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External Ethernet HD and Mirroing

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Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 18, 2005 6:22:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
mirroring?

My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy) want to set up a fail
safe backup/recovery system.

I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.

Thanks in advance for any help

Gary Starkweather
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 19, 2005 2:28:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"gstark33" <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1119129779.793667.307600@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
> mirroring?
>
> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy) want to set up a fail
> safe backup/recovery system.
>
> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.

Use three or four and rotate one periodically to offsite(in the car etc. for
backup). Consider removable SATA HDs in shock mounted trays like the
KingWin KF83. This way the drives are mechanically external but device wise
internal and thus appear to the system as internal. XP supports mirroring.
June 19, 2005 3:02:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> Use three or four and rotate one periodically to offsite(in the car etc.
for
> backup). Consider removable SATA HDs in shock mounted trays like the
> KingWin KF83. This way the drives are mechanically external but device
wise
> internal and thus appear to the system as internal. XP supports
mirroring.

I think OP was talking about ETHERNET external drives.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 19, 2005 10:56:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:%d1te.335515$cg1.96760@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> Use three or four and rotate one periodically to offsite(in the car etc.
for
> backup). Consider removable SATA HDs in shock mounted trays like the
> KingWin KF83. This way the drives are mechanically external but device
wise
> internal and thus appear to the system as internal. XP supports
mirroring.

I was disappointed to find out that XP does *not* support mirroring. At
least not by itself in software, you need a hardware RAID card to do
mirroring, or follow some instructions on some guys website for hacking XP
to do mirroring.

--Dan
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 1:10:28 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
> mirroring?

Buffalo <http://www.buffalotech.com/products/storage.php&gt; makes some
multiple-drive NAS boxes that do RAID, but they're not exactly
"inexpensive". Consumer NAS boxes contain a single drive and a USB port
for an additional drive, but don't support any kind of RAID. There are
some inexpensive dual-drive enclosures that do striping, but I don't
know if any do mirroring reliably.


> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy) want to set up a fail
> safe backup/recovery system.
>
> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.

Two drives will give you more backup safety for the buck if they're in
separate enclosures (or hot-swap carriers) and kept in separate
locations (or a fire safe). At least one of the two drives used for
backup should not be powered up and mounted all the time. Not as
convenient as a simple NAS mirror, but the minimum for a "fail-safe"
system with two drives.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 3:18:12 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Peter" <peterfoxghost@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:1Ofte.823$X57.21661@news20.bellglobal.com...
> > Use three or four and rotate one periodically to offsite(in the car etc.
> for
> > backup). Consider removable SATA HDs in shock mounted trays like the
> > KingWin KF83. This way the drives are mechanically external but device
> wise
> > internal and thus appear to the system as internal. XP supports
> mirroring.
>
> I think OP was talking about ETHERNET external drives.

YES, the OP did so title the thread. If one reads his post then ethernet
seems to not be relevant. So I answered with the best solution.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 3:18:55 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:6djte.30851$J12.22504@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
>
> "Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
> news:%d1te.335515$cg1.96760@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> > Use three or four and rotate one periodically to offsite(in the car etc.
> for
> > backup). Consider removable SATA HDs in shock mounted trays like the
> > KingWin KF83. This way the drives are mechanically external but device
> wise
> > internal and thus appear to the system as internal. XP supports
> mirroring.
>
> I was disappointed to find out that XP does *not* support mirroring.

You are mistaken:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/window...
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 3:18:56 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:z3nte.338849$cg1.42924@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>
> "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:6djte.30851$J12.22504@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
> >
> > I was disappointed to find out that XP does *not* support mirroring.
>
> You are mistaken:
>
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/window...
ng.mspx
>
Have you actually tried it? Nobody else has reported it can be done.

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/window...
shows other features.
I think they are only available when you use disk manager remotely to Server versions.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 6:30:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:D 955k401aj6@enews3.newsguy.com...
> "Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
> news:z3nte.338849$cg1.42924@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> >
> > "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:6djte.30851$J12.22504@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
> > >
> > > I was disappointed to find out that XP does *not* support mirroring.
> >
> > You are mistaken:
> >
>
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/window...
> ng.mspx
> >
> Have you actually tried it? Nobody else has reported it can be done.

