Need advice to open(dismantle) my Seagate drive

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Hi,
I have a Seagate ST310212A 10GB hard disk.
Recently it stop working and start doing that sound: clock, clock,
clock.

Of course, we don't have a backup. And I buyed the same disk to try to
recover the data. First, I will exchange the electronic board to see if
I can revive the drive.

But if that does not work, I will try opening the drive and exchange
the disk platter. So, I need some advice about this Seagate drive:
- what kind of screw do they have inside? The ones that hold the
platter.
I know that it have only 1 platter and maybe T-6 Screws.
- is it easy or hard to unscrew the platter?
- any tips for doing this? ie. do it inside a plastic bag, use glows,
etc, etc.

Many thanks
Oliver
23 answers Last reply
More about need advice open dismantle seagate drive
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    oliversl wrote:

    > Hi,
    > I have a Seagate ST310212A 10GB hard disk.
    > Recently it stop working and start doing that sound: clock, clock,
    > clock.
    >
    > Of course, we don't have a backup. And I buyed the same disk to try to
    > recover the data. First, I will exchange the electronic board to see if
    > I can revive the drive.
    >
    > But if that does not work, I will try opening the drive and exchange
    > the disk platter. So, I need some advice about this Seagate drive:
    > - what kind of screw do they have inside? The ones that hold the
    > platter.
    > I know that it have only 1 platter and maybe T-6 Screws.
    > - is it easy or hard to unscrew the platter?
    > - any tips for doing this? ie. do it inside a plastic bag, use glows,
    > etc, etc.

    Taking the thing apart is not difficult. Putting it back together in such a
    manner that it works you're not going to accomplish with hardware-store
    tools. The hard part is aligning the platters so that the tracks remain
    concentric with the spindle to within the limits that the feedback-control
    mechanism on the head positioners can handle.

    In other words, if you _need_ the data then send it out to Ontrack or some
    other outfit that knows what they are doing. If you're doing this to learn
    things you'll find it "interesting" in the sense of "may you live in
    interesting times".

    > Many thanks
    > Oliver

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "oliversl" <news.oliver@samera.com.py> wrote in message
    news:1109433127.771926.196180@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    > Hi,
    > I have a Seagate ST310212A 10GB hard disk.
    > Recently it stop working and start doing that sound: clock, clock,
    > clock.
    >
    > Of course, we don't have a backup. And I buyed the same disk to try to
    > recover the data. First, I will exchange the electronic board to see if
    > I can revive the drive.
    >
    > But if that does not work, I will try opening the drive and exchange
    > the disk platter. So, I need some advice about this Seagate drive:
    > - what kind of screw do they have inside? The ones that hold the
    > platter.
    > I know that it have only 1 platter and maybe T-6 Screws.
    > - is it easy or hard to unscrew the platter?
    > - any tips for doing this? ie. do it inside a plastic bag, use glows,
    > etc, etc.
    >
    > Many thanks
    > Oliver
    >
    YOU MUST BE JOKEING.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Pete" <Pete@anon.com> wrote in message news:zpbUd.36919$by5.35354@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com
    > "oliversl" <news.oliver@samera.com.py> wrote in message news:1109433127.771926.196180@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    > > Hi,
    > > I have a Seagate ST310212A 10GB hard disk.
    > > Recently it stop working and start doing that sound: clock, clock, clock.
    > >
    > > Of course, we don't have a backup. And I buyed the same disk to try to
    > > recover the data. First, I will exchange the electronic board to see if
    > > I can revive the drive.
    > >
    > > But if that does not work, I will try opening the drive and exchange
    > > the disk platter. So, I need some advice about this Seagate drive:
    > > - what kind of screw do they have inside? The ones that hold the
    > > platter.
    > > I know that it have only 1 platter and maybe T-6 Screws.
    > > - is it easy or hard to unscrew the platter?
    > > - any tips for doing this? ie. do it inside a plastic bag, use glows,
    > > etc, etc.
    > >
    > > Many thanks
    > > Oliver
    > >
    > YOU MUST BE JOKEING.

