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Separate Partitions for Win XP, Programs, Data

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  • Clean Install
  • Windows XP
  • Storage
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 1, 2005 1:08:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Hello. I'm about to clean install full XP Pro. If I create separate
partitions and drive letters for Windows, Programs and Data, will it
all work? Can there be a problem with programs or the OS trying to go
to the wrong drive?

More about : separate partitions win programs data

Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 1, 2005 2:17:45 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

jmarsh1000@hotmail.com wrote:
> Hello. I'm about to clean install full XP Pro. If I create separate
> partitions and drive letters for Windows, Programs and Data, will it
> all work? Can there be a problem with programs or the OS trying to go
> to the wrong drive?
>
>
Should work fine, BUT
I would recommend putting OS and programs on your boot partition C:
If you have to wipe the OS partition in the future, you would have to
reload program files anyway.

I usually just do two partitions, C: for OS and programs
and D: for data.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 1, 2005 4:59:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Many thanks guys. You saved my bacon! The current OS is due to expire
in a few hours' time... the man with a page full of numbers was no
good. Lesson learned.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 2, 2005 9:21:21 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<jmarsh1000@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1109700501.746351.316850@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> I'm about to clean install full XP Pro. If I create separate partitions
> and drive letters for Windows, Programs and Data, will it all work?

Usually. The main risk you take is with the free
stuff that might not have been tested that much
with the programs not in the same partition as Win.

There isnt really any point in separating Win and
programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
you normally need to reinstall the programs too.

The main exception is if you regularly image the win partition
before installing anything, so you can recover easily if it all
goes pear shaped, the win partition will be significantly smaller
and so faster to image and that may encourage you to do it
before even the most trivial install. BUT its better to image both
the Win and programs for the best recovery if it goes pear shaped.

> Can there be a problem with programs
> or the OS trying to go to the wrong drive?

Only with programs that havent been properly tested. Should be rare.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 2, 2005 1:25:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 06:21:21 +1100, "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>There isnt really any point in separating Win and
>programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
>you normally need to reinstall the programs too.

The main exception I find to this is if you're an avid gamer and you
do image backups, in which case it's good to put your games on their
own partition. This avoids needing to backup many gigs of games with
your Win/apps partition, which can really speed things up. I have
separate partitions for Win/apps, games, and data, and don't bother
backing up the games.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 2, 2005 3:41:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> Hello. I'm about to clean install full XP Pro. If I create separate
> partitions and drive letters for Windows, Programs and Data, will it
> all work? Can there be a problem with programs or the OS trying to go
> to the wrong drive?

If the program lets you install on anything besides C: let it. But when its installing look to see if
any parts are being installed on C:. If so, you might as well install the whole thing on C:. That way
when you re-install your OS you know which programs are and aren't going to work. It may look like its
installing fine on D: meanwhle may be puttin some files in the registry so if you re-install the OS those
files will be wiped and the program won't work without a re-install. If you're moving large files like
media, try not to have more than one partition since moving those files will take much longer between
partitions. Using C for the OS, D for everything else, and a removeable E drive (or you could use
optical media if the files are small enough) for a backup would complete the picture. Though I guess
with the larger email allotments available these days and better compression utilities coupled with high
speed connections, more and more people are encryptying and backing up files on to their web based email
accounts.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 2, 2005 3:56:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> And modern incremental image backup will minimise the volume too.

Does incremental mean you are only backing up files that have been changed since the last backup? Or
does it mean you are doing complete backups of everything in a specific area at preset times and keeping
them on file so you can go "backwards in time" in case the last backup has the same problems you
presently have?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 3, 2005 9:45:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Frank W <reply_to_newsgroup@please.ccom> wrote
in message news:38mgisF5q1jahU1@individual.net...

>> And modern incremental image backup will minimise the volume too.

> Does incremental mean you are only backing up
> files that have been changed since the last backup?

Yep.

> Or does it mean you are doing complete backups of everything in a specific
> area at preset times and keeping them on file so you can go "backwards in
> time" in case the last backup has the same problems you presently have?

