Flash drives at high altitude

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Hi group,

I happened to notice that the "Kingston 512MB
DataTraveler Hi-speed USB2.0" Has a note of
"maximum altitude when operated" of 6000 mtrs,
abt 20 000 ft. Why is that?

I have seen somewhere that a HD should not be operated
above certain altitudes, and have come to believe that
that is because of the need to build up an air cushion
for the drives head to fly on. But with a flash drive?

What is the story inside an airplane? Crew and
passengers are not subjected to the full loss
of air pressure at altitide, but I am not sure if
that is all there is to it.


Lars
Stockholm
http://web.telia.com/~u84406120/
10 answers Last reply
More about flash drives high altitude
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    In article <l0j49191k9jilpk4rpcju0ms6m409tqp2c@4ax.com>,
    <Lars@fake.com> wrote:
    >Hi group,
    >
    >I happened to notice that the "Kingston 512MB
    >DataTraveler Hi-speed USB2.0" Has a note of
    >"maximum altitude when operated" of 6000 mtrs,
    >abt 20 000 ft. Why is that?
    >
    >I have seen somewhere that a HD should not be operated
    >above certain altitudes, and have come to believe that
    >that is because of the need to build up an air cushion
    >for the drives head to fly on. But with a flash drive?
    >
    >What is the story inside an airplane? Crew and
    >passengers are not subjected to the full loss
    >of air pressure at altitide, but I am not sure if
    >that is all there is to it.
    >
    >
    >Lars
    >Stockholm
    >http://web.telia.com/~u84406120/


    One effect of high altitute is less effective cooling but I can't
    believe that a flash drive needs much cooling.

    Aircraft used for commercial passanger flight are presurized equal
    8,000 ft altitude or something like that.

    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    In article <l0j49191k9jilpk4rpcju0ms6m409tqp2c@4ax.com>,
    <Lars@fake.com> wrote:
    :
    :I happened to notice that the "Kingston 512MB
    :DataTraveler Hi-speed USB2.0" Has a note of
    :"maximum altitude when operated" of 6000 mtrs,
    :abt 20 000 ft. Why is that?
    :
    :I have seen somewhere that a HD should not be operated
    :above certain altitudes, and have come to believe that
    :that is because of the need to build up an air cushion
    :for the drives head to fly on. But with a flash drive?

    Above that altitude the density of the air is too low to provide
    sufficient cooling. Even for a hard disk, cooling at high altitude
    becomes an issue long before the heads lose their air cushion.

    --
    Bob Nichols AT comcast.net I am "rnichols42"
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    <Lars@fake.com> wrote in message
    news:l0j49191k9jilpk4rpcju0ms6m409tqp2c@4ax.com...

    > I happened to notice that the "Kingston 512MB DataTraveler
    > Hi-speed USB2.0" Has a note of "maximum altitude when
    > operated" of 6000 mtrs, abt 20 000 ft. Why is that?

    Dunno. Certainly looks odd. And why only 'when operated' ?

    Looks like someone at Kingston might have had a brain fart.

    > I have seen somewhere that a HD should not be operated
    > above certain altitudes, and have come to believe that
    > that is because of the need to build up an air cushion
    > for the drives head to fly on. But with a flash drive?

    > What is the story inside an airplane? Crew and passengers
    > are not subjected to the full loss of air pressure at altitide,

    Correct.

    > but I am not sure if that is all there is to it.

    The cargo isnt necessarily pressurised.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    In article <3ff2abF7es6iU1@individual.net>,
    Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    ><Lars@fake.com> wrote in message
    >news:l0j49191k9jilpk4rpcju0ms6m409tqp2c@4ax.com...
    >
    >> I happened to notice that the "Kingston 512MB DataTraveler
    >> Hi-speed USB2.0" Has a note of "maximum altitude when
    >> operated" of 6000 mtrs, abt 20 000 ft. Why is that?
    >
    >Dunno. Certainly looks odd. And why only 'when operated' ?
    >
    >Looks like someone at Kingston might have had a brain fart.
    >
    >> I have seen somewhere that a HD should not be operated
    >> above certain altitudes, and have come to believe that
    >> that is because of the need to build up an air cushion
    >> for the drives head to fly on. But with a flash drive?
    >
    >> What is the story inside an airplane? Crew and passengers
    >> are not subjected to the full loss of air pressure at altitide,
    >
    >Correct.
    >
    >> but I am not sure if that is all there is to it.
    >
    >The cargo isnt necessarily pressurised.
    >
    >


    But your thumb drive is probably not being used while it's in cargo.


