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Cannot access other computer!

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September 2, 2004 3:57:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless,microsoft.public.windowsxp.network_web (More info?)

My question involves a wireless network, but since the question might also
apply to networks in general, I am posting it to the general network NG as
well.

I have two laptops, each with a PC card wireless card. I have successfully
(I think) created an ad hoc wireless connection between them. They both have
the same SSID, the "Wireless Network Connection" icon shows that they are
connected with excellent signal strength, etc. There is no WEP enabled, no
security.

I set up "Internet Connection Sharing", although I will not actually use
that, in case it is necessary. (I only have a dial-up connection, each
laptop has its built-in modem, there is no reason I would want to connect
one through the other's connection.)

What I do wish to be able to do is to transfer files between the two
computers wirelessly. I cannot seem to be able to get that to work.

Both computers run Windows XP Pro. One has been updated to SP2, the other is
running SP1, with all the latest patches other than SP2. I have Windows
Firewall turned off (while trying to set this up) on the SP computer, and
the anti-virus programs turned off on both.

On the root drives of both computers, file-sharing is enabled. Simple file
sharing is enabled on both computers.

When I open up "My Network Places" on either computer, I only see that
computer on it, not the other computer. If I click "Entire Network", then
"Microsoft Windows Network", then "Workgroup", on one of the computers I
still only see that same computer, not the other one. When I do that on the
other one, after clicking "Workgroup", I get an error message: "Workgroup is
not accessible.......The list of servers for this workgroup is not currently
available".

If I click on "Map Network Drives", I cannot see the other computer's drive
to be mapped, from either computer.

I have searched the web a lot to try to find a solution for this, the
Microsoft Knowledge Base, etc., tried different things, nothing has worked.

I would greatly appreciate it if someone here could help with this problem.
Thank you.

More about : access computer

September 2, 2004 6:39:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless,microsoft.public.windowsxp.network_web (More info?)

On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 11:57:17 -0700, " MS" <ms@nospam.com> wrote:

>My question involves a wireless network, but since the question might also
>apply to networks in general, I am posting it to the general network NG as
>well.
>
>I have two laptops, each with a PC card wireless card. I have successfully
>(I think) created an ad hoc wireless connection between them. They both have
>the same SSID, the "Wireless Network Connection" icon shows that they are
>connected with excellent signal strength, etc. There is no WEP enabled, no
>security.
>
>I set up "Internet Connection Sharing", although I will not actually use
>that, in case it is necessary. (I only have a dial-up connection, each
>laptop has its built-in modem, there is no reason I would want to connect
>one through the other's connection.)
>
>What I do wish to be able to do is to transfer files between the two
>computers wirelessly. I cannot seem to be able to get that to work.
>
>Both computers run Windows XP Pro. One has been updated to SP2, the other is
>running SP1, with all the latest patches other than SP2. I have Windows
>Firewall turned off (while trying to set this up) on the SP computer, and
>the anti-virus programs turned off on both.
>
>On the root drives of both computers, file-sharing is enabled. Simple file
>sharing is enabled on both computers.
>
>When I open up "My Network Places" on either computer, I only see that
>computer on it, not the other computer. If I click "Entire Network", then
>"Microsoft Windows Network", then "Workgroup", on one of the computers I
>still only see that same computer, not the other one. When I do that on the
>other one, after clicking "Workgroup", I get an error message: "Workgroup is
>not accessible.......The list of servers for this workgroup is not currently
>available".
>
>If I click on "Map Network Drives", I cannot see the other computer's drive
>to be mapped, from either computer.
>
>I have searched the web a lot to try to find a solution for this, the
>Microsoft Knowledge Base, etc., tried different things, nothing has worked.
>
>I would greatly appreciate it if someone here could help with this problem.
>Thank you.

Start by verifying that you do have connectivity between the two. Can you ping
each from the other? By name and by ip address? If not, exactly what error
(provide text please) do you get when pinging?

Many wireless cards report "excellent signal strength" when the total "signal"
includes a lot of noise. Have you tried other channels on the wireless cards?
What security features are enabled?

Are you running both Client for Microsoft Networks, and File and Printer Sharing
for Microsoft Networks (Local Area Connection - Properties), on each computer?
Do you have shares setup on each?

Are you running NetBIOS Over TCP/IP (Local Area Connection - Properties - TCP/IP
- Properties - Advanced - WINS) on each computer?

Make sure the browser service is running on each computer. Control Panel -
Administrative Tools - Services. Verify that the Computer Browser service is
started.

