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Finding compatible WD harddrive circuit board?

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  • Western Digital
  • Compatibility
  • Storage
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 13, 2005 8:54:18 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

I had a power supply go out and when I installed a new one, my Western
Digital drive was no longer visible to the system. It's dead as in not
spinning. So I'm hoping to recover some files off the drive by
replacing the circuit board. So the basic question is how to know if
another WD circuit board is compatible.

My Western Digital drive is model WD1200JB-00DUA3, dated 24 July 2003,
with drive parameters LBA 234441648 and the DCM is HSBHNVJAH.

1) What specs need to match in order for the circuit boards to be
compatible (or is there another spec like the 2060-00160-001 on the
circuit board itself that has to be the same)?

2) I've seen a couple used drives advertised with the same model number
and the same drive specs but different DCM values. Is "DCM" the drive
controller model? Is the drive controller on the circuit board? Does
the DCM have to be the same?

3) If I do pull a circuit board from a drive with the same model
number, what risk am I taking if the DCM is different? Could it harm my
chances of recovering some files off the drive later with a different
circuit board?

Thanks,

Brian

More about : finding compatible harddrive circuit board

Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 14, 2005 9:13:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Brian Wilson" <bw@ccREMOVETHISms.net> wrote in message
news:evMPd.54374$uA.30696@fe1.texas.rr.com...
>I had a power supply go out and when I installed a new one, my Western Digital
>drive was no longer visible to the system. It's dead as in not spinning. So
>I'm hoping to recover some files off the drive by replacing the circuit board.
>So the basic question is how to know if another WD circuit board is compatible.
>
> My Western Digital drive is model WD1200JB-00DUA3, dated 24 July 2003, with
> drive parameters LBA 234441648 and the DCM is HSBHNVJAH.
>
> 1) What specs need to match in order for the circuit boards to be compatible
> (or is there another spec like the 2060-00160-001 on the circuit board itself
> that has to be the same)?
>
> 2) I've seen a couple used drives advertised with the same model number and
> the same drive specs but different DCM values. Is "DCM" the drive controller
> model? Is the drive controller on the circuit board? Does the DCM have to be
> the same?
>
> 3) If I do pull a circuit board from a drive with the same model number, what
> risk am I taking if the DCM is different? Could it harm my chances of
> recovering some files off the drive later with a different circuit board?

Its quite likely that even an identical logic card from
a drive with the next serial number wont work.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 14, 2005 9:13:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Rod Speed wrote:

> Its quite likely that even an identical logic card from
> a drive with the next serial number wont work.
>
>

Thanks. So would it be your guess it's the drive motor or what? Do you
know for this drive if the drive controller is on the logic card? And
does it require a clean room to change out the drive motor?

Brian
Related resources
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 14, 2005 9:13:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Brian Wilson wrote:
>
> Rod Speed wrote:
>
> > Its quite likely that even an identical logic card from
> > a drive with the next serial number wont work.
> >
> >
>
> Thanks. So would it be your guess it's the drive motor or what? Do you
> know for this drive if the drive controller is on the logic card? And
> does it require a clean room to change out the drive motor?
>
> Brian

You will be more than a little lucky to have success by swapping over
controller cards on these drives. Maybe one chance in 100 with logic
boards from drives with identical magic numbers - possibly a lot less.

The drive motor can't be changed without removing the entire platter
assembly - I wouldn't dream of even trying this, and I know that Vogon
and OnTrack would probably want a couple of thousand dollars to do it.

Odie
--

RetroData
Data Recovery Experts
www.retrodata.co.uk
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 14, 2005 10:23:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Brian Wilson <bw@ccREMOVETHISms.net> wrote in
message news:a7OPd.54412$uA.14659@fe1.texas.rr.com...
> Rod Speed wrote

>> Its quite likely that even an identical logic card from
>> a drive with the next serial number wont work.

> Thanks. So would it be your guess it's the drive motor or what?

Its almost certainly what's on the logic card that has died.

The problem is that modern high performance drives make
it hard to swap the logic card between drives, even if you
say buy two at the same time with the same numbers and
try to swap the cards between the two drives.