    Nope, people that prefer to take the platters out instead of just replacing
    the defective Head stack are never joking. They wouldn't know how.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    J. Clarke wrote:
    > oliversl wrote:
    >
    > > Hi,
    > > I have a Seagate ST310212A 10GB hard disk.
    > > Recently it stop working and start doing that sound: clock, clock,
    > > clock.
    > >
    > > Of course, we don't have a backup. And I buyed the same disk to try
    to
    > > recover the data. First, I will exchange the electronic board to
    see if
    > > I can revive the drive.
    > >
    > > But if that does not work, I will try opening the drive and
    exchange
    > > the disk platter. So, I need some advice about this Seagate drive:
    > > - what kind of screw do they have inside? The ones that hold the
    > > platter.
    > > I know that it have only 1 platter and maybe T-6 Screws.
    > > - is it easy or hard to unscrew the platter?
    > > - any tips for doing this? ie. do it inside a plastic bag, use
    glows,
    > > etc, etc.
    >
    > Taking the thing apart is not difficult. Putting it back together in
    such a
    > manner that it works you're not going to accomplish with
    hardware-store
    > tools. The hard part is aligning the platters so that the tracks
    remain
    > concentric with the spindle to within the limits that the
    feedback-control
    > mechanism on the head positioners can handle.
    >
    > In other words, if you _need_ the data then send it out to Ontrack or
    some
    > other outfit that knows what they are doing. If you're doing this to
    learn
    > things you'll find it "interesting" in the sense of "may you live in
    > interesting times".
    >
    > > Many thanks
    > > Oliver
    >
    > --
    > --John
    > to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    > (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Hi John,
    many thanks for your comments.
    I didn't know that the difficult part was to put things together.
    I know that some friend has done this kind of thing successfully in the
    past, so I wanted to do the same thing.
    I will talk to this person to see if he can do the job or maybe hire
    him :)

    Regards,
    Oliver
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On 2005-02-26 16:52, oliversl wrote:
    > Hi,
    > I have a Seagate ST310212A 10GB hard disk.
    > Recently it stop working and start doing that sound: clock, clock,
    > clock.
    >
    > Of course, we don't have a backup. And I buyed the same disk to try to
    > recover the data. First, I will exchange the electronic board to see if
    > I can revive the drive.
    >
    > But if that does not work, I will try opening the drive and exchange
    > the disk platter. So, I need some advice about this Seagate drive:
    > - what kind of screw do they have inside? The ones that hold the
    > platter.
    > I know that it have only 1 platter and maybe T-6 Screws.
    > - is it easy or hard to unscrew the platter?
    > - any tips for doing this? ie. do it inside a plastic bag, use glows,
    > etc, etc.
    >
    > Many thanks
    > Oliver
    >

    Taking the drive apart & putting it together again successfully is not
    easy, and requires a very clean environment, or the heads will crash on
    the first speck of dust it encounters, destorying the surface.

    Many years ago there was an issue with heads sticking to the platters,
    preventing the spinup. If this is the case here, I don't know, but a way
    of helping the drive in those cases was to hold the drive in hand while
    powering up, and quickly rotate the drive around the spinning axis,
    sometimes it was enough to get it up to speed. I'd at least try that
    method before taking anything apart.

    /Rolf
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Previously Rolf Blom <allspam@round.bin> wrote:
    > On 2005-02-26 16:52, oliversl wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >> I have a Seagate ST310212A 10GB hard disk.
    >> Recently it stop working and start doing that sound: clock, clock,
    >> clock.
    >>
    >> Of course, we don't have a backup. And I buyed the same disk to try to
    >> recover the data. First, I will exchange the electronic board to see if
    >> I can revive the drive.
    >>
    >> But if that does not work, I will try opening the drive and exchange
    >> the disk platter. So, I need some advice about this Seagate drive:
    >> - what kind of screw do they have inside? The ones that hold the
    >> platter.
    >> I know that it have only 1 platter and maybe T-6 Screws.
    >> - is it easy or hard to unscrew the platter?
    >> - any tips for doing this? ie. do it inside a plastic bag, use glows,
    >> etc, etc.
    >>
    >> Many thanks
    >> Oliver
    >>

    > Taking the drive apart & putting it together again successfully is not
    > easy, and requires a very clean environment, or the heads will crash on
    > the first speck of dust it encounters, destorying the surface.