    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On Mon, 23 May 2005 23:35:37 +0200, Lars@fake.com wrote:

    >Hi group,
    >
    >I happened to notice that the "Kingston 512MB
    >DataTraveler Hi-speed USB2.0" Has a note of
    >"maximum altitude when operated" of 6000 mtrs,
    >abt 20 000 ft. Why is that?
    >
    >I have seen somewhere that a HD should not be operated
    >above certain altitudes, and have come to believe that
    >that is because of the need to build up an air cushion
    >for the drives head to fly on. But with a flash drive?
    >
    >What is the story inside an airplane? Crew and
    >passengers are not subjected to the full loss
    >of air pressure at altitide, but I am not sure if
    >that is all there is to it.

    This is not necessarily true. I have flown to 27,600 feet in an un
    pressured glider using oxygen. Glider pilots often fly at high
    altitudes in un pressurized aircraft. They also are known to use
    laptop computer. Some times in a two seat glider, in races, the pilot
    in the front will do most of the flying while the pilot in the back
    figures out strategy in the back on a laptop computer. GPS data can
    be linked directly to the laptop.
    >
    >
    >Lars
    >Stockholm
    >http://web.telia.com/~u84406120/
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
    news:d6tovj$cce$1@panix5.panix.com...
    > In article <3ff2abF7es6iU1@individual.net>,
    > Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>
    >><Lars@fake.com> wrote in message
    >>news:l0j49191k9jilpk4rpcju0ms6m409tqp2c@4ax.com...
    >>
    >>> I happened to notice that the "Kingston 512MB DataTraveler
    >>> Hi-speed USB2.0" Has a note of "maximum altitude when
    >>> operated" of 6000 mtrs, abt 20 000 ft. Why is that?
    >>
    >>Dunno. Certainly looks odd. And why only 'when operated' ?
    >>
    >>Looks like someone at Kingston might have had a brain fart.
    >>
    >>> I have seen somewhere that a HD should not be operated
    >>> above certain altitudes, and have come to believe that
    >>> that is because of the need to build up an air cushion
    >>> for the drives head to fly on. But with a flash drive?
    >>
    >>> What is the story inside an airplane? Crew and passengers
    >>> are not subjected to the full loss of air pressure at altitide,
    >>
    >>Correct.
    >>
    >>> but I am not sure if that is all there is to it.
    >>
    >>The cargo isnt necessarily pressurised.

    > But your thumb drive is probably not being used while it's in cargo.

    Corse.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Lars@fake.com wrote:

    > Hi group,
    >
    > I happened to notice that the "Kingston 512MB
    > DataTraveler Hi-speed USB2.0" Has a note of
    > "maximum altitude when operated" of 6000 mtrs,
    > abt 20 000 ft. Why is that?

    Acrophobia, what else? ;)
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Zvi Netiv <support@replace_with_domain.com> wrote in message
    news:scp59192lo0s4ggcjgq3q4tolkmh35qrad@4ax.com...
    > Lars@fake.com wrote

    >> I happened to notice that the "Kingston 512MB
    >> DataTraveler Hi-speed USB2.0" Has a note of
    >> "maximum altitude when operated" of 6000 mtrs,
    >> abt 20 000 ft. Why is that?

    > Acrophobia, what else? ;)

    What has fear of greek temples got to do with anything ?
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    ChangeGuy <change.this@change.that> wrote in
    message news:2o-dncHFLLUj_g7fRVn-hg@rogers.com...

    > Speaking of flash drives, how reliable are these things?

    Like anything electronic, they can die.

    > I mean how long can data last on them (without being overwritten?).

    Long enough basically.

    > Do they die often?

    How long is a piece of string. Often enough to be a problem basically.

    > I've seen a 4gig usb flash drive I can afford but it's no good if it won't
    > last a couple of years.

    Plenty do, but not all of them.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Rod Speed wrote:
    > Zvi Netiv <support@replace_with_domain.com> wrote in message
    > news:scp59192lo0s4ggcjgq3q4tolkmh35qrad@4ax.com...

    > > Acrophobia, what else? ;)
    >
    > What has fear of greek temples got to do with anything ?

    I thought it was fear of circus performers and pole dancers. I've been
    treating myself for the latter by frequently visiting strip clubs.
Ask a new question

Read More

Storage