If, in fact, you have connectivity (successful pings), and all necessary
protocols and services, how about shares visibility? From each computer (use
actual name / address of each computer as appropriate):
Start - Run then:
1) \\ThisComputerByName
2) \\ThisComputerByIPAddress
3) \\OtherComputerByName
4) \\OtherComputerByIPAddress
Report visibility of shares / exact error displayed in each test (8 tests
total).

Cheers,
Chuck
Paranoia comes from experience - and is not necessarily a bad thing.
September 2, 2004 8:22:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless,microsoft.public.windowsxp.network_web (More info?)

Thank you, Chuck,

Using your checklist, I got it working. I'll explain a little more.

Yes, I was able to successfully ping the other, still when I couldn't see
the other's drive.

Yes, I was running both Client for Microsoft Networks, and File and Printer
Sharing
for Microsoft Networks, as well as several others. (Is there a list
somewhere, of which of these protocols one should have running for basic
networking. Could having protocols one doesn't need running all the time be
a resource drain?)

As mentioned, I did have sharing set up on the root directory (and all
subdirectories) of both drives.

The "Computer Browser" service was running on one, but not the other. I just
checked this now, however, after I already was able to see the shared drive,
so I don't think the fact that one computer didn't have it running caused
the problem, as later the problem was solved, and that computer was still
not running that service (set to manual). I started it now though, and set
it to "Automatic", just in case.

No, I did not have "NetBIOS over TCP/IP" selected. The default selection
there is otherwise. I made the change you suggested. (Curious though, how
most people would know to do that. The default is otherwise, it is in an
obscure place, I didn't see any mention of it in any of my searching of
networking guides on the web, the Microsoft Knowledge Base, etc. If that
setting is necessary to see the files on a connected network computer, how
would most people know to do that? Why is the default setting otherwise?
Anyhow, it worked for me.

Also, in looking at my protocols, I figured (although I really don't know
anything about these protocols), that if "NetBios over TCP/IP" is selected,
that all the protocols with Netbios in the name probably should be selected.
On one of the two computers NWLink NetBIOS was checked, but not "NWLink
IPX/SPX NetBIOS Compatible Transport Protocol". I checked that one also. On
the other computer neither of those two protocols were selected, and I
selected both. I don't know if selecting those protocols had anything to do
with getting the sharing to work, or whether only the change discussed in
the preceding paragraph was necessary. As I discussed further up, which
protocols are necessary for most networking? Of course "Client for Microsoft
Networks", and "File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks", and
"Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)". But how about "Microsoft TCP/IP version 6"? (I
have it selected, but don't understand how it differs or adds to the other
TCP/IP.) How about "QoS Packet Scheduler"? (I have it selected, but haven't
the slightest idea what it is.) And as I mentioned, those two NWLink
protocols, which I just selected due to them having NetBIOS in the name.

Therefore--what made the sharing work on my setup--the change to "NetBIOS
over TCP/IP", as you suggested. Perhaps also the addition of the two NWLink
protocols with NetBIOS in the name, but I really don't know if that had
anything to do with it.

Thanks again for your suggestions, which succeeded when no other guides did.
Furhter clarification would be interesting.


"Chuck" <none@example.net> wrote in message
news:62tej0hak68fkcun6moku2kcivlu38bmve@4ax.com...
> Start by verifying that you do have connectivity between the two. Can you
> ping
> each from the other? By name and by ip address? If not, exactly what
> error
> (provide text please) do you get when pinging?
>
> Many wireless cards report "excellent signal strength" when the total
> "signal"
> includes a lot of noise. Have you tried other channels on the wireless
> cards?
> What security features are enabled?
>
> Are you running both Client for Microsoft Networks, and File and Printer
> Sharing
> for Microsoft Networks (Local Area Connection - Properties), on each
> computer?
> Do you have shares setup on each?
>
> Are you running NetBIOS Over TCP/IP (Local Area Connection - Properties -
> TCP/IP
> - Properties - Advanced - WINS) on each computer?
>
> Make sure the browser service is running on each computer. Control
> Panel -
> Administrative Tools - Services. Verify that the Computer Browser service
> is
> started.
>
> If, in fact, you have connectivity (successful pings), and all necessary
> protocols and services, how about shares visibility? From each computer
> (use
> actual name / address of each computer as appropriate):
> Start - Run then:
> 1) \\ThisComputerByName
> 2) \\ThisComputerByIPAddress
> 3) \\OtherComputerByName
> 4) \\OtherComputerByIPAddress
> Report visibility of shares / exact error displayed in each test (8 tests
> total).
>
> Cheers,
> Chuck
> Paranoia comes from experience - and is not necessarily a bad thing.
Related resources
September 2, 2004 11:13:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless,microsoft.public.windowsxp.network_web (More info?)