    It is educational and may even work in some cases. It is not something
    you should do for critical data unless you have experience, a clean
    room and the right tools.

    > Many years ago there was an issue with heads sticking to the platters,
    > preventing the spinup. If this is the case here, I don't know, but a way
    > of helping the drive in those cases was to hold the drive in hand while
    > powering up, and quickly rotate the drive around the spinning axis,
    > sometimes it was enough to get it up to speed. I'd at least try that
    > method before taking anything apart.

    In that specific case, puttin the drive into the freezer for some hours
    (airtight plastic bag!) might also help to un-stick the heads.

    Arno
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Rolf Blom wrote:

    > On 2005-02-26 16:52, oliversl wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >> I have a Seagate ST310212A 10GB hard disk.
    >> Recently it stop working and start doing that sound: clock, clock,
    >> clock.
    >>
    >> Of course, we don't have a backup. And I buyed the same disk to try to
    >> recover the data. First, I will exchange the electronic board to see if
    >> I can revive the drive.
    >>
    >> But if that does not work, I will try opening the drive and exchange
    >> the disk platter. So, I need some advice about this Seagate drive:
    >> - what kind of screw do they have inside? The ones that hold the
    >> platter.
    >> I know that it have only 1 platter and maybe T-6 Screws.
    >> - is it easy or hard to unscrew the platter?
    >> - any tips for doing this? ie. do it inside a plastic bag, use glows,
    >> etc, etc.
    >>
    >> Many thanks
    >> Oliver
    >>
    >
    > Taking the drive apart & putting it together again successfully is not
    > easy, and requires a very clean environment, or the heads will crash on
    > the first speck of dust it encounters, destorying the surface.

    Not quite--the first speck of dust _small enough to go under the head but
    large enough to hit it_--at the clearances in modern drives that's a pretty
    small speck. If it's larger than that the head will usually just push it
    aside. On the other hand, watch out for fingerprints--I once saw a
    fingerprint rip a head right off and throw it across the room--fortunately
    it didn't hit anybody.

    > Many years ago there was an issue with heads sticking to the platters,
    > preventing the spinup. If this is the case here, I don't know, but a way
    > of helping the drive in those cases was to hold the drive in hand while
    > powering up, and quickly rotate the drive around the spinning axis,
    > sometimes it was enough to get it up to speed. I'd at least try that
    > method before taking anything apart.
    >
    > /Rolf

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in message news:cvvri3020ua@news2.newsguy.com
    > Rolf Blom wrote:
    > > On 2005-02-26 16:52, oliversl wrote:
    > > > Hi,
    > > > I have a Seagate ST310212A 10GB hard disk.
    > > > Recently it stop working and start doing that sound: clock, clock, clock.
    > > >
    > > > Of course, we don't have a backup. And I buyed the same disk to try to
    > > > recover the data. First, I will exchange the electronic board to see if
    > > > I can revive the drive.
    > > >
    > > > But if that does not work, I will try opening the drive and exchange
    > > > the disk platter. So, I need some advice about this Seagate drive:
    > > > - what kind of screw do they have inside? The ones that hold the
    > > > platter.
    > > > I know that it have only 1 platter and maybe T-6 Screws.
    > > > - is it easy or hard to unscrew the platter?
    > > > - any tips for doing this? ie. do it inside a plastic bag, use glows,
    > > > etc, etc.
    > > >
    > > > Many thanks
    > > > Oliver
    > > >
    > >
    > > Taking the drive apart & putting it together again successfully is not
    > > easy, and requires a very clean environment, or the heads will crash on
    > > the first speck of dust it encounters, destorying the surface.
    >
    > Not quite--the first speck of dust _small enough to go under the head but
    > large enough to hit it_--at the clearances in modern drives that's a pretty
    > small speck. If it's larger than that the head will usually just push it
    > aside.

    If the rotation speed doesn't shoot it off into the particle filter first.