HMM, that's correct. Only RAID 0 in XP is natively supported.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 11:46:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

dg <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:6djte.30851$J12.22504@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
> Ron Reaugh <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote

>> Use three or four and rotate one periodically to offsite(in the car etc.
>> for backup). Consider removable SATA HDs in shock mounted trays
>> like the KingWin KF83. This way the drives are mechanically external
>> but device wise internal and thus appear to the system as internal.
>> XP supports mirroring.

> I was disappointed to find out that XP does *not* support mirroring.

Yes it does, but that does depend on the version.

> At least not by itself in software,

Fraid so.

> you need a hardware RAID card to do mirroring,

Nope, not with the right XP version.

> or follow some instructions on some guys
> website for hacking XP to do mirroring.

Thats just a kludge, using whats in some versions of XP.
June 20, 2005 1:22:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
> mirroring?

No.

> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy) want to set up a fail
> safe backup/recovery system.
>
> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.

How is that going to help?

You need first to answer yourself a few basic questions about
backup/recovery:
1. Where are critical files being located in the first place?
(local hard disk on her PC?)
2. How important is to be able to restore in situations of
house fire/flood, theft or a massive power damage?
3. How much time do you allow for system recovery or data
restore?
4. How much data needs to be protected?
5. Do you need to keep old file versions for restore (in case of
unnoticed data corruption)?

Peter
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 4:13:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Previously gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
> mirroring?

AFAIK no.

> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy) want to set up a fail
> safe backup/recovery system.

> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.

I can understand that very well.

> Thanks in advance for any help

My advice would be to do it yourself with a real computer running
Linux and software-RAID1, i.e. two disks that mirror each other.
Then export the space via NFS (if you use Linux/Unix) or
SAMBA (if you use Windows). For the server best use some older,
reliable hardware, e.g. an older computer you trust. If you buy
new hardware, go for older, reliable stuff, not cutting edge.
Also keep a spare disk handy.

The advantage of this approach is that you know what you get, you
understand the technology and you can repair/upgrade/modify it
yourself. The disadvantage is that it requires some work. I
don't think it will be more expensive.

Arno
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 4:36:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 21:10:28 GMT, neillmassello@earthlink.net (Neill
Massello) wrote:

>gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
>> mirroring?
>
>Buffalo <http://www.buffalotech.com/products/storage.php&gt; makes some
>multiple-drive NAS boxes that do RAID, but they're not exactly
>"inexpensive". Consumer NAS boxes contain a single drive and a USB port
>for an additional drive, but don't support any kind of RAID. There are
>some inexpensive dual-drive enclosures that do striping, but I don't
>know if any do mirroring reliably.

The Buffalotech Linkstation (under $300) doesn't support RAID, but it
will automatically back up to a second drive connected to the USB
port. Users report that this backup is slow and inflexible, with some
bugs in the implementation. I haven't used it myself, though.

Not as real-time as RAID, but it would give you some redundancy for a
relatively reasonable price. Reportedly low noise and low power, as
well.

The affordable home ethernet drive market's not very mature yet. I'm
testing the Iomega version right now (pretty slow, with a few quirks,
and no USB/FW port, but relatively inexpensive). Dunno yet if I'm
going to keep it or not.


--
Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 7:55:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:D 955k401aj6@enews3.newsguy.com...
> "Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message news:z3nte.338849$cg1.42924@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> >
> > "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:6djte.30851$J12.22504@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
> > >
> > > I was disappointed to find out that XP does *not* support mirroring.
> >
> > You are mistaken:
> >
> http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/window...
> ng.mspx

What an fine use of OE-QuoteFix to have it break what isn't really broken in OE.

> >
> Have you actually tried it? Nobody else has reported it can be done.
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/window...
> shows other features.
> I think they are only available when you use disk manager remotely to Server versions.
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 9:06:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:3hm7e2Fhpe9mU1@individual.net...
>> you need a hardware RAID card to do mirroring,
>
> Nope, not with the right XP version.

Which XP version supports software drive mirroring? I have never seen it
done but perhaps I have just been using the wrong version. I use XP Pro.