> Do you know for this drive if the drive controller is on the logic card?

Yes, they always are. The only electronics that isnt on the logic
card is the head preamp etc thats inside the sealed enclosure.

> And does it require a clean room to change out the drive motor?

Yes.

If you know enough about electronics you should be able to
identify the semis on the logic card that have been killed and
swap them from the good card to the dead one, but thats
not a trivial exercise with modern surface mount logic cards.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 14, 2005 10:23:46 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Rod Speed wrote:

> Its almost certainly what's on the logic card that has died.
>
> The problem is that modern high performance drives make
> it hard to swap the logic card between drives, even if you
> say buy two at the same time with the same numbers and
> try to swap the cards between the two drives.
>

Thanks. My local computer shop looked at the drive and said they could
swap out the circuit board if I could find a another good drive. So
I've found a couple drives with the same model number but the DCM values
are not the same, so I'm just trying to determine the right questions to
ask these sellers so that when I buy the drive I'll know that I'm
getting a compatible logic board and not one that might make matters worse.

Brian
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 14, 2005 10:37:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Odie Ferrous" <odie_ferrous@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:420FEA4C.BEFA5472@hotmail.com
> Brian Wilson wrote:
> > Rod Speed wrote:
> > > Its quite likely that even an identical logic card
> > > from a drive with the next serial number wont work.
> > >
> >
> > Thanks. So would it be your guess it's the drive motor or what?
> > Do you know for this drive if the drive controller is on the logic card?
> > And does it require a clean room to change out the drive motor?
> >
> > Brian
>
> You will be more than a little lucky to have success by swapping over
> controller cards on these drives. Maybe one chance in 100 with logic
> boards from drives with identical magic numbers - possibly a lot less.

So what exactly defines this very small "chance"?

>
> The drive motor can't be changed without removing the entire platter
> assembly - I wouldn't dream of even trying this, and I know that Vogon
> and OnTrack would probably want a couple of thousand dollars to do it.

Amazing how the drive makers manage to build these drives for just tens
of dollars, isn't it.

>
> Odie
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 15, 2005 11:17:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Folkert Rienstra wrote:
>
> "Odie Ferrous" <odie_ferrous@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:420FEA4C.BEFA5472@hotmail.com
> > Brian Wilson wrote:
> > > Rod Speed wrote:
> > > > Its quite likely that even an identical logic card
> > > > from a drive with the next serial number wont work.
> > > >
> > >
> > > Thanks. So would it be your guess it's the drive motor or what?
> > > Do you know for this drive if the drive controller is on the logic card?
> > > And does it require a clean room to change out the drive motor?
> > >
> > > Brian
> >
> > You will be more than a little lucky to have success by swapping over
> > controller cards on these drives. Maybe one chance in 100 with logic
> > boards from drives with identical magic numbers - possibly a lot less.
>
> So what exactly defines this very small "chance"?

You mean you don't know? Oh, dear - my estimation of you drops yet
again...


> >
> > The drive motor can't be changed without removing the entire platter
> > assembly - I wouldn't dream of even trying this, and I know that Vogon
> > and OnTrack would probably want a couple of thousand dollars to do it.
>
> Amazing how the drive makers manage to build these drives for just tens
> of dollars, isn't it.
>

I fully agree with you. But phone up Vogon or OnTrack and ask what a
complete head change will cost - especially on the WD1200JB with 3
platters and 6 heads. Or are you going to tell me that, because the
manufactures make the drives for tens of dollars, the recovery companies
will also charge that amount?


