Cheap Enclosure for 4 IDE drives?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

I've got 4 80GB Drives that I'd like to redeploy in my house, but my
existing computers don't have any free IDE connexions, PCI slots, or drive
bays. I also don't want to create another complete PC in my house.

I've seen some IDE-raid enclosures, but they are all prohibitively expensive.

I've seen IDE->USB adapters cheap on Ebay (~$12 each). I'm thinking I could
grab 4 of these, connect my drives to a hub, and place them all in a small
PC tower, and connect the hub to one of my computers. It wouldn't be
pretty, but it would be fairly inexpensive.

What are people's thoughts on this? Are there better solutions?


--
..............................................................................

Tell people something they know already and they will thank you for it. Tell
them something new and they will hate you for it.

-George Monbiot

..............................................................................
dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
43 answers Last reply
More about cheap enclosure drives
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    I you don't have a case that holds 5 drives, get one for $30.
    Far cheaper and safer than USB enclosures without fans.

    <p1mp_ju1c3@salmahayeksknockers.edu> wrote in message news:PXTye.133295$on1.91681@clgrps13...
    > I've got 4 80GB Drives that I'd like to redeploy in my house, but my
    > existing computers don't have any free IDE connexions, PCI slots, or drive
    > bays. I also don't want to create another complete PC in my house.
    >
    > I've seen some IDE-raid enclosures, but they are all prohibitively expensive.
    >
    > I've seen IDE->USB adapters cheap on Ebay (~$12 each). I'm thinking I could
    > grab 4 of these, connect my drives to a hub, and place them all in a small
    > PC tower, and connect the hub to one of my computers. It wouldn't be
    > pretty, but it would be fairly inexpensive.
    >
    > What are people's thoughts on this? Are there better solutions?
    >
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    <p1mp_ju1c3@salmahayeksknockers.edu> wrote in message
    news:PXTye.133295$on1.91681@clgrps13...
    > I've got 4 80GB Drives that I'd like to redeploy in my house, but my
    > existing computers don't have any free IDE connexions, PCI slots, or drive
    > bays. I also don't want to create another complete PC in my house.
    >
    > I've seen some IDE-raid enclosures, but they are all prohibitively
    expensive.
    >
    > I've seen IDE->USB adapters cheap on Ebay (~$12 each). I'm thinking I
    could
    > grab 4 of these, connect my drives to a hub, and place them all in a small
    > PC tower,

    Well it would work but.. If you've got a PC standing idle perhaps you could
    build a server? Instead of USB adaptors and a hub connect them to the
    motherboard and fit a LAN card.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    I started to reply with another option, but you know what, it seems silly to
    put money into using those old drives. I mean, $12 each adapter, a USB hub,
    cables, PC case, that adds up to a fair bit of money just to use the old
    drives. Sure you may have some of the stuff lying around, but you could put
    the money towards a 250GB or larger drive for so cheap its crazy, and it
    will have a warranty!

    Then after you get the big 250GB+ drive maybe use one of the 80GB drives in
    a portable USB enclosure for convenience, if one 80GB drive dies in the
    enclosure you have 3 more to replace it with!

    --Dan


    <p1mp_ju1c3@salmahayeksknockers.edu> wrote in message
    news:PXTye.133295$on1.91681@clgrps13...
    > I've got 4 80GB Drives that I'd like to redeploy in my house, but my
    > existing computers don't have any free IDE connexions, PCI slots, or drive
    > bays. I also don't want to create another complete PC in my house.
    >
    > I've seen some IDE-raid enclosures, but they are all prohibitively
    > expensive.
    >
    > I've seen IDE->USB adapters cheap on Ebay (~$12 each). I'm thinking I
    > could
    > grab 4 of these, connect my drives to a hub, and place them all in a small
    > PC tower, and connect the hub to one of my computers. It wouldn't be
    > pretty, but it would be fairly inexpensive.
    >
    > What are people's thoughts on this? Are there better solutions?
    >
    >
    > --
    > .............................................................................
    >
    > Tell people something they know already and they will thank you for it.
    > Tell
    > them something new and they will hate you for it.
    >
    > -George Monbiot
    >
    > .............................................................................
    > dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com
    > http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    <p1mp_ju1c3@salmahayeksknockers.edu> wrote in message
    news:PXTye.133295$on1.91681@clgrps13...

    > I've seen IDE->USB adapters cheap on Ebay (~$12 each). I'm thinking I
    could
    > grab 4 of these, connect my drives to a hub, and place them all in a
    small
    > PC tower, and connect the hub to one of my computers. It wouldn't be
    > pretty, but it would be fairly inexpensive.