THANKS!
--Dan
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 20, 2005 10:04:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Arno Wagner" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:3hnq7oFhv1tpU1@individual.net...
> Previously gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
> > mirroring?
>
> AFAIK no.
>
> > My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy) want to set up a fail
> > safe backup/recovery system.
>
> > I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.
>
> I can understand that very well.
>
> > Thanks in advance for any help
>
> My advice would be to do it yourself with a real computer running
> Linux and software-RAID1, i.e. two disks that mirror each other.
> Then export the space via NFS (if you use Linux/Unix) or
> SAMBA (if you use Windows). For the server best use some older,
> reliable hardware, e.g. an older computer you trust. If you buy
> new hardware, go for older, reliable stuff, not cutting edge.
> Also keep a spare disk handy.
>
> The advantage of this approach is that you know what you get, you
> understand the technology and you can repair/upgrade/modify it
> yourself. The disadvantage is that it requires some work. I
> don't think it will be more expensive.

I've rarely seen such a bad set of advice.

The user should simply mirror two drives on a PC and then keep a 3rd[4th] HD
for offsite backup. The 3rd[&4th] should be rotated offsite as a backup.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 8:49:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

dg <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:JICte.380$N22.3@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
> Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote

>>> you need a hardware RAID card to do mirroring,

>> Nope, not with the right XP version.

> Which XP version supports software drive mirroring?

Pretty sure server 2003 does. The MS docs
are a bit vague on that, they certainly say

You can mirror volumes only on computers running Windows 2000 Server,
Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server.

in the XP Pro help.

> I have never seen it done but perhaps I have
just been using the wrong version. I use XP Pro.

Yes, it certainly cant do it.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 8:49:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Watch Roddies extremely honed_to_perfection bullshitting skills in action.

"Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:3hohdbFhk9lkU1@individual.net
> dg <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:JICte.380$N22.3@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
> > Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote
>
> > > > you need a hardware RAID card to do mirroring,
>
> > > *Nope, not with the right XP version*.
>
> > Which *XP version* supports software drive mirroring?
>
> Pretty sure server 2003 does. The MS docs
> are a bit vague on that, they certainly say
>
> You can mirror volumes only on computers running *Windows 2000 Server*,
> *Windows 2000 Advanced Server*, or *Windows 2000 Datacenter Server*.
>
> in the XP Pro help.
>
> > I have never seen it done but perhaps I have
> just been using the wrong version. I use XP Pro.
>
> Yes, it certainly cant do it.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 8:53:40 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Ron Reaugh <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:AyDte.341235$cg1.16096@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote
>> gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote

>>> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support mirroring?

>> AFAIK no.

>>> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy)
>>> want to set up a fail safe backup/recovery system.

>>> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.

>> I can understand that very well.

>> My advice would be to do it yourself with a real computer running
>> Linux and software-RAID1, i.e. two disks that mirror each other.
>> Then export the space via NFS (if you use Linux/Unix) or
>> SAMBA (if you use Windows). For the server best use some older,
>> reliable hardware, e.g. an older computer you trust. If you buy
>> new hardware, go for older, reliable stuff, not cutting edge.
>> Also keep a spare disk handy.

>> The advantage of this approach is that you know what you get, you
>> understand the technology and you can repair/upgrade/modify it
>> yourself. The disadvantage is that it requires some work. I
>> don't think it will be more expensive.

> I've rarely seen such a bad set of advice.

Its not bad advice. I'd personally do it using Win and
RAID in the extra PC. Mainly because that give you a
lot more flexibility than with a ethernet hard drive box.

> The user should simply mirror two drives on a PC and then keep a 3rd[4th] HD
> for offsite backup. The 3rd[&4th] should be rotated offsite as a backup.