--

RetroData
Data Recovery Experts
www.retrodata.co.uk
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 15, 2005 7:54:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Brian Wilson wrote:
> I had a power supply go out and when I installed a new one, my Western
> Digital drive was no longer visible to the system. It's dead as in not
> spinning. So I'm hoping to recover some files off the drive by
> replacing the circuit board. So the basic question is how to know if
> another WD circuit board is compatible.
>
> My Western Digital drive is model WD1200JB-00DUA3, dated 24 July 2003,
> with drive parameters LBA 234441648 and the DCM is HSBHNVJAH.
>

FYI: Well I finally got a response which came from Western Digital
support. And for this particular drive, the numbers that have to match
exactly in order to swap the circuit boards are the full model number,
the drive parameters (LBA number) and the last 3 digits of the DCM
value. Brian
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 16, 2005 1:20:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Odie Ferrous" <odie_ferrous@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:4211B02F.ABB839AC@hotmail.com
> Folkert Rienstra wrote:
> > "Odie Ferrous" <odie_ferrous@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:420FEA4C.BEFA5472@hotmail.com
> > > Brian Wilson wrote:
> > > > Rod Speed wrote:
> > > > > Its quite likely that even an identical logic card
> > > > > from a drive with the next serial number wont work.
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > Thanks. So would it be your guess it's the drive motor or what?
> > > > Do you know for this drive if the drive controller is on the logic card?
> > > > And does it require a clean room to change out the drive motor?
> > > >
> > > > Brian
> > >
> > > You will be more than a little lucky to have success by swapping over
> > > controller cards on these drives. Maybe one chance in 100 with logic
> > > boards from drives with identical magic numbers - possibly a lot less.
> >
> > So what exactly defines this very small "chance"?
>
> You mean you don't know?

Nice posturing. You mean, I didn't spot your now obvious lie?

> Oh, dear - my estimation of you drops yet again...

Mine has just been reinforced.

>
>
> > >
> > > The drive motor can't be changed without removing the entire platter
> > > assembly - I wouldn't dream of even trying this, and I know that Vogon
> > > and OnTrack would probably want a couple of thousand dollars to do it.
> >
> > Amazing how the drive makers manage to build these drives for just tens
> > of dollars, isn't it.
> >
>
> I fully agree with you.
> But phone up Vogon or OnTrack and ask what a complete head change
> will cost - especially on the WD1200JB with 3 platters and 6 heads.
> Or are you going to tell me that, because the manufactures make the
> drives for tens of dollars, the recovery companies will also charge that
> amount?

Nope. Why would I want to tell you that?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 21, 2005 1:17:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Hi Brian,

I'm in the same boat as you, albeit with a WD1200JB-00CRA1 drive.

If it's any help - my LBA is the same as yours, but my DCM is
HSFHNT2CH.

I'm also looking for another drive so I can swap the circuit boards -
as I can't really afford to lose the data stored on the drive (I
know, I know - backups are your friend)
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 10, 2005 1:15:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Brian and Durzel,

I have the same issue with a WD1200JB that I bought in 2003. It just
disappeared from my pc .. and apparently has stopped replying to any
pc requests from the bios or operating system. I was wondering if
either of you have had any luck locating a 'matching' hard drive, and
if you have, if the pcb swap worked for you.

If yes, is it possible to get the source for your 'matching' hard
drive.
Thanks in advance,
Sam

P.S. Brian, we had the same numbers for the WD1200JB

MDL: WD1200JB-00DUA3
Drive Parms: LBA 234441648
DCM: FSBHCAJAH
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 29, 2005 11:37:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"sambocaesar" wrote:
> Brian and Durzel,
>
> I have the same issue with a WD1200JB that I bought in 2003.
> It just
> disappeared from my pc .. and apparently has stopped replying
> to any
> pc requests from the bios or operating system. I was
> wondering if
> either of you have had any luck locating a 'matching' hard
> drive, and
> if you have, if the pcb swap worked for you.
>
> If yes, is it possible to get the source for your 'matching'
> hard
> drive.
> Thanks in advance,
> Sam
>
> P.S. Brian, we had the same numbers for the WD1200JB
>
> MDL: WD1200JB-00DUA3
> Drive Parms: LBA 234441648
> DCM: FSBHCAJAH

Hi Brian,

I have very similar problem. I had two WD2000JB in my computer. And
both of them are gone now :lol:  probably after power malfunction.
One of them was WD2000JB-00DUA3 and the second one WD2000JB-00DUA0.

But luckily one of my friend had another WD2000JB-00DUA0 with very
similar DCM to my dead one. I swap the circuit boards and I get all of
my data. But right now I am looking for anybody with WD2000JB-00DUA3
DCM similar to DSBHNVJAH because circuit board from WD2000JB-00DUA0
didn’t work. Please let me know if you know someone.