Nope.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 4, 2005 12:51:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> >>>> There isnt really any point in separating Win and
> >>>> programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
> >>>> you normally need to reinstall the programs too.
>
> >>> The main exception I find to this is if you're an avid gamer and you
> >>> do image backups, in which case it's good to put your games on
> >>> their own partition. This avoids needing to backup many gigs of
> >>> games with your Win/apps partition, which can really speed things up.
> >>
> >>There isnt really any point in separating Win and
> >>programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
> >>you normally need to reinstall the programs too.
> >>
Shouldn't the backup software know (from your previous input) what its supposed to backup? If you have
told it to ignore the games, its not going to backup the games or anything else deemed unnecessary.
Isn't putting less important files on a seperate partition just admitting that you're not using smart
enough backup software? Or not using its selectable options?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 4, 2005 12:55:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Fri, 4 Mar 2005 09:51:02 -0600, "Frank W."
<reply_to_newsgroup@please.ccom> wrote:

>> >>>> There isnt really any point in separating Win and
>> >>>> programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
>> >>>> you normally need to reinstall the programs too.
>>
>> >>> The main exception I find to this is if you're an avid gamer and you
>> >>> do image backups, in which case it's good to put your games on
>> >>> their own partition. This avoids needing to backup many gigs of
>> >>> games with your Win/apps partition, which can really speed things up.
>> >>
>> >>There isnt really any point in separating Win and
>> >>programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
>> >>you normally need to reinstall the programs too.
>> >>
>Shouldn't the backup software know (from your previous input) what its supposed to backup? If you have
>told it to ignore the games, its not going to backup the games or anything else deemed unnecessary.
>Isn't putting less important files on a seperate partition just admitting that you're not using smart
>enough backup software? Or not using its selectable options?

Here's my approach.

If you're using imaging software (which I prefer, due to ease of total
disk fail recovery), it backs up everything on the drive, though some
programs will ignore the swap file and such.

I don't really want my software deciding what to backup or not. Some
people want to backup their games, savefiles, team stats, video rips,
whatever.

By keeping a separate games partition (I also keep an archive
partition with videos, downloaded updates, and other stuff I don't
really need to back up daily or weekly), I can decide which
high-volume apps are low priority for me, in terms of time and space.
For me, it's games I ignore, and I'm able to back up and recover my OS
and critical (to me) apps in 1/4 the time it would take if I backed up
the games as well. Other people will have other priorities.

Yes, it requires a bit of extra management, and if you have enough HD
space and dead time, it's no big deal to dump everything.

There are backup programs that let you choose what to back up, and
some people like those, but I've had problems with critical bits being
in places you don't expect it to be, so I get the whole shebang.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 4, 2005 7:17:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> >> >>>> There isnt really any point in separating Win and
> >> >>>> programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
> >> >>>> you normally need to reinstall the programs too.
> >>
> >> >>> The main exception I find to this is if you're an avid gamer and you
> >> >>> do image backups, in which case it's good to put your games on
> >> >>> their own partition. This avoids needing to backup many gigs of
> >> >>> games with your Win/apps partition, which can really speed things up.
> >> >>
> >> >>There isnt really any point in separating Win and
> >> >>programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
> >> >>you normally need to reinstall the programs too.
> >> >>
> >Shouldn't the backup software know (from your previous input) what its supposed to backup? If you
have
> >told it to ignore the games, its not going to backup the games or anything else deemed unnecessary.
> >Isn't putting less important files on a seperate partition just admitting that you're not using smart
> >enough backup software? Or not using its selectable options?
> I don't really want my software deciding what to backup or not. Some
> people want to backup their games, savefiles, team stats, video rips,
> whatever.
>
> There are backup programs that let you choose what to back up, and
> some people like those, but I've had problems with critical bits being
> in places you don't expect it to be, so I get the whole shebang.

If one just puts the critical bits in one area, its no problem. Or puts the non-critical bits in one
area. Then you just backup "around" that area. That's the least on my problems. I just want the
software to remember and only backup changed files. Microsoft Backup didn't work at all for me. When I
restored some files that it had supposedly backed up, it was the original files, not the updated ones.
How can software make such a simple error? Microsoft Backup looks well laid out. Too bad it didn't
work - or worked with errors which is the same. Unless I did something wrong. But it seemed very simple
to set up.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 5, 2005 6:06:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Hello again,

Thanks for all the input. I think I've started something here! New,
LEGAL Win XP went in on 2 March; drive C is for OS & programs; D is for
My Documents, Pictures, Music. C currently has 12.5GB free, with most
of the stuff we'll use already on it. (Original size=15GB). D has 9.7GB
free. (Original size=10GB). Unformatted=11.87GB.

