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Ghost 9.0 not restoring properly (another Ghost story)

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Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 22, 2005 11:04:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

I'm using XP Home SP2 on a year old Dell PC, and have a problem with
Ghost 9.0 (as do many). As a test to see if it would work properly, I
backed up the contents of my internal hard drive (consisting of just
the primary partition) to my USB drive. The backup went fine. I then
put in a new, formatted (ntfs as are all my drives) drive in place of
the internal one just backed up, and rebooted using the Ghost boot
disk to restore the image from the USB drive. The setting I specified
for the restore was: Set drive active [for booting os], After the
restore process finished, I rebooted only to get this message: Windows
could not start because of a computer disk hardware configuration
problem. Could not read from the selected boot disk.

There were two v2i files on the USB drive I restored from, one called
C_Drive v21, termed a Symantec Image file (which I chose to restore),
and a very small second one, XXXX (a series of letters specifying my
PC id).v2i, termed a Symantec Recovery Disk file, which I did not
restore.

Should both files have been restored? Does the sequence of restoring
them both matter (since the program will only restore one at a time)?
If this second small file is irrelevant to restoring, any suggestions
for getting a successful restore?

Thanks
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 22, 2005 11:48:25 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

cuz202 <r274@mail.com> wrote:

>I'm using XP Home SP2 on a year old Dell PC, and have a problem with
>Ghost 9.0 (as do many). As a test to see if it would work properly, I
>backed up the contents of my internal hard drive (consisting of just
>the primary partition) to my USB drive. The backup went fine. I then
>put in a new, formatted (ntfs as are all my drives) drive in place of
>the internal one just backed up, and rebooted using the Ghost boot
>disk to restore the image from the USB drive. The setting I specified
>for the restore was: Set drive active [for booting os], After the
>restore process finished, I rebooted only to get this message: Windows
>could not start because of a computer disk hardware configuration
>problem. Could not read from the selected boot disk.

I've never had a problem with Ghost 9.0, and I've restored my boot
drive many times.

>
>There were two v2i files on the USB drive I restored from, one called
>C_Drive v21, termed a Symantec Image file (which I chose to restore),
>and a very small second one, XXXX (a series of letters specifying my
>PC id).v2i, termed a Symantec Recovery Disk file, which I did not
>restore.
>
>Should both files have been restored? Does the sequence of restoring
>them both matter (since the program will only restore one at a time)?
>If this second small file is irrelevant to restoring, any suggestions
>for getting a successful restore?

The PC ID file has a type of .sv2i and is actually an XML file
describing the most recent partitions backed up. It's an index file
only used when restoring multiple drives. Restoring the large .v2i
file is all you need to do.

Try verifying the image before restoring it. Also, select "restore
MBR" and "restore original disk signature", and "check for file system
errors after restore". You can also try booting the recovery console
from your XP CD-ROM and trying the repair option, although I;ve never
needed to do that.

_______________________________________________
Colin Sewell mailto:csewell@telus.net
Vancouver, BC
Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 23, 2005 12:22:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

"cuz202" <r274@mail.com> wrote in message
news:bgvhb1pg978o257dj73ct7b35l28glr6t3@4ax.com...
> I'm using XP Home SP2 on a year old Dell PC, and have a problem with
> Ghost 9.0 (as do many). As a test to see if it would work properly, I
> backed up the contents of my internal hard drive (consisting of just
> the primary partition) to my USB drive. The backup went fine. I then
> put in a new, formatted (ntfs as are all my drives) drive in place of
> the internal one just backed up, and rebooted using the Ghost boot
> disk to restore the image from the USB drive. The setting I specified
> for the restore was: Set drive active [for booting os], After the
> restore process finished, I rebooted only to get this message: Windows
> could not start because of a computer disk hardware configuration
> problem. Could not read from the selected boot disk.
>
> There were two v2i files on the USB drive I restored from, one called
> C_Drive v21, termed a Symantec Image file (which I chose to restore),
> and a very small second one, XXXX (a series of letters specifying my
> PC id).v2i, termed a Symantec Recovery Disk file, which I did not
> restore.
>
> Should both files have been restored? Does the sequence of restoring
> them both matter (since the program will only restore one at a time)?
> If this second small file is irrelevant to restoring, any suggestions
> for getting a successful restore?
>
> Thanks

Did you select to verify the image after the image was created? This is an
easily overlooked option. But in my view essential. It can take some time
to create an image especially if its a large partition and the files don't
easily compress. So it makes sense to double check its OK before making any
changes to your system. Only you can put a value on how important your data
is i.e how much will it hurt if you lost all your data??

Assuming that your image was valid its possible that windows itself is
getting upset by the presence of the new drive i.e it isn't the same one
when you last time you booted up. Normally windows would just recognise new
hardware but as this is your boot drive that could upset it sufficiently.

I'd suggest booting from your XP CD and trying a repair install.

The same sort of thing can happen when swapping the motherboard for a
different type and fortunately I've found a repair install is all that's
required to recognise the new components. This doesn't work every time for
everyone. As they say YMMV.

Backup and then verify they're OK. Then make copies of your backups, verify
them and then store them somewhere else off site.

Paranoid? Neurotic? Pedantic? Maybe but I wont be crying when (inevitably)
my hard drive/s fail.

Let us know how you get on.

Good luck

Ian
!