Thanks Josef

PS I spent hours comparing both circuit boards and I din’t find any
differences. So the problem is somewhre "inside" is there any
possibility to change firmware or something??

--
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Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
April 28, 2005 7:30:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Update: Got the hard-drive back from first 'recovery services'
company. Sent it to a small firm in Toronto .. I had emailed them ..
they said they were pretty sure they could recover. I had to contact
them to follow up after they received the drive and had it for 3 days
(more of the poor communication .. here we go again!) .. then they
said they couldn't recover and had contacted Ontrack (who they have
partnership with) .. Ontrack told them, yes, they could try to
recover the drive (not much confidence in that statement). But I had
the Toronto firm send the drive back to me. I asked the tech what
exactly was wrong with the drive. He said 'lost servo marks ..
cannot calibrate' or something to that affect. I thought they could
recover anything regardless of the damage .. at least that is what
their site says. I then sent the drive to a local firm .. I
mentioned the 'lost servo marks' and they indicated they could
probably recover it (again, not a confident reply, but I guess the
10% non-recoverability claims make them not promise anything). The
local company has had it for a week. They have online status .. but
that is a waste, as no progress was ever posted except that they had
begun to attempt recovery. I patiently waited and called when the
estimated rcovery was to be completed. They indicated that they had
to try a couple of more things .. and if that fails, they'd ship my
drive back!

My guess is that they can't recover like they claim. I am beginning
to wonder about this ... there are many companies .. some appear
large (with several labs), while others are obviously small where
they operate from suites. I refuse to believe that no one can
recover this drive. The heads aren't crashing ... it powers up and
spins. No one has attempted, to my knowledge to open the drive, yet,
although I authorized it, if needed. This is like frustrating as
hell! I'm venting now. I'm expecting to have to send this drive to
one of the big firms .. I'll get charged to evaluate and tell me what
I already know! GEEZ!

Moral of the story ...
Backup! Backup! Backup! And I guess stay away from Western Digitial
drives. I've had pc's since 1982 ... (IBM XT) .. this is the first
drive problem I've ever had.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
May 30, 2005 4:32:18 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

As expected, the local firm could not recover as they said. Drive was
returned.

Sent the drive to OnTrack Data in MN. They were able to recover
entire contents (~40gb) within 4 days. It was expensive to recover,
as they indicated drive platters were damaged and they used
proprietary methods to recover. My guess is that they were damaged
from all of the failed attempts to recover by the other companies.
There were no 'clicking' noises to indicate head-scraping when I
first encountered the drive failure.

May have been less expensive had I sent the drive to OnTrack first.
So much for saving bucks going with the 'cheaper' alternatives.

I have pretty much written off all others for data recovery. If it is
critical data, just go to the leading firms, like OnTrack. From my
experience, you're taking a chance of further damaging your drives
with the lesser known 'el-cheapo' firms. This is just based on my
situation ... not that 'el-cheapo' firms can't recover in certain
scenarios. They are more apt to be able to recover software-related
issues. Hardware failures generally are beyond their capability,
especially when reconstructing data from damaged platters. The three
I used before OnTrack, all claimed they could, but they couldn't. So
what if you have cleanrooms .. doesn't mean anything.

These 3 failed to recover a drive without 'clicking' noises but no
longer detected by BIOS:

www.driveguys.com
www.databe.com
www.dti-data.com

By the way, it cost me $100 eval fee, plus 1895 to recover. If I had
sent to Ontrack first, probably would have been less .. my guess is
around 1000 to 1200 .. data was worth it to me.