That wouldnt be as convenient to use.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 8:53:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:3hohlnFhi222U1@individual.net...
>
> Ron Reaugh <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
> news:AyDte.341235$cg1.16096@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> > Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote
> >> gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote
>
> >>> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
mirroring?
>
> >> AFAIK no.
>
> >>> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy)
> >>> want to set up a fail safe backup/recovery system.
>
> >>> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.
>
> >> I can understand that very well.
>
> >> My advice would be to do it yourself with a real computer running
> >> Linux and software-RAID1, i.e. two disks that mirror each other.
> >> Then export the space via NFS (if you use Linux/Unix) or
> >> SAMBA (if you use Windows). For the server best use some older,
> >> reliable hardware, e.g. an older computer you trust. If you buy
> >> new hardware, go for older, reliable stuff, not cutting edge.
> >> Also keep a spare disk handy.
>
> >> The advantage of this approach is that you know what you get, you
> >> understand the technology and you can repair/upgrade/modify it
> >> yourself. The disadvantage is that it requires some work. I
> >> don't think it will be more expensive.
>
> > I've rarely seen such a bad set of advice.
>
> Its not bad advice. I'd personally do it using Win and
> RAID in the extra PC. Mainly because that give you a
> lot more flexibility than with a ethernet hard drive box.
>
> > The user should simply mirror two drives on a PC and then keep a
3rd[4th] HD
> > for offsite backup. The 3rd[&4th] should be rotated offsite as a
backup.
>
> That wouldnt be as convenient to use.

Nonsense, it's the most convenient.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 10:36:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:B0Fte.995284$w62.987960@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>
> "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:3hohlnFhi222U1@individual.net...
>>
>> Ron Reaugh <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
>> news:AyDte.341235$cg1.16096@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>> > Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote
>> >> gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote
>>
>> >>> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
> mirroring?
>>
>> >> AFAIK no.
>>
>> >>> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy)
>> >>> want to set up a fail safe backup/recovery system.
>>
>> >>> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.
>>
>> >> I can understand that very well.
>>
>> >> My advice would be to do it yourself with a real computer running
>> >> Linux and software-RAID1, i.e. two disks that mirror each other.
>> >> Then export the space via NFS (if you use Linux/Unix) or
>> >> SAMBA (if you use Windows). For the server best use some older,
>> >> reliable hardware, e.g. an older computer you trust. If you buy
>> >> new hardware, go for older, reliable stuff, not cutting edge.
>> >> Also keep a spare disk handy.
>>
>> >> The advantage of this approach is that you know what you get, you
>> >> understand the technology and you can repair/upgrade/modify it
>> >> yourself. The disadvantage is that it requires some work. I
>> >> don't think it will be more expensive.
>>
>> > I've rarely seen such a bad set of advice.
>>
>> Its not bad advice. I'd personally do it using Win and
>> RAID in the extra PC. Mainly because that give you a
>> lot more flexibility than with a ethernet hard drive box.
>>
>> > The user should simply mirror two drives on a PC and then keep a
> 3rd[4th] HD
>> > for offsite backup. The 3rd[&4th] should be rotated offsite as a
> backup.
>>
>> That wouldnt be as convenient to use.
>
> Nonsense, it's the most convenient.

Nope, not if the PC cant handle the removal of the drives easily.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 10:36:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:3honm9Fi312aU1@individual.net...
>
> "Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
> news:B0Fte.995284$w62.987960@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> >
> > "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:3hohlnFhi222U1@individual.net...
> >>
> >> Ron Reaugh <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
> >> news:AyDte.341235$cg1.16096@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> >> > Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote
> >> >> gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote
> >>
> >> >>> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
> > mirroring?
> >>
> >> >> AFAIK no.
> >>
> >> >>> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy)
> >> >>> want to set up a fail safe backup/recovery system.
> >>
> >> >>> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.
> >>
> >> >> I can understand that very well.
> >>
> >> >> My advice would be to do it yourself with a real computer running
> >> >> Linux and software-RAID1, i.e. two disks that mirror each other.
> >> >> Then export the space via NFS (if you use Linux/Unix) or
> >> >> SAMBA (if you use Windows). For the server best use some older,
> >> >> reliable hardware, e.g. an older computer you trust. If you buy
> >> >> new hardware, go for older, reliable stuff, not cutting edge.
> >> >> Also keep a spare disk handy.
> >>
> >> >> The advantage of this approach is that you know what you get, you
> >> >> understand the technology and you can repair/upgrade/modify it
> >> >> yourself. The disadvantage is that it requires some work. I
> >> >> don't think it will be more expensive.
> >>
> >> > I've rarely seen such a bad set of advice.
> >>
> >> Its not bad advice. I'd personally do it using Win and
> >> RAID in the extra PC. Mainly because that give you a
> >> lot more flexibility than with a ethernet hard drive box.
> >>
> >> > The user should simply mirror two drives on a PC and then keep a
> > 3rd[4th] HD
> >> > for offsite backup. The 3rd[&4th] should be rotated offsite as a
> > backup.
> >>
> >> That wouldnt be as convenient to use.
> >
> > Nonsense, it's the most convenient.
>
> Nope, not if the PC cant handle the removal of the drives easily.