On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 16:22:32 -0700, " MS" <ms@nospam.com> wrote:

>Thank you, Chuck,
>
>Using your checklist, I got it working. I'll explain a little more.
>
>Yes, I was able to successfully ping the other, still when I couldn't see
>the other's drive.
>
>Yes, I was running both Client for Microsoft Networks, and File and Printer
>Sharing
>for Microsoft Networks, as well as several others. (Is there a list
>somewhere, of which of these protocols one should have running for basic
>networking. Could having protocols one doesn't need running all the time be
>a resource drain?)
>
>As mentioned, I did have sharing set up on the root directory (and all
>subdirectories) of both drives.
>
>The "Computer Browser" service was running on one, but not the other. I just
>checked this now, however, after I already was able to see the shared drive,
>so I don't think the fact that one computer didn't have it running caused
>the problem, as later the problem was solved, and that computer was still
>not running that service (set to manual). I started it now though, and set
>it to "Automatic", just in case.
>
>No, I did not have "NetBIOS over TCP/IP" selected. The default selection
>there is otherwise. I made the change you suggested. (Curious though, how
>most people would know to do that. The default is otherwise, it is in an
>obscure place, I didn't see any mention of it in any of my searching of
>networking guides on the web, the Microsoft Knowledge Base, etc. If that
>setting is necessary to see the files on a connected network computer, how
>would most people know to do that? Why is the default setting otherwise?
>Anyhow, it worked for me.
>
>Also, in looking at my protocols, I figured (although I really don't know
>anything about these protocols), that if "NetBios over TCP/IP" is selected,
>that all the protocols with Netbios in the name probably should be selected.
>On one of the two computers NWLink NetBIOS was checked, but not "NWLink
>IPX/SPX NetBIOS Compatible Transport Protocol". I checked that one also. On
>the other computer neither of those two protocols were selected, and I
>selected both. I don't know if selecting those protocols had anything to do
>with getting the sharing to work, or whether only the change discussed in
>the preceding paragraph was necessary. As I discussed further up, which
>protocols are necessary for most networking? Of course "Client for Microsoft
>Networks", and "File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks", and
>"Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)". But how about "Microsoft TCP/IP version 6"? (I
>have it selected, but don't understand how it differs or adds to the other
>TCP/IP.) How about "QoS Packet Scheduler"? (I have it selected, but haven't
>the slightest idea what it is.) And as I mentioned, those two NWLink
>protocols, which I just selected due to them having NetBIOS in the name.
>
>Therefore--what made the sharing work on my setup--the change to "NetBIOS
>over TCP/IP", as you suggested. Perhaps also the addition of the two NWLink
>protocols with NetBIOS in the name, but I really don't know if that had
>anything to do with it.
>
>Thanks again for your suggestions, which succeeded when no other guides did.
>Furhter clarification would be interesting.
>
>
>"Chuck" <none@example.net> wrote in message
>news:62tej0hak68fkcun6moku2kcivlu38bmve@4ax.com...
>> Start by verifying that you do have connectivity between the two. Can you
>> ping
>> each from the other? By name and by ip address? If not, exactly what
>> error
>> (provide text please) do you get when pinging?
>>
>> Many wireless cards report "excellent signal strength" when the total
>> "signal"
>> includes a lot of noise. Have you tried other channels on the wireless
>> cards?
>> What security features are enabled?
>>
>> Are you running both Client for Microsoft Networks, and File and Printer
>> Sharing
>> for Microsoft Networks (Local Area Connection - Properties), on each
>> computer?
>> Do you have shares setup on each?
>>
>> Are you running NetBIOS Over TCP/IP (Local Area Connection - Properties -
>> TCP/IP
>> - Properties - Advanced - WINS) on each computer?
>>
>> Make sure the browser service is running on each computer. Control
>> Panel -
>> Administrative Tools - Services. Verify that the Computer Browser service
>> is
>> started.
>>
>> If, in fact, you have connectivity (successful pings), and all necessary
>> protocols and services, how about shares visibility? From each computer
>> (use
>> actual name / address of each computer as appropriate):
>> Start - Run then:
>> 1) \\ThisComputerByName
>> 2) \\ThisComputerByIPAddress
>> 3) \\OtherComputerByName
>> 4) \\OtherComputerByIPAddress
>> Report visibility of shares / exact error displayed in each test (8 tests
>> total).