Each has to decide if $1k - 2k is worth it from damaged drives.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 16, 2005 10:37:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"sambocaesar" wrote:
> As expected, the local firm could not recover as they said.
> Drive was
> returned.
>
> Sent the drive to OnTrack Data in MN. They were able to
> recover
> entire contents (~40gb) within 4 days. It was expensive to
> recover,
> as they indicated drive platters were damaged and they used
> proprietary methods to recover. My guess is that they were
> damaged
> from all of the failed attempts to recover by the other
> companies.
> There were no 'clicking' noises to indicate head-scraping when
> I
> first encountered the drive failure.
>
> May have been less expensive had I sent the drive to OnTrack
> first.
> So much for saving bucks going with the 'cheaper'
> alternatives.
>
> I have pretty much written off all others for data recovery.
> If it is
> critical data, just go to the leading firms, like OnTrack.
> From my
> experience, you're taking a chance of further damaging your
> drives
> with the lesser known 'el-cheapo' firms. This is just based
> on my
> situation ... not that 'el-cheapo' firms can't recover in
> certain
> scenarios. They are more apt to be able to recover
> software-related
> issues. Hardware failures generally are beyond their
> capability,
> especially when reconstructing data from damaged platters.
> The three
> I used before OnTrack, all claimed they could, but they
> couldn't. So
> what if you have cleanrooms .. doesn't mean anything.
>
> These 3 failed to recover a drive without 'clicking' noises
> but no
> longer detected by BIOS:
>
> www.driveguys.com
> www.databe.com
> www.dti-data.com
>
> By the way, it cost me $100 eval fee, plus 1895 to recover.
> If I had
> sent to Ontrack first, probably would have been less .. my
> guess is
> around 1000 to 1200 .. data was worth it to me.
>
> Each has to decide if $1k - 2k is worth it from damaged
> drives.

Brian, was you ever able to fix your Hard Drive? I now have a smilar
problem. The Disk drive Spindle chip has a burn mark in it. So it no
longer spins up. (The smallest of the chips). A recovery company said
they would get a similar chip (as they could not get the exact one
from WD). They would Ask WD about the firmware and modify it to
accomodate the chip they would replace. Cost 740 uk pounds for a 50
pound disk.

However, I am now looking for a circuit board, but only if I know
there is a chance of getting the data off the disk.

Details;
MDL: WD1200JB-00EVA0 (The 00 is the distributer, EV the Revision, A0
the firmware.)
Date: 6 May 2004
DCM: HSBHCTJAH The JAH refers to the Head assemby.

If I can find the chip (which has scorch mark through it), I would
replace the chip, but I can’t read the number.

Does anyone out there have this exact model in working order. I would
purchase it from them or give them a brand new higher capacity drive
in exchange.

Bob.

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Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 19, 2005 4:37:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"BobbyUK" wrote:
> Brian, was you ever able to fix your Hard Drive? I now have a
> smilar problem. The Disk drive Spindle chip has a burn mark
> in it. So it no longer spins up. (The smallest of the chips).
> A recovery company said they would get a similar chip (as they
> could not get the exact one from WD). They would Ask WD about
> the firmware and modify it to accomodate the chip they would
> replace. Cost 740 uk pounds for a 50 pound disk.
>
> However, I am now looking for a circuit board, but only if I
> know there is a chance of getting the data off the disk.
>
> Details;
> MDL: WD1200JB-00EVA0 (The 00 is the distributer, EV the
> Revision, A0 the firmware.)
> Date: 6 May 2004
> DCM: HSBHCTJAH The JAH refers to the Head assemby.
>
> If I can find the chip (which has scorch mark through it), I
> would replace the chip, but I can't read the number.
>
> Does anyone out there have this exact model in working order.
> I would purchase it from them or give them a brand new higher
> capacity drive in exchange.
>
> Bob.

I have cut and pasted this from another forum which helped me repair
my Hard disk.

Hard Drive Repair Success – thanks to Action Forum, by changing the
Firmware Chip at the U12 Position on the Circuit Board. A Board swap
does not always work, as you have to match the Firmware on the Disk
Platters with the Firmware on the Serial Chip on the board. If the
original board is blown, it usually will not spin up. By swapping the
board, the drive will spin up but may not be recognised in bios of the
PC. If it is seen by Bios, you may not see any data. You will have
to swap the Firmware chip to the good board to be able to see the
data. Also the DCM code should match as should the serial number in
full.

http://forums.actionfront.com/showthread.php?t=635

Yes, I have repaired the hard disk, much to my amazement and
happiness.
When I described the problem in detail to data recovery companies in
the UK, I think they knew what the problem was and how quickly it
would be fixed, but they all gave me the “White Room Recovery” line.
However, I had read that 95% of all data recovery was possible without
opening the hard disk and accessing the platters, so I persisted in
trying to find out. Luckily for me I came across Action Fronts Web
site.
I work in Helpdesk support, but we keep good backups at work. This
disk was my friends who is a wedding photographer and had not backed
up his data.