    I'm curious, are you planning on using an AT PS? ~ 2tec
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general Tom2Tec <nospamfor.tom2tec@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > I'm curious, are you planning on using an AT PS? ~ 2tec

    Yep. At least with my current "Design", which is very subject to change.

    The USB->IDE adaptors I'm looking at come with 110VAC->12VDC converters
    that plug right into the drives, but a PC PS would be more practical
    (Less cabling/outlets used).


    --
    ..............................................................................

    "The biggest cause of trouble in the world today is that the stupid people
    are so sure about things and the intelligent folks are so full of doubts."

    -Bertrand Russell

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    <p1mp_ju1c3@salmahayeksknockers.edu> wrote in
    message news:PXTye.133295$on1.91681@clgrps13...

    > I've got 4 80GB Drives that I'd like to redeploy in my house, but my
    > existing computers don't have any free IDE connexions, PCI slots, or
    > drive bays. I also don't want to create another complete PC in my house.

    > I've seen some IDE-raid enclosures, but they are all prohibitively expensive.

    > I've seen IDE->USB adapters cheap on Ebay (~$12 each). I'm
    > thinking I could grab 4 of these, connect my drives to a hub, and
    > place them all in a small PC tower, and connect the hub to one of
    > my computers. It wouldn't be pretty, but it would be fairly inexpensive.

    > What are people's thoughts on this? Are there better solutions?

    I think another PC for those 4 drives makes more sense.

    Or decide that you collection of drives is getting a tad bizarre and
    replace the smaller drives with much bigger drives, say 250G drives.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > I think another PC for those 4 drives makes more sense.

    Thus unnecessarily adding another OS, and additional hardware for me to maintain.

    > Or decide that you collection of drives is getting a tad bizarre and
    > replace the smaller drives with much bigger drives, say 250G drives.

    Already done. These 80GB are the leftovers, but still have life in them.


    --
    ..............................................................................

    Even if you do learn to speak correct English, whom are you going
    to speak it to?
    - Clarence Darrow

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    j4m4l_$1xp4ck@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:
    >>Or decide that you collection of drives is getting a tad bizarre and
    >>replace the smaller drives with much bigger drives, say 250G drives.
    >
    > Already done. These 80GB are the leftovers, but still have life in them.
    >

    Dan,

    I think the USB path isn't a bad idea, but I'll suggest a few things.

    1) Buy a separate PCI/USB Controller card (or two) for this, they can be
    had as cheap as $30. Because USB is a shared network (and not all that
    fast to begin with) spreading the drives across a couple of separate
    controllers, or at least dedicating a controller just to this, will
    greatly improve the performance. I know that may not be your goal, but
    neither is something that is so slow it becomes nearly unusable.

    2) Ditch the idea of using a hub, it'll just be a bottleneck.

    3) make sure that enclosure has a couple of fans in it besides the power
    supply fan, if possible. Hard drive do generate a lot of heat.

    4) If you wanted to get real fancy, consider having the drives them
    selves in those removable drive bays you can buy, and hook the usb
    adapter kits to those. This way you could have the advantages of making
    it easy to hot swap drive in and out, and the USB convenience. It would
    cost a bunch more money, but it is an interesting idea.

    5) If you hook it up to a Linux box, as opposed to a windows one, you
    might want to explore using RAID on them to make them appear as a single
    larger volume (RAID5). I have no idea how good it would work in
    practice, but it might be interesting to play with.

    Let us know how it turns out. I'd also be interested in knowing if the
    Ebay deal pans out. I have two 40GB USB drives, by Microsolutions which
    use their goofy backpack (Colorado) hardware. It is a major pain as you
    need special drivers to deal with them. I wouldn't mind retrofitting
    them with a real USB/IDE kit of some sort.

    --
    ====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    <j4m4l_$1xp4ck@salmahayeksknockers.edu> wrote:

    > These 80GB are the leftovers, but still have life in them.

    Then sell 'em or give 'em away. It sounds like you're casting around for
    a way to "use" hardware that you no longer need -- like the people who
    set up an old computer to do SETI so they can pretend that they're
    putting it to use.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    j4m4l_$1xp4ck@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:

    > In calgary.general Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >> I think another PC for those 4 drives makes more sense.
    >
    > Thus unnecessarily adding another OS, and additional hardware for me to
    > maintain.

    How much maintenance do you think a server _needs_? A good server is
    something that you turn on and forget about.

    >> Or decide that you collection of drives is getting a tad bizarre and
    >> replace the smaller drives with much bigger drives, say 250G drives.
    >
    > Already done. These 80GB are the leftovers, but still have life in them.
    >
    >
    >

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    Also as an interesting alternative BTW AoE (ATA over Ethernet) has been
    getting quite a bit of press recently. It isn't in your price range I
    suspect (It really is designed more to be a datacenter solution), but
    the technology is interesting. http://www.coraid.com for more information.