Is it possible to just copy files, not entire partitions, to the empty
space after it's been formatted? I also want to copy C and D onto
DVDs. Any tips re. reliable, easy-to-use software to do these 2 things?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 5, 2005 6:18:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

C original size 16GB.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 5, 2005 11:22:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

jmarsh1000@hotmail.com wrote:
> Hello. I'm about to clean install full XP Pro. If I create separate
> partitions and drive letters for Windows, Programs and Data, will it
> all work? Can there be a problem with programs or the OS trying to go
> to the wrong drive?

Data transfer rate of your Hard Drive will be slightly slow if you use
different partitions for OS and Programs as the head has to do a
butterfly stroke to access the 2nd partition every time you load a
program. Whereas if they were in the same partition it will be a random
or even linear if you defragment your hard drive often. This is because
seek time of full/butterfly stroke is much higher for most drives
compared to random cylinder access. A typical hard drive should have
about 2-3 gigs of OS+Programs. So if you defragment it after
installation you will get data transfer rate of almost linear cylinder
access time of your hard drive.

Otherwise it should work fine as far as functionality is concerned.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 5, 2005 11:31:30 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Frank W <reply_to_newsgroup@please.ccom> wrote
in message news:38ref0F5ih47jU1@individual.net...

>>>>>> There isnt really any point in separating Win and
>>>>>> programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
>>>>>> you normally need to reinstall the programs too.

>>>>> The main exception I find to this is if you're an avid gamer and you
>>>>> do image backups, in which case it's good to put your games on
>>>>> their own partition. This avoids needing to backup many gigs of
>>>>> games with your Win/apps partition, which can really speed things up.

>>>> There isnt really any point in separating Win and
>>>> programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
>>>> you normally need to reinstall the programs too.

> Shouldn't the backup software know (from your
> previous input) what its supposed to backup? If
> you have told it to ignore the games, its not going to
> backup the games or anything else deemed unnecessary.

Thats an entirely separate issue to what happens when say
the hard drive dies, you restore the OS partition, but not the
games partition since it wasnt backed up at all, and then
try reinstalling the games with the fragments of the original
installs still in the registry in the OS partition. Sometimes
that works fine, sometimes it doesnt, basically that depends
on how the games install and what the install does about
cleaning up old registry entrys for that particular game.

Some programs get completely confused by the registry
entrys for the program in the registry and refuse to install
because they decide that the program is already installed.
And you cant uninstall, because you cant restore the program
from the backup, because you didnt include it in the backup.

> Isn't putting less important files on a seperate partition just
> admitting that you're not using smart enough backup software?

Yes, but that is inevitable if you are using an imaging program
for your backup, it has no smarts other than allowing you to
specify which partitions you want imaged, not at the program level.

> Or not using its selectable options?

Imaging programs have few of those, mostly just the compression level.
March 5, 2005 11:31:31 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> Thats an entirely separate issue to what happens when say
> the hard drive dies, you restore the OS partition, but not the
> games partition since it wasnt backed up at all, and then
> try reinstalling the games with the fragments of the original
> installs still in the registry in the OS partition. Sometimes
> that works fine, sometimes it doesnt, basically that depends
> on how the games install and what the install does about
> cleaning up old registry entrys for that particular game.
>
> Some programs get completely confused by the registry
> entrys for the program in the registry and refuse to install
> because they decide that the program is already installed.
> And you cant uninstall, because you cant restore the program
> from the backup, because you didnt include it in the backup.

For those programs you can remove the relevant registry entries manually
first, then install.

> > Isn't putting less important files on a seperate partition just
> > admitting that you're not using smart enough backup software?
>
> Yes, but that is inevitable if you are using an imaging program
> for your backup, it has no smarts other than allowing you to
> specify which partitions you want imaged, not at the program level.
>
> > Or not using its selectable options?
>
> Imaging programs have few of those, mostly just the compression level.
>

Some imaging software (GHOST) allow to skip specified directories during
image save and restore.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 5, 2005 1:02:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Frank W." <reply_to_newsgroup@please.ccom> wrote in message
news:38s58mF5p6hejU1@individual.net...
>> >> >>>> There isnt really any point in separating Win and
>> >> >>>> programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
>> >> >>>> you normally need to reinstall the programs too.
>> >>
>> >> >>> The main exception I find to this is if you're an avid gamer and you
>> >> >>> do image backups, in which case it's good to put your games on
>> >> >>> their own partition. This avoids needing to backup many gigs of
>> >> >>> games with your Win/apps partition, which can really speed things up.
>> >> >>
>> >> >>There isnt really any point in separating Win and
>> >> >>programs tho, because if you need to reinstall Win,
>> >> >>you normally need to reinstall the programs too.
>> >> >>
>> >Shouldn't the backup software know (from your previous input) what its
>> >supposed to backup? If you
> have
>> >told it to ignore the games, its not going to backup the games or anything
>> >else deemed unnecessary.
>> >Isn't putting less important files on a seperate partition just admitting
>> >that you're not using smart
>> >enough backup software? Or not using its selectable options?
>> I don't really want my software deciding what to backup or not. Some
>> people want to backup their games, savefiles, team stats, video rips,
>> whatever.
>>
>> There are backup programs that let you choose what to back up, and
>> some people like those, but I've had problems with critical bits being
>> in places you don't expect it to be, so I get the whole shebang.