You make many excellent points. Microsoft provides much documentation
prescribing much of what you've done (not all). But finding the answers to your
problems, in their documentation, is sometimes like looking for a diamond in a
coal mine - with no lights.

Here are three websites with useful tutorials on file sharing, and other issues:
http://www.cablesense.com/
http://www.homenethelp.com/
http://www.practicallynetworked.com/

I, personally, have only the following items in my LAN Properties list:
1) Client for Microsoft Networks (the client in file sharing).
2) File and Printer Sharing For Microsoft Networks (the server in file sharing)
3) QoS Packet Scheduler.
4) Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).
And I have NetBIOS Over TCP/IP enabled under Advanced TCP/IP Settings - WINS.

Here is the download for the Microsoft reference document about file sharing:
<http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyI...;

I DO NOT recommend any other protocols. Specifically not Netbeui nor NWLink
(IPX/SPX). All they do is confuse the issue. If your file sharing is now
working, fine, but the fact is you will be better off doing without either of
those components. You do not need either of those to make file sharing work
properly. And excess protocols / services are indeed a resource drain.

IPV6 is needed if you're going to access net resources that are configured with
IPV6 addresses. And if your network to those resources supports IPV6. But
currently it causes problems with normal IP services, such as file sharing
(NBT). So the general advice is to remove it, when file sharing and general
internet use is important.

You don't even need the Browser service running, to have file sharing work. But
you do, if you are going to start your file sharing from Network Neighborhood.
Here is a good discussion about the Browser subsystem:
<http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winntas/de...;

These forums are one place where you find the answers, when official
documentation fails you. And when you have the answers, this is one place where
you can provide them. Nobody gets paid money to post here - but we all gain
knowledge.

Cheers,
Chuck
Paranoia comes from experience - and is not necessarily a bad thing.
September 3, 2004 1:17:23 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless,microsoft.public.windowsxp.network_web (More info?)

Thanks again, for sharing your knowledge.