    > On the other hand, watch out for fingerprints--I once saw a
    > fingerprint rip a head right off

    > and throw it across the room--

    Must be some time ago. ;-)

    > fortunately it didn't hit anybody.
    >
    > > Many years ago there was an issue with heads sticking to the platters,
    > > preventing the spinup. If this is the case here, I don't know, but a way
    > > of helping the drive in those cases was to hold the drive in hand while
    > > powering up, and quickly rotate the drive around the spinning axis,
    > > sometimes it was enough to get it up to speed. I'd at least try that
    > > method before taking anything apart.
    > >
    > > /Rolf
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Well, we did it.
    We dismantle the HD and switched the platters, but ...
    we have a problem with the magnetic heads.

    It was a dual head, so, putting the head on the platters
    was the big problem.

    I must say that this person that has done the job has a
    total disregard for hard drive live :)

    The room was not too clean, there was even wind
    flowing. But, all this was ok, our problem was the magnetic heads.

    So, here are my tips for dismantling a hard drive:
    - be very carefully with the heads
    - try to be extra carefully when moving the heads of
    the platter. The head rest in the inner side of the
    platters, so you need to move all the way out and the
    separate the head in order to put them on the new
    platter again
    - remember, be carefully with the heads ;)

    Thanks for all your comments

    Anyway, it was a cool experience.
    Oliver
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Oliver Schulze wrote:

    > Well, we did it.
    > We dismantle the HD and switched the platters, but ...
    > we have a problem with the magnetic heads.
    >
    > It was a dual head, so, putting the head on the platters
    > was the big problem.
    >
    > I must say that this person that has done the job has a
    > total disregard for hard drive live :)
    >
    > The room was not too clean, there was even wind
    > flowing. But, all this was ok, our problem was the magnetic heads.
    >
    > So, here are my tips for dismantling a hard drive:
    > - be very carefully with the heads
    > - try to be extra carefully when moving the heads of
    > the platter. The head rest in the inner side of the
    > platters, so you need to move all the way out and the
    > separate the head in order to put them on the new
    > platter again
    > - remember, be carefully with the heads ;)
    >
    > Thanks for all your comments

    Did it actually run and allow you to recover your data?

    > Anyway, it was a cool experience.
    > Oliver

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    I could not recover any data :(
    But, I think if we have had the correct tool for putting the head in
    the platter without doing any harm, we could have been successfull.

    Also, if the disk have only one head helps a lot.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Arno Wagner wrote:
    >
    > > Many years ago there was an issue with heads sticking to the platters,
    > > preventing the spinup. If this is the case here, I don't know, but a way
    > > of helping the drive in those cases was to hold the drive in hand while
    > > powering up, and quickly rotate the drive around the spinning axis,
    > > sometimes it was enough to get it up to speed. I'd at least try that
    > > method before taking anything apart.
    >
    > In that specific case, puttin the drive into the freezer for some hours
    > (airtight plastic bag!) might also help to un-stick the heads.

    This drive (and nearly all in recent years) doesn't have an issue with
    sticking heads - the head surface is coated with a teflon-like substance
    that will resist sticking.

    It's not unlikely that the motor itself has seized.

    This can be remedied by opening the drive up and, once powered on,
    manually turning the spindle to get the motor going. As has been said,
    dust will be a problem here; if done in a "clean-ish" environment you
    should be ok to get most of the data off, but don't use the drive
    again. And get the cover on as soon as the drive is spinning.

    Another thing about the heads is that they are so fragile it is
    difficult to even touch one with a finger without knocking it out of
    alignment with the arm - so if the head did in fact stick to the
    platters, powering up the drive would wreck it.

    Of course, the motor itself could be dead - in which case replacing the
    head stack is not going to be an option.

    I try to avoid opening drives - it's a nightmare.


    Odie
    --
    Retrodata
    www.retrodata.co.uk
    Globally Local Data Recovery Experts
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Oliver Schulze" <news.oliver@samera.com.py> wrote in message news:1111001252.403550.91600@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com
    > I could not recover any data :(
    > But, I think if we have had the correct tool for putting the head in
    > the platter without doing any harm, we could have been successfull.