How I did it.
On the blown board, I used dentist type tools (bought from Maplins, a
local electronics store) to lift up the legs of the chip from one
side, while heating them up with my standard soldering iron. I managed
to bend the legs and lift up one of the pads and the track. I heated
each pin again, and used a sharp point to separate the solder from the
legs. On the otherside of the chip, I used the side of the soldering
iron and managed to heat the four pins and push the chip off the pads.

Having practiced with the blown board, I used a pair or tweezers to
hold the chip nearest the pins being heated on the good circuit board,
and heated all the pins and pulling on the chip. The chip raised up
but the solder underneath also lifted up in points. I heated each pin
and used a sharp point to separate the solder from the pins. I then
heated the legs on the other side of the chip and pushed the chip away
from the pads.

I soldered one leg from the required chip, onto the donor new circuit
board. Posited the other legs and heated all the legs, one side at a
time. Reassembled the board onto the faulty drive and inserted the
drive into my PC Caddy. When I powered up the PC, the Bios recognised
the drive as a Western Digital and the PC booted up normally. Opening
Windows Explorer I saw the drive. I made a new folder on another
drive, highlighted all the files from the now fixed drive and dragged
all the files to the new folder. The files started copying 80Gb of
data and said it would take 70 minutes. It is currently copying the
data. To all intents and purposes, the drive is now OK but I am
copying it just in case my friend messes up again. The drive came from
an external USB Caddy, with an external power supply, which must have
surged. Now the new drive is no longer working as I have removed it’s
Circuit board and it is on the old faulty drive but it was a necessary
80 Pounds spent, getting it from ebay and shipping it from Germany to
the UK.

Removing the IC was not easy without the proper tools. The tools I
used and the method I used was not the correct one. I have seen it
done properly on the internet with a proper hot air gun and a solution
called Quick Chip. I may have damaged the pads and circuit board of
the donor board and would have been down 80 UK pounds, but all worked
out. I also bought security screw driver, a new soldering iron (my old
one died last year), and a magnifying glass with bulb. (I now wish I
had bought one with a tube light as the bulb kept burning my hand,
well made it very hot !!), dentist type tools and a pack of tweezers.
Plus trying to find some time to sit down and fix the board.

Now that I know what is involved, and know where the problem lies, I
would be more inclined to barging with the Data Recovery company or
some other company who specialises in soldering and has a rework
station to exchange the chips. The cheapest data recovery I found in
the UK, was 300 pounds.

Thank you Action Front and thanks especially to John and Dmitry of
Action Front and the Guru. The internet has indeed been used for what
it was indented; the exchange of information and helping ones fellow
man.

Thanks Once Again.

Amit.

** If this post helped you, please send me an e-mail. I always like
to hear of a successful outcome. AmitVirdi.remove@hotmail.com
Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 20, 2005 11:08:12 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"BobbyUK" <DoNotEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote in message news:7_299399_797918e70b215e5d95a8860a34a4b833@hardwareforumz.com
> "BobbyUK" wrote:
> > Brian, was you ever able to fix your Hard Drive? I now have a
> > smilar problem. The Disk drive Spindle chip has a burn mark
> > in it. So it no longer spins up. (The smallest of the chips).
> > A recovery company said they would get a similar chip (as they
> > could not get the exact one from WD). They would Ask WD about
> > the firmware and modify it to accomodate the chip they would
> > replace. Cost 740 uk pounds for a 50 pound disk.
> >
> > However, I am now looking for a circuit board, but only if I
> > know there is a chance of getting the data off the disk.
> >
> > Details;
> > MDL: WD1200JB-00EVA0 (The 00 is the distributer, EV the
> > Revision, A0 the firmware.)
> > Date: 6 May 2004
> > DCM: HSBHCTJAH The JAH refers to the Head assemby.
> >
> > If I can find the chip (which has scorch mark through it), I
> > would replace the chip, but I can't read the number.
> >
> > Does anyone out there have this exact model in working order.
> > I would purchase it from them or give them a brand new higher
> > capacity drive in exchange.
> >
> > Bob.
>
> I have cut and pasted this from another forum which helped me repair
> my Hard disk.
>
> Hard Drive Repair Success – thanks to Action Forum, by changing the
> Firmware Chip at the U12 Position on the Circuit Board.