> If one just puts the critical bits in one area, its no problem.

Thats a lot easier said than done.

And the last thing you need is to think you have done that, need to
do a restore after a hard drive failure, and discover that what you
thought was all the critical bits was not in fact all the critical bits at all.

There's a surprising number of odd bits like
digital certificates etc that are easy to overlook.

> Or puts the non-critical bits in one area.
> Then you just backup "around" that area.

See above.

> That's the least on my problems. I just want the
> software to remember and only backup changed
> files. Microsoft Backup didn't work at all for me.

Thats likely something you stuffed up since it does handle that.

> When I restored some files that it had supposedly
> backed up, it was the original files, not the updated ones.

Likely you restored from the wrong backup files.

> How can software make such a simple error?

It wasnt the software, it was you.

> Microsoft Backup looks well laid out. Too bad it didn't work - or
> worked with errors which is the same. Unless I did something wrong.

Thats what happened.

> But it seemed very simple to set up.

Yes, but most likely the problem was with which
backup files you restored from, not the setup at all.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 5, 2005 1:03:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Peter <peterfoxghost@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:38s3b4F5re29qU1@individual.net...

>> Thats an entirely separate issue to what happens when say
>> the hard drive dies, you restore the OS partition, but not the
>> games partition since it wasnt backed up at all, and then
>> try reinstalling the games with the fragments of the original
>> installs still in the registry in the OS partition. Sometimes
>> that works fine, sometimes it doesnt, basically that depends
>> on how the games install and what the install does about
>> cleaning up old registry entrys for that particular game.

>> Some programs get completely confused by the registry
>> entrys for the program in the registry and refuse to install
>> because they decide that the program is already installed.
>> And you cant uninstall, because you cant restore the program
>> from the backup, because you didnt include it in the backup.

> For those programs you can remove the
> relevant registry entries manually first, then install.

That isnt always easy to do and is dangerous
if you dont know what you are doing.

>>> Isn't putting less important files on a seperate partition just
>>> admitting that you're not using smart enough backup software?

>> Yes, but that is inevitable if you are using an imaging program
>> for your backup, it has no smarts other than allowing you to
>> specify which partitions you want imaged, not at the program level.

>>> Or not using its selectable options?

>> Imaging programs have few of those, mostly just the compression level.

> Some imaging software (GHOST) allow to skip
> specified directories during image save and restore.

Nope, not with the standard user interface.
March 5, 2005 3:02:45 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> Data transfer rate of your Hard Drive will be slightly slow if you use
> different partitions for OS and Programs as the head has to do a
> butterfly stroke to access the 2nd partition every time you load a
> program. Whereas if they were in the same partition it will be a random
> or even linear if you defragment your hard drive often. This is because
> seek time of full/butterfly stroke is much higher for most drives
> compared to random cylinder access. A typical hard drive should have
> about 2-3 gigs of OS+Programs. So if you defragment it after
> installation you will get data transfer rate of almost linear cylinder
> access time of your hard drive.
>
> Otherwise it should work fine as far as functionality is concerned.

That is only true if OS and Programs disk partitions are located at the
distant areas of the same hard disk and there are no other busy partitions.
In most cases I would not see much of the "full/butterfly" problem if an
80GB disk would be partitioned 5% OS, 10% Programs and 85% Data. But is
still better to partition it 15% OS+Programs and 85% Data for other reasons
that has been discussed in this thread.
By the way, what do you mean by "data transfer rate of almost linear
cylinder access time" ?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 5, 2005 3:16:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> > That's the least on my problems. I just want the
> > software to remember and only backup changed
> > files. Microsoft Backup didn't work at all for me.
>
> Thats likely something you messed up since it does handle that.
>
> > When I restored some files that it had supposedly
> > backed up, it was the original files, not the updated ones.
>
> Likely you restored from the wrong backup files.