Nope, using SATA and removable trays like KingWin KF-83 it's the most
convenient.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 2:43:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:uxGte.995735$w62.562448@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>
> "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:3honm9Fi312aU1@individual.net...
>>
>> "Ron Reaugh" <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
>> news:B0Fte.995284$w62.987960@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>> >
>> > "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> > news:3hohlnFhi222U1@individual.net...
>> >>
>> >> Ron Reaugh <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
>> >> news:AyDte.341235$cg1.16096@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>> >> > Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote
>> >> >> gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote
>> >>
>> >> >>> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
>> > mirroring?
>> >>
>> >> >> AFAIK no.
>> >>
>> >> >>> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy)
>> >> >>> want to set up a fail safe backup/recovery system.
>> >>
>> >> >>> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.
>> >>
>> >> >> I can understand that very well.
>> >>
>> >> >> My advice would be to do it yourself with a real computer running
>> >> >> Linux and software-RAID1, i.e. two disks that mirror each other.
>> >> >> Then export the space via NFS (if you use Linux/Unix) or
>> >> >> SAMBA (if you use Windows). For the server best use some older,
>> >> >> reliable hardware, e.g. an older computer you trust. If you buy
>> >> >> new hardware, go for older, reliable stuff, not cutting edge.
>> >> >> Also keep a spare disk handy.
>> >>
>> >> >> The advantage of this approach is that you know what you get, you
>> >> >> understand the technology and you can repair/upgrade/modify it
>> >> >> yourself. The disadvantage is that it requires some work. I
>> >> >> don't think it will be more expensive.
>> >>
>> >> > I've rarely seen such a bad set of advice.
>> >>
>> >> Its not bad advice. I'd personally do it using Win and
>> >> RAID in the extra PC. Mainly because that give you a
>> >> lot more flexibility than with a ethernet hard drive box.
>> >>
>> >> > The user should simply mirror two drives on a PC and then keep a
>> > 3rd[4th] HD
>> >> > for offsite backup. The 3rd[&4th] should be rotated offsite as a
>> > backup.
>> >>
>> >> That wouldnt be as convenient to use.
>> >
>> > Nonsense, it's the most convenient.
>>
>> Nope, not if the PC cant handle the removal of the drives easily.

> Nope,

Yep.

> using SATA and removable trays like KingWin KF-83 it's the most convenient.

Assuming the number required will fit.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 5:47:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

In article <1gyeoek.dy242igktaaoN%neillmassello@earthlink.net>,
Neill Massello <neillmassello@earthlink.net> wrote:
>gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
>> mirroring?
>
>Buffalo <http://www.buffalotech.com/products/storage.php&gt; makes some
>multiple-drive NAS boxes that do RAID, but they're not exactly
>"inexpensive". Consumer NAS boxes contain a single drive and a USB port
>for an additional drive, but don't support any kind of RAID. There are
>some inexpensive dual-drive enclosures that do striping, but I don't
>know if any do mirroring reliably.
>
>
>> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy) want to set up a fail
>> safe backup/recovery system.
>>
>> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.
>
>Two drives will give you more backup safety for the buck if they're in
>separate enclosures (or hot-swap carriers) and kept in separate
>locations (or a fire safe). At least one of the two drives used for
>backup should not be powered up and mounted all the time. Not as
>convenient as a simple NAS mirror, but the minimum for a "fail-safe"
>system with two drives.
>

XP doesn't do RAID1. IMO putting a second disk in a machine and using
Acrinis TI or one of the other image backup tools is even better than
RAID1.

RAID1 doesn't give you the kind of backup lets you recover a file you
deleted by accident, or yesterday and want it back. Keeping
generations of images on a big second disk lets you do this. An Image
backup will give yo an easy way to protect yourself prior to doing a
major OS or applicaiton upgrade.