    And if you had done the obvious instead of the impossible
    to do, you might have even pulled it off.

    >
    > Also, if the disk have only one head helps a lot.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Odie Ferrous" <odie_ferrous@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:4238EF60.208543B0@hotmail.com
    > Arno Wagner wrote:
    > >
    > > > Many years ago there was an issue with heads sticking to the platters,
    > > > preventing the spinup. If this is the case here, I don't know, but a way
    > > > of helping the drive in those cases was to hold the drive in hand while
    > > > powering up, and quickly rotate the drive around the spinning axis,
    > > > sometimes it was enough to get it up to speed. I'd at least try that
    > > > method before taking anything apart.
    > >
    > > In that specific case, puttin the drive into the freezer for some hours
    > > (airtight plastic bag!) might also help to un-stick the heads.
    >
    > This drive (and nearly all in recent years) doesn't have an issue with
    > sticking heads - the head surface is coated with a teflon-like substance
    > that will resist sticking.
    >
    > It's not unlikely that the motor itself has seized.
    >
    > This can be remedied by opening the drive up and, once powered on,
    > manually turning the spindle to get the motor going. As has been said,
    > dust will be a problem here; if done in a "clean-ish" environment you
    > should be ok to get most of the data off,

    If dust is a problem it dies immediately. If it doesn't die immediately then
    it will likely be OK as long as it spins. The drive is the most vulnarable at
    the spinup phase. When it is spinning at 7200 rpm dust will never reach the
    platters and dust that was on the platters will have been catapulted off the
    platters long before it reaches nominal speed, only at which time the heads
    will leave the park position.

    > but don't use the drive again.

    The partical filter should catch any loose particals.

    > And get the cover on as soon as the drive is spinning.
    >
    > Another thing about the heads is that they are so fragile it is
    > difficult to even touch one with a finger without knocking it out of
    > alignment with the arm - so if the head did in fact stick to the
    > platters, powering up the drive would wreck it.

    So how can you ever have a drive with stiction if "powering up the drive
    would wreck it" and therefor immediately release the state of stiction.
    It is called stiction (static friction) because the drive motor is unable to
    get the platters into motion as a result of the head(s) sticking to the platters.

    >
    > Of course, the motor itself could be dead - in which case replacing the
    > head stack is not going to be an option.
    >
    > I try to avoid opening drives - it's a nightmare.
    >
    >
    > Odie
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    You are about to endeavor on a monumental task. Before you began
    thinking about dismantling a hard drive did you do some research as to
    how those things are manufactured?

    Interfering with a hard drive platter is not a wise thing to do. HDs
    are manufactured in a clean-room environment and if opened and
    reassembled by an end user the drive will not function. Tiny
    microscopic dust particles [undetectable with the naked eyes] get on
    the platters and when the drive spins-up, the platters inside will
    disintegrate.

    The RPM of the platters inside is so great, those tiny particles that
    found themselves on the platters becomes solid and bombard the inside
    of the enclosure and cause damage to the platters.

    Open a hard drive at your own risk.
  17. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    > Interfering with a hard drive platter is not a wise thing to do. HDs
    > are manufactured in a clean-room environment and if opened and
    > reassembled by an end user the drive will not function. Tiny
    > microscopic dust particles [undetectable with the naked eyes] get on
    > the platters and when the drive spins-up, the platters inside will
    > disintegrate.

    Wow! Disintegrate !?! To pieces, dust or just vaporize?
  18. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    modiftek wrote:

    > You are about to endeavor on a monumental task. Before you began
    > thinking about dismantling a hard drive did you do some research as to
    > how those things are manufactured?
    >
    > Interfering with a hard drive platter is not a wise thing to do. HDs
    > are manufactured in a clean-room environment and if opened and
    > reassembled by an end user the drive will not function. Tiny
    > microscopic dust particles [undetectable with the naked eyes] get on
    > the platters and when the drive spins-up, the platters inside will
    > disintegrate.
    >
    > The RPM of the platters inside is so great, those tiny particles that
    > found themselves on the platters becomes solid and bombard the inside
    > of the enclosure and cause damage to the platters.
    >
    > Open a hard drive at your own risk.