> A Board swap
> does not always work, as you have to match the Firmware on the Disk
> Platters with the Firmware on the Serial Chip on the board.

The serial chip does not have the firmware. It's not big enough for that.

> If the original board is blown, it usually will not spin up. By swapping the
> board, the drive will spin up but may not be recognised in bios of the
> PC. If it is seen by Bios, you may not see any data.

> You will have to swap the Firmware chip

The CMOS chip that holds the specific parameters needed for that particular drive

> to the good board to be able to see the data.

> Also the DCM code should match as should the serial number in full.

That's not what I read there.

>
> http://forums.actionfront.com/showthread.php?t=635
>
> Yes, I have repaired the hard disk, much to my amazement and happiness.
> When I described the problem in detail to data recovery companies in
> the UK, I think they knew what the problem was and how quickly it
> would be fixed, but they all gave me the “White Room Recovery” line.
> However, I had read that 95% of all data recovery was possible without
> opening the hard disk and accessing the platters, so I persisted in
> trying to find out. Luckily for me I came across Action Fronts Web site.
> I work in Helpdesk support, but we keep good backups at work. This
> disk was my friends who is a wedding photographer and had not backed
> up his data.
>
> How I did it.

[snip]
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 4, 2005 5:28:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Actually the serial flash can and does hold the firmware.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 6, 2005 4:49:46 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"lazinator" <laslo@actionfront.com> wrote in message news:1123187311.982949.207480@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com
> Actually the serial flash can and does hold the firmware.

You're right if the flash is a 25F4096 (4 Mbit) or similar.
Apparently serial Flash Eeproms have grown significantly
to sizes of parallel Eproms from just a few years back.
November 24, 2008 1:57:40 PM

Speaking of damaged hard drives, couple of months back my 500gb Seagate died - out of blue, giving no warnings it started making weird noises, stopped showing in BIOS, to describe what I lived through while looking for the answers to the situation is unspeakable as the drive had everything on it (practically all my life). Finally, the guy at work had a look at it and said that I need a "professional data recovery", if I ever want to see my files again. Sadly, but I had no idea what exactly "professional data recovery" was, buy it sounded like a hope. I went on the Internet, as they say: When you do not read the media - you are not informed, when you read the media - you are misinformed". That is exactly what happened to me. The companies offering their data recovery service were uncounted; more or less each one of them sounded like they could do anything, but not all of them had a feature: to charge only when I see what is recovered and happy with it, plus no any sorts of evaluation or diagnostic fees. The site offered all that plus at the firm price of $890 USD for the drive of 500gb, which was totally unheard (pretty awesome!) for the "extensive data recovery level", as the other places (including Seagate recovery) I browsed quoted me in range of $1700-2800 USD!!!! Outrageous!!!
Anyway, I sent the drive to to Toronto, they had recovered the data and even recovered the operating system and offered to make a clone of the old drive, I decided to go with the option for HDD-clone ($100), plus data backup on my external Maxtor 750gb (just in case you cannot be too sure once you lost it). So, got everything back in about 12 days and could not be any happier in my life. I popped the clone into my HP and it started booting and looking just the way it was before. What guys at Databe did is simply amazing and I never thank them enough and I pretty proud of myself that I made a right choice by choosing them for my data loss disaster. Oh! The other thing the website has that you can log into your case and see all updates on your drive-in-work. No worries, ok! no extra worries! Happy end!


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