You can tell TI to break your images up to fit on CDR or DVDR media so
you can burn backups for offsite backup.

If you crash your C drive you get a replacement drive, boot the TI
recovery CD and restore. It takes just a few minutes. About a minute
per GB. If you need to be back in business immediatly buy a spare
disk.







--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 8:06:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Rod Speed wrote:

>Ron Reaugh <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote:

Schizophrenia in action. Fascinating. It's like watching Gollum and
Smeagol fight for control of the same body.

Except in this case, both personalities are evil.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 11:45:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

RAID 1 and backup are two different things and cover different exposures.
Both are often needed. And RAID 1 by switching drives can also cover backup
needs. Generally a compressed image backup like TrueImage to a removable HD
is the best backup solution. RAID 1 is very easy and inexpensive to get
these days. Most good mobos have it builtin for XP. An addon card is less
than $100 for RAID 1 on XP.

"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
news:D 99jse$3ap$1@panix5.panix.com...
> In article <1gyeoek.dy242igktaaoN%neillmassello@earthlink.net>,
> Neill Massello <neillmassello@earthlink.net> wrote:
> >gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
> >> mirroring?
> >
> >Buffalo <http://www.buffalotech.com/products/storage.php&gt; makes some
> >multiple-drive NAS boxes that do RAID, but they're not exactly
> >"inexpensive". Consumer NAS boxes contain a single drive and a USB port
> >for an additional drive, but don't support any kind of RAID. There are
> >some inexpensive dual-drive enclosures that do striping, but I don't
> >know if any do mirroring reliably.
> >
> >
> >> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy) want to set up a fail
> >> safe backup/recovery system.
> >>
> >> I'd like to have two external drives mirrored to each other.
> >
> >Two drives will give you more backup safety for the buck if they're in
> >separate enclosures (or hot-swap carriers) and kept in separate
> >locations (or a fire safe). At least one of the two drives used for
> >backup should not be powered up and mounted all the time. Not as
> >convenient as a simple NAS mirror, but the minimum for a "fail-safe"
> >system with two drives.
> >
>
> XP doesn't do RAID1. IMO putting a second disk in a machine and using
> Acrinis TI or one of the other image backup tools is even better than
> RAID1.
>
> RAID1 doesn't give you the kind of backup lets you recover a file you
> deleted by accident, or yesterday and want it back. Keeping
> generations of images on a big second disk lets you do this. An Image
> backup will give yo an easy way to protect yourself prior to doing a
> major OS or applicaiton upgrade.
>
> You can tell TI to break your images up to fit on CDR or DVDR media so
> you can burn backups for offsite backup.
>
> If you crash your C drive you get a replacement drive, boot the TI
> recovery CD and restore. It takes just a few minutes. About a minute
> per GB. If you need to be back in business immediatly buy a spare
> disk.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
>
> Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 21, 2005 11:45:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

In article <77_te.344859$cg1.318113@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>,
Ron Reaugh <ron-reaugh@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
>RAID 1 and backup are two different things and cover different exposures.
>Both are often needed. And RAID 1 by switching drives can also cover backup
>needs. Generally a compressed image backup like TrueImage to a removable HD
>is the best backup solution. RAID 1 is very easy and inexpensive to get
>these days. Most good mobos have it builtin for XP. An addon card is less
>than $100 for RAID 1 on XP.
>
>"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>news:D 99jse$3ap$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> In article <1gyeoek.dy242igktaaoN%neillmassello@earthlink.net>,
>> Neill Massello <neillmassello@earthlink.net> wrote:
>> >gstark33 <gstark33@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> >
>> >> Do any of the new inexpensive ethernet external drives support
>> >> mirroring?
>> >
>> >Buffalo <http://www.buffalotech.com/products/storage.php&gt; makes some
>> >multiple-drive NAS boxes that do RAID, but they're not exactly
>> >"inexpensive". Consumer NAS boxes contain a single drive and a USB port
>> >for an additional drive, but don't support any kind of RAID. There are
>> >some inexpensive dual-drive enclosures that do striping, but I don't
>> >know if any do mirroring reliably.
>> >
>> >
>> >> My wife now works from home and I (as her IT guy) want to set up a fail
>> >> safe backup/recovery system.
>> >>



Back to the OP, Raid1 isn't a backup system as the phrase is generally
used.