I can't seem to find out where the Restore files are restored? I
asked it not to replace original files - so where do they get put?
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 6, 2005 10:17:29 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Frank W." <reply_to_newsgroup@please.ccom> wrote in message
news:38ubcgF5s0lfuU1@individual.net...
>> > That's the least on my problems. I just want the
>> > software to remember and only backup changed
>> > files. Microsoft Backup didn't work at all for me.
>>
>> Thats likely something you messed up since it does handle that.
>>
>> > When I restored some files that it had supposedly
>> > backed up, it was the original files, not the updated ones.
>>
>> Likely you restored from the wrong backup files.
>
> I can't seem to find out where the Restore files are restored? I
> asked it not to replace original files - so where do they get put?

I've lost track of what version of MS Backup and OS you are using.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 6, 2005 10:17:30 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> >> > That's the least on my problems. I just want the
> >> > software to remember and only backup changed
> >> > files. Microsoft Backup didn't work at all for me.
> >>
> >> Thats likely something you messed up since it does handle that.
> >>
> >> > When I restored some files that it had supposedly
> >> > backed up, it was the original files, not the updated ones.
> >>
> >> Likely you restored from the wrong backup files.
> >
> > I can't seem to find out where the Restore files are restored? I
> > asked it not to replace original files - so where do they get put?
>
> I've lost track of what version of MS Backup and OS you are using.
>
:)  sorry...Win2k w. latest updates.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 6, 2005 10:21:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

<jmarsh1000@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1110020811.032159.103310@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...

> Thanks for all the input. I think I've started something here!

The death squad has its orders, you'll be soorree.... |-)

> New, LEGAL Win XP went in on 2 March; drive C is for OS & programs;
> D is for My Documents, Pictures, Music. C currently has 12.5GB free,
> with most of the stuff we'll use already on it. (Original size=15GB).
> D has 9.7GB free. (Original size=10GB). Unformatted=11.87GB.

> Is it possible to just copy files, not entire partitions,
> to the empty space after it's been formatted?

Yes with My Documents, Pictures, Music

No with the Program Files and Windows trees particularly.

> I also want to copy C and D onto DVDs. Any tips re.
> reliable, easy-to-use software to do these 2 things?

Ghost and True Image are pretty decent. Ghost 9 is a
bit more bulletproof, particularly with unusual hardware.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 6, 2005 10:26:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Tanmoy <datarecovery@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:1110039734.019933.21750@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> jmarsh1000@hotmail.com wrote

>> Hello. I'm about to clean install full XP Pro. If I create
>> separate partitions and drive letters for Windows, Programs
>> and Data, will it all work? Can there be a problem with
>> programs or the OS trying to go to the wrong drive?

> Data transfer rate of your Hard Drive will be slightly
> slow if you use different partitions for OS and Programs
> as the head has to do a butterfly stroke to access the
> 2nd partition every time you load a program.

Nope, not necessarily.

Its certainly true tho that separate partitions for OS and
programs can prevent XP doing some of its location
optimisation that it does with them both in the same partition.

> Whereas if they were in the same partition it will be a random
> or even linear if you defragment your hard drive often.

No need with OS and programs which dont move around much.

> This is because seek time of full/butterfly stroke is much higher
> for most drives compared to random cylinder access. A typical
> hard drive should have about 2-3 gigs of OS+Programs.

Not very typical at all.

> So if you defragment it after installation you will get data transfer
> rate of almost linear cylinder access time of your hard drive.

> Otherwise it should work fine as far as functionality is concerned.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 6, 2005 2:30:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Frank W." <reply_to_newsgroup@please.ccom> wrote in message
news:38uvcfF5ql7a3U1@individual.net...
>> >> > That's the least on my problems. I just want the
>> >> > software to remember and only backup changed
>> >> > files. Microsoft Backup didn't work at all for me.
>> >>
>> >> Thats likely something you messed up since it does handle that.
>> >>
>> >> > When I restored some files that it had supposedly
>> >> > backed up, it was the original files, not the updated ones.
>> >>
>> >> Likely you restored from the wrong backup files.
>> >
>> > I can't seem to find out where the Restore files are restored? I
>> > asked it not to replace original files - so where do they get put?
>>
>> I've lost track of what version of MS Backup and OS you are using.
>>
> :)  sorry...Win2k w. latest updates.

Sorry, dont run it anymore. Moved on to XP now.
!