    Bzzt. Not the problem. The problem is that the heads ride so close do the
    surface that they bump into just about any particle on the disk and if it's
    just the right size then it scratches the head or the surface or if it's a
    little bigger and stuck down hard it cracks the head. Once the head is
    damaged it acts as a cutting tool and removes the coating from the surface
    of the disk. I've seen a fingerprint rip the head right off and throw it
    across the room.

    Nonetheless, there are enough reports of users having opened drives and then
    run them successfully that the notion that opening the capsule is instant
    and certain destruction is clearly in error.

    Further, in no case will the platters "disintegrate". They are not that
    fragile.

    The RPM of the platters is not all that great, ranging from redline for a
    typical Detroit ironblock engine to that of a good motorcycle, all of which
    are running under vastly greater stress and in a far dirtier environment
    than that that exists in any disk.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  19. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Peter wrote:
    >>Interfering with a hard drive platter is not a wise thing to do. HDs
    >>are manufactured in a clean-room environment and if opened and
    >>reassembled by an end user the drive will not function. Tiny
    >>microscopic dust particles [undetectable with the naked eyes] get on
    >>the platters and when the drive spins-up, the platters inside will
    >>disintegrate.
    >
    >
    > Wow! Disintegrate !?! To pieces, dust or just vaporize?
    >
    >
    I think the poster meant "disintegrate" as in "degrade (particularly
    the coating _on_ the platters) to an extent where the data on them, or
    written to them, will never again be readable."

    --
    The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
    minimize spam. Our true address is of the form che...@prodigy.net.
  20. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    modiftek wrote:
    >
    > You are about to endeavor on a monumental task. Before you began
    > thinking about dismantling a hard drive did you do some research as to
    > how those things are manufactured?
    >
    > Interfering with a hard drive platter is not a wise thing to do. HDs
    > are manufactured in a clean-room environment and if opened and
    > reassembled by an end user the drive will not function. Tiny
    > microscopic dust particles [undetectable with the naked eyes] get on
    > the platters and when the drive spins-up, the platters inside will
    > disintegrate.

    I don't know what the hell you've been smoking, but, crikey - that is
    really, really an utter, total load of absolute bollox. What planet are
    you from?


    > The RPM of the platters inside is so great, those tiny particles that
    > found themselves on the platters becomes solid and bombard the inside
    > of the enclosure and cause damage to the platters.


    Sorry - what GALAXY are you from? If there were ever a valid case for
    sectioning someone, here it is.


    > Open a hard drive at your own risk.

    Sheesh - finally, some sense.

    Odie
    --
    Retrodata
    www.retrodata.co.uk
    Globally Local Data Recovery Experts
  21. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "CJT" <abujlehc@prodigy.net> wrote in message news:423DC915.1070409@prodigy.net...
    > Peter wrote:
    > > >Interfering with a hard drive platter is not a wise thing to do. HDs
    > > >are manufactured in a clean-room environment and if opened and
    > > >reassembled by an end user the drive will not function. Tiny
    > > >microscopic dust particles [undetectable with the naked eyes] get on
    > > >the platters and when the drive spins-up, the platters inside will
    > > >disintegrate.
    > >
    > >
    > > Wow! Disintegrate !?! To pieces, dust or just vaporize?
    > >
    > >
    > I think the poster meant

    Have a look at modiftek's posting history.
    Modiftek is an Artificial Intelligence.
    It is still in an experimental state.

    > "disintegrate" as in "degrade (particularly the coating _on_ the platters)
    > to an extent where the data on them, or written to them, will never again be
    > readable."
    >
    > --
    > The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
    > minimize spam. Our true address is of the form che...@prodigy.net.
  22. Hello,
    i do dismantle Hard Disk and my 320gb Hard Disk it become 289gb what i do . help me .
    my id is iimranbashir@gmail.com
  23. I have 320 GB drives. The problem is that Microsoft Windows counts drive space differently from the makers of hard drives. My 320 GB units show up in My Computer as 298 GB capacity. That is normal - there is nothing wrong at all.
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