--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 22, 2005 7:34:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Puerile attempt at a troll flushed where it belongs.

Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl> wrote in message
news:42b82ca1$0$76394$892e7fe2@authen.white.readfreenews.net...
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 22, 2005 7:34:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:3hr1clFieg2gU1@individual.net
> Puerile attempt at a troll flushed where it belongs.

See!?!. It's not in your nature.

>
> Folkert Rienstra <see_reply-to@myweb.nl> wrote in message
> news:42b82ca1$0$76394$892e7fe2@authen.white.readfreenews.net...
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 23, 2005 4:52:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

To be able to perform mirroring you need to have RAID support two
solutiosn come to mind if you require a professional setup with
reailibilty

LaCie do good options
and also Nexon

www.lacie.com
www.thenexon.com

Hope this helps
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 27, 2005 11:01:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On 6/19/2005 14:56, dg wrote:

> I was disappointed to find out that XP does *not* support mirroring. At
> least not by itself in software

Nonsense! It most certainly does, at least in XP Prof. Be aware that you
need to be using "Dynamic Disks" to do any sort of OS software based RAID.
Go to disk management, click help, help topics. Switch to the index
tab. Type "mir". Observe that "mirror sets, creating" is highlighted.

That said, I've found through the hard way that a hardware raid card is
best and easiest when it comes time to actually deal with a failed disk.
I would never ever recommend software mirroring on windows to someone with
less than an expert level of computer ability. Linux SW RAID may be
reliable but it's asinine to think that even a well versed windows user
could easily switch to using that without an enormous, time wasting effort.

For the OP, looks like Buffalo tech has the TeraStation 1 Tera byte model
that can do mirroring (you get then 500Gigs of storage) and heck, it's
only a grand; what a bargain!
<http://www.buffalotech.com/products/product-detail.php?...;

~Jason

--
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 28, 2005 2:44:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Jason Gurtz <ask@NOmeSPAM.where> wrote in message
news:11c11aa7t76ga6d@corp.supernews.com...
> dg wrote

>> I was disappointed to find out that XP does *not* support mirroring.
>> At least not by itself in software

> Nonsense! It most certainly does, at least in XP Prof. Be aware that you
> need to be using "Dynamic Disks" to do any sort of OS software based
> RAID. Go to disk management, click help, help topics. Switch to the index
> tab. Type "mir". Observe that "mirror sets, creating" is highlighted.

Pity that leads via the internal link to Creating a mirror Volume to the
statement

a.. You can create mirrored volumes only on computers running Windows 2000
Server,
a.. Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server.

> That said, I've found through the hard way that a hardware raid card is
> best and easiest when it comes time to actually deal with a failed disk.
> I would never ever recommend software mirroring on windows to
> someone with less than an expert level of computer ability. Linux SW RAID
> may be reliable but it's asinine to think that even a well versed windows user
> could easily switch to using that without an enormous, time wasting effort.

In spades when the OS doesnt even support it.

> For the OP, looks like Buffalo tech has the TeraStation 1 Tera
> byte model that can do mirroring (you get then 500Gigs of
> storage) and heck, it's only a grand; what a bargain!
> <http://www.buffalotech.com/products/product-detail.php?...;
June 28, 2005 2:44:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

> a.. You can create mirrored volumes only on computers running Windows 2000
> Server,
> a.. Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server.

Or, from more recent help file:
"-You can mirror volumes only on computers running Windows 2000 Server,
Windows 2000 Advanced Server, Windows 2000 Datacenter Server, or
the Windows Server 2003 family of operating systems."
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 28, 2005 5:50:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Peter <peterfoxghost@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:_K2we.4590$mK5.307890@news20.bellglobal.com...

>> a.. You can create mirrored volumes only on computers running Windows 2000
>> Server, a.. Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server.

> Or, from more recent help file:
> "-You can mirror volumes only on computers running Windows 2000 Server,
> Windows 2000 Advanced Server, Windows 2000 Datacenter Server, or
> the Windows Server 2003 family of operating systems."

Thanks for that, I assumed they'd have to update that soon to
include the Windows Server 2003 family. Mine is from XP Pro SP2.
!