections to public
    >> > IPs).
    >> > But you should pay a lot of attention to your active PC's, especially
    >> > those
    >> > running the most poular OS in the world. Once any of those get
    >> > compromised,
    >> > your NAS is not secure anymore.
    >> >
    >> > "jtsnow" <jtsnow@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >> > news:0pdOd.83631$Tf5.22994@lakeread03...
    >> >> I have a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device on home LAN behind a
    >> > Linksys
    >> >> router (w/firewall) connected full time to WWW. The NAS is a backup
    >> > server
    >> >> that controls a USB harddrive and backs-up 4 PCs. The NAS is Linksys
    >> > NSLU2
    >> >> controlling a 250mb drive. I suppose this is the same issue with the
    >> >> Buffalo units and any device that acts as a server on the LAN. The
    > NSLU2
    >> > is
    >> >> a Linux OS which I know nothing of.
    >> >>
    >> >> How do I protect the disk contects on the NAS from being seen or
    > tampered
    >> >> with from someone on the WWW? Or is the firewall all I need? I not
    >> > worried
    >> >> about anything on the LAN, just access via WWW.
    >> >>
    >> >> Any opinions are welcome to understand my security risks here.
    >> >>
    >> >> Thank you!
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    jtsnow <jtsnow@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:0pdOd.83631$Tf5.22994@lakeread03...

    > I have a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device on home LAN behind a Linksys
    > router (w/firewall) connected full time to WWW. The NAS is a backup server
    > that controls a USB harddrive and backs-up 4 PCs. The NAS is Linksys NSLU2
    > controlling a 250mb drive. I suppose this is the same issue with the Buffalo
    > units and any device that acts as a server on the LAN. The NSLU2 is a Linux
    > OS which I know nothing of.

    > How do I protect the disk contects on the NAS from being seen or tampered with
    > from someone on the WWW? Or is the firewall all I need?

    Yep. Even a decent NAT router is fine for that too.

    > I not worried about anything on the LAN, just access via WWW.

    > Any opinions are welcome to understand my security risks here.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Previously jtsnow <jtsnow@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > I have a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device on home LAN behind a Linksys
    > router (w/firewall) connected full time to WWW. The NAS is a backup server
    > that controls a USB harddrive and backs-up 4 PCs. The NAS is Linksys NSLU2
    > controlling a 250mb drive. I suppose this is the same issue with the
    > Buffalo units and any device that acts as a server on the LAN. The NSLU2 is
    > a Linux OS which I know nothing of.

    > How do I protect the disk contects on the NAS from being seen or tampered
    > with from someone on the WWW? Or is the firewall all I need? I not worried
    > about anything on the LAN, just access via WWW.

    > Any opinions are welcome to understand my security risks here.

    Probably the first step is to understand better what you are doing.
    There is no WWW you can be connetced to. You likely mean the
    Internet, which is something completely different. Some basic insights
    into the network technology is needed if you want to understand your
    security situation.

    Basically a firewall is useless, unless configured matching your needs.
    If you configure it correctly, you can easily hide the NAS from the
    Internet. However you have to understand what you are doing to be able
    to do this.

    Arno
    --
    For email address: lastname AT tik DOT ee DOT ethz DOT ch
    GnuPG: ID:1E25338F FP:0C30 5782 9D93 F785 E79C 0296 797F 6B50 1E25 338F
    "The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws" - Tacitus
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Arno Wagner" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
    news:36ufbgF57f0osU1@individual.net...
    > Previously jtsnow <jtsnow@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> I have a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device on home LAN behind a Linksys
    >> router (w/firewall) connected full time to WWW. The NAS is a backup server
    >> that controls a USB harddrive and backs-up 4 PCs. The NAS is Linksys NSLU2
    >> controlling a 250mb drive. I suppose this is the same issue with the
    >> Buffalo units and any device that acts as a server on the LAN. The NSLU2 is
    >> a Linux OS which I know nothing of.
    >
    >> How do I protect the disk contects on the NAS from being seen or tampered
    >> with from someone on the WWW? Or is the firewall all I need? I not worried
    >> about anything on the LAN, just access via WWW.
    >
    >> Any opinions are welcome to understand my security risks here.
    >
    > Probably the first step is to understand better what you are doing.
    > There is no WWW you can be connetced to. You likely mean the
    > Internet, which is something completely different. Some basic insights
    > into the network technology is needed if you want to understand your
    > security situation.
    >
    > Basically a firewall is useless, unless configured matching your needs.
    > If you configure it correctly, you can easily hide the NAS from the
    > Internet. However you have to understand what you are doing to be able
    > to do this.

    Nope, not with the average hardware router/firewall.
Ask a new question

Read More

NAS / RAID LAN Storage