    Dice wrote:
    > j4m4l_$1xp4ck@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:
    >
    >>> Or decide that you collection of drives is getting a tad bizarre and
    >>> replace the smaller drives with much bigger drives, say 250G drives.
    >>
    >>
    >> Already done. These 80GB are the leftovers, but still have life in them.
    >>
    >
    > Dan,
    >
    > I think the USB path isn't a bad idea, but I'll suggest a few things.
    >
    > 1) Buy a separate PCI/USB Controller card (or two) for this, they can be
    > had as cheap as $30. Because USB is a shared network (and not all that
    > fast to begin with) spreading the drives across a couple of separate
    > controllers, or at least dedicating a controller just to this, will
    > greatly improve the performance. I know that may not be your goal, but
    > neither is something that is so slow it becomes nearly unusable.
    >
    > 2) Ditch the idea of using a hub, it'll just be a bottleneck.
    >
    > 3) make sure that enclosure has a couple of fans in it besides the power
    > supply fan, if possible. Hard drive do generate a lot of heat.
    >
    > 4) If you wanted to get real fancy, consider having the drives them
    > selves in those removable drive bays you can buy, and hook the usb
    > adapter kits to those. This way you could have the advantages of making
    > it easy to hot swap drive in and out, and the USB convenience. It would
    > cost a bunch more money, but it is an interesting idea.
    >
    > 5) If you hook it up to a Linux box, as opposed to a windows one, you
    > might want to explore using RAID on them to make them appear as a single
    > larger volume (RAID5). I have no idea how good it would work in
    > practice, but it might be interesting to play with.
    >
    > Let us know how it turns out. I'd also be interested in knowing if the
    > Ebay deal pans out. I have two 40GB USB drives, by Microsolutions which
    > use their goofy backpack (Colorado) hardware. It is a major pain as you
    > need special drivers to deal with them. I wouldn't mind retrofitting
    > them with a real USB/IDE kit of some sort.
    >


    --
    ====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    <j4m4l_$1xp4ck@salmahayeksknockers.edu> wrote in
    message news:jIVye.133446$on1.124073@clgrps13...
    > Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote

    >> I think another PC for those 4 drives makes more sense.

    > Thus unnecessarily adding another OS,

    Thats a complete yawn in practice.

    > and additional hardware for me to maintain.

    Less maintenance required than your 4*USB2 enclosures, you watch.

    >> Or decide that you collection of drives is getting a tad bizarre and
    >> replace the smaller drives with much bigger drives, say 250G drives.

    > Already done. These 80GB are the leftovers, but still have life in them.

    Life is irrelevant if you have to cobble up an abortion to use them.
    Makes a lot more sense to replace them with a single drive.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    Dice <dice@wilddice.org> wrote in message
    news:RyWye.109912$9A2.39604@edtnps89...

    > Also as an interesting alternative BTW AoE (ATA over Ethernet) has been
    > getting quite a bit of press recently. It isn't in your price range I suspect

    Corse it isnt.

    > (It really is designed more to be a datacenter solution),

    And is completely unsuitable for using some 80G discards.

    > but the technology is interesting. http://www.coraid.com for more information.

    A basic obsolete PC makes a lot more sense in his situation.