"Chuck" <none@example.net> wrote in message
news:92cfj0l4r4qn80ro28mi7rrovt2bc6eife@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 16:22:32 -0700, " MS" <ms@nospam.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Thank you, Chuck,
>>
>>Using your checklist, I got it working. I'll explain a little more.
>>
>>Yes, I was able to successfully ping the other, still when I couldn't see
>>the other's drive.
>>
>>Yes, I was running both Client for Microsoft Networks, and File and
>>Printer
>>Sharing
>>for Microsoft Networks, as well as several others. (Is there a list
>>somewhere, of which of these protocols one should have running for basic
>>networking. Could having protocols one doesn't need running all the time
>>be
>>a resource drain?)
>>
>>As mentioned, I did have sharing set up on the root directory (and all
>>subdirectories) of both drives.
>>
>>The "Computer Browser" service was running on one, but not the other. I
>>just
>>checked this now, however, after I already was able to see the shared
>>drive,
>>so I don't think the fact that one computer didn't have it running caused
>>the problem, as later the problem was solved, and that computer was still
>>not running that service (set to manual). I started it now though, and set
>>it to "Automatic", just in case.
>>
>>No, I did not have "NetBIOS over TCP/IP" selected. The default selection
>>there is otherwise. I made the change you suggested. (Curious though, how
>>most people would know to do that. The default is otherwise, it is in an
>>obscure place, I didn't see any mention of it in any of my searching of
>>networking guides on the web, the Microsoft Knowledge Base, etc. If that
>>setting is necessary to see the files on a connected network computer, how
>>would most people know to do that? Why is the default setting otherwise?
>>Anyhow, it worked for me.
>>
>>Also, in looking at my protocols, I figured (although I really don't know
>>anything about these protocols), that if "NetBios over TCP/IP" is
>>selected,
>>that all the protocols with Netbios in the name probably should be
>>selected.
>>On one of the two computers NWLink NetBIOS was checked, but not "NWLink
>>IPX/SPX NetBIOS Compatible Transport Protocol". I checked that one also.
>>On
>>the other computer neither of those two protocols were selected, and I
>>selected both. I don't know if selecting those protocols had anything to
>>do
>>with getting the sharing to work, or whether only the change discussed in
>>the preceding paragraph was necessary. As I discussed further up, which
>>protocols are necessary for most networking? Of course "Client for
>>Microsoft
>>Networks", and "File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks", and
>>"Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)". But how about "Microsoft TCP/IP version 6"?
>>(I
>>have it selected, but don't understand how it differs or adds to the other
>>TCP/IP.) How about "QoS Packet Scheduler"? (I have it selected, but
>>haven't
>>the slightest idea what it is.) And as I mentioned, those two NWLink
>>protocols, which I just selected due to them having NetBIOS in the name.
>>
>>Therefore--what made the sharing work on my setup--the change to "NetBIOS
>>over TCP/IP", as you suggested. Perhaps also the addition of the two
>>NWLink
>>protocols with NetBIOS in the name, but I really don't know if that had
>>anything to do with it.
>>
>>Thanks again for your suggestions, which succeeded when no other guides
>>did.
>>Furhter clarification would be interesting.
>>
>>
>>"Chuck" <none@example.net> wrote in message
>>news:62tej0hak68fkcun6moku2kcivlu38bmve@4ax.com...
>>> Start by verifying that you do have connectivity between the two. Can
>>> you
>>> ping
>>> each from the other? By name and by ip address? If not, exactly what
>>> error
>>> (provide text please) do you get when pinging?
>>>
>>> Many wireless cards report "excellent signal strength" when the total
>>> "signal"
>>> includes a lot of noise. Have you tried other channels on the wireless
>>> cards?
>>> What security features are enabled?
>>>
>>> Are you running both Client for Microsoft Networks, and File and Printer
>>> Sharing
>>> for Microsoft Networks (Local Area Connection - Properties), on each
>>> computer?
>>> Do you have shares setup on each?
>>>
>>> Are you running NetBIOS Over TCP/IP (Local Area Connection -
>>> Properties -
>>> TCP/IP
>>> - Properties - Advanced - WINS) on each computer?
>>>
>>> Make sure the browser service is running on each computer. Control
>>> Panel -
>>> Administrative Tools - Services. Verify that the Computer Browser
>>> service
>>> is
>>> started.
>>>
>>> If, in fact, you have connectivity (successful pings), and all necessary
>>> protocols and services, how about shares visibility? From each computer
>>> (use
>>> actual name / address of each computer as appropriate):
>>> Start - Run then:
>>> 1) \\ThisComputerByName
>>> 2) \\ThisComputerByIPAddress
>>> 3) \\OtherComputerByName
>>> 4) \\OtherComputerByIPAddress
>>> Report visibility of shares / exact error displayed in each test (8
>>> tests
>>> total).
>
> You make many excellent points. Microsoft provides much documentation
> prescribing much of what you've done (not all). But finding the answers
> to your
> problems, in their documentation, is sometimes like looking for a diamond
> in a
> coal mine - with no lights.
>
> Here are three websites with useful tutorials on file sharing, and other
> issues:
> http://www.cablesense.com/
> http://www.homenethelp.com/
> http://www.practicallynetworked.com/
>
> I, personally, have only the following items in my LAN Properties list:
> 1) Client for Microsoft Networks (the client in file sharing).
> 2) File and Printer Sharing For Microsoft Networks (the server in file
> sharing)
> 3) QoS Packet Scheduler.
> 4) Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).
> And I have NetBIOS Over TCP/IP enabled under Advanced TCP/IP Settings -
> WINS.
>
> Here is the download for the Microsoft reference document about file
> sharing:
> <http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyI...;
>
> I DO NOT recommend any other protocols. Specifically not Netbeui nor
> NWLink
> (IPX/SPX). All they do is confuse the issue. If your file sharing is now
> working, fine, but the fact is you will be better off doing without either
> of
> those components. You do not need either of those to make file sharing
> work
> properly. And excess protocols / services are indeed a resource drain.
>
> IPV6 is needed if you're going to access net resources that are configured
> with
> IPV6 addresses. And if your network to those resources supports IPV6.
> But
> currently it causes problems with normal IP services, such as file sharing
> (NBT). So the general advice is to remove it, when file sharing and
> general
> internet use is important.
>
> You don't even need the Browser service running, to have file sharing
> work. But
> you do, if you are going to start your file sharing from Network
> Neighborhood.
> Here is a good discussion about the Browser subsystem:
> <http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winntas/de...;
>
> These forums are one place where you find the answers, when official
> documentation fails you. And when you have the answers, this is one place
> where
> you can provide them. Nobody gets paid money to post here - but we all
> gain
> knowledge.
>
> Cheers,
> Chuck
> Paranoia comes from experience - and is not necessarily a bad thing.
!