    > Dice wrote:
    >> j4m4l_$1xp4ck@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Or decide that you collection of drives is getting a tad bizarre and
    >>>> replace the smaller drives with much bigger drives, say 250G drives.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Already done. These 80GB are the leftovers, but still have life in them.
    >>>
    >>
    >> Dan,
    >>
    >> I think the USB path isn't a bad idea, but I'll suggest a few things.
    >>
    >> 1) Buy a separate PCI/USB Controller card (or two) for this, they can be had
    >> as cheap as $30. Because USB is a shared network (and not all that fast to
    >> begin with) spreading the drives across a couple of separate controllers, or
    >> at least dedicating a controller just to this, will greatly improve the
    >> performance. I know that may not be your goal, but neither is something that
    >> is so slow it becomes nearly unusable.
    >>
    >> 2) Ditch the idea of using a hub, it'll just be a bottleneck.
    >>
    >> 3) make sure that enclosure has a couple of fans in it besides the power
    >> supply fan, if possible. Hard drive do generate a lot of heat.
    >>
    >> 4) If you wanted to get real fancy, consider having the drives them selves in
    >> those removable drive bays you can buy, and hook the usb adapter kits to
    >> those. This way you could have the advantages of making it easy to hot swap
    >> drive in and out, and the USB convenience. It would cost a bunch more money,
    >> but it is an interesting idea.
    >>
    >> 5) If you hook it up to a Linux box, as opposed to a windows one, you might
    >> want to explore using RAID on them to make them appear as a single larger
    >> volume (RAID5). I have no idea how good it would work in practice, but it
    >> might be interesting to play with.
    >>
    >> Let us know how it turns out. I'd also be interested in knowing if the Ebay
    >> deal pans out. I have two 40GB USB drives, by Microsolutions which use their
    >> goofy backpack (Colorado) hardware. It is a major pain as you need special
    >> drivers to deal with them. I wouldn't mind retrofitting them with a real
    >> USB/IDE kit of some sort.
    >>
    >
    >
    > --
    > ====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    <p1mp_ju1c3@salmahayeksknockers.edu> wrote in message
    news:PXTye.133295$on1.91681@clgrps13...
    > I've got 4 80GB Drives that I'd like to redeploy in my house, but my
    > existing computers don't have any free IDE connexions, PCI slots, or drive
    > bays. I also don't want to create another complete PC in my house.
    >
    > I've seen some IDE-raid enclosures, but they are all prohibitively
    expensive.
    >
    > I've seen IDE->USB adapters cheap on Ebay (~$12 each). I'm thinking I
    could
    > grab 4 of these, connect my drives to a hub, and place them all in a small
    > PC tower, and connect the hub to one of my computers. It wouldn't be
    > pretty, but it would be fairly inexpensive.
    >
    > What are people's thoughts on this? Are there better solutions?
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    .............................................................................
    ..
    >
    > Tell people something they know already and they will thank you for it.
    Tell
    > them something new and they will hate you for it.
    >
    > -George Monbiot
    >
    >
    .............................................................................
    ..
    > dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com
    http://www.memeticcandiru.com

    Admittedly, this is probably a bit more expensive than you intended, but
    interesting:
    http://www.usbgear.com/Dual_bay_firewire_case_enclosure/

    http://www.aicmicro.com/productdetail.asp?id=21815

    Stay away from hubs, whatever you choose to do.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
    news:U68ze.17417$pa3.10067@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > <p1mp_ju1c3@salmahayeksknockers.edu> wrote in message
    > news:PXTye.133295$on1.91681@clgrps13...
    > Admittedly, this is probably a bit more expensive than you intended, but
    > interesting:
    > http://www.usbgear.com/Dual_bay_firewire_case_enclosure/
    >
    > http://www.aicmicro.com/productdetail.asp?id=21815
    >
    > Stay away from hubs, whatever you choose to do.
    >


    Likewise these are smart...
    see Sohotank..
    http://www.stardom.com.tw/web/product.htm
    Any interface you want.
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general Lil' Dave <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote:

    > Admittedly, this is probably a bit more expensive than you intended, but
    > interesting:
    > http://www.usbgear.com/Dual_bay_firewire_case_enclosure/

    I've seen those, but you're right: Too expensive... And no room to expand.
    I want my enclosure to have more room so I can add more 80GB drives down the
    road as they get cheaper, and expand my raid 5 array.

    > Stay away from hubs, whatever you choose to do.

    Splain? You mean USB hubs?

    --
    ..............................................................................

    The search for truth is more precious than its possession.

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  17. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general dg <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > I started to reply with another option, but you know what, it seems silly to
    > put money into using those old drives. I mean, $12 each adapter, a USB hub,
    > cables, PC case, that adds up to a fair bit of money just to use the old
    > drives. Sure you may have some of the stuff lying around, but you could put
    > the money towards a 250GB or larger drive for so cheap its crazy, and it
    > will have a warranty!

    > Then after you get the big 250GB+ drive maybe use one of the 80GB drives in
    > a portable USB enclosure for convenience, if one 80GB drive dies in the
    > enclosure you have 3 more to replace it with!

    I already have several higher-capacity drives. I'm looking to create a
    poor man's JBOD, and raid-5 it. 80GB extra is useless to me... but 240GB
    or more can be used as a backup pool. As 80GB drives get cheaper and
    cheaper, it will be pennies to extend my existing raid 5 set.


    --
    ..............................................................................

    "After we become a strong force as the result of the creation of the state,
    we shall abolish partition and expand to the whole of Palestine. "

    - Isreali founding father David Ben-Gurion

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  18. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general J. Clarke <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote:
    > j4m4l_$1xp4ck@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:

    >> In calgary.general Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I think another PC for those 4 drives makes more sense.
    >>
    >> Thus unnecessarily adding another OS, and additional hardware for me to
    >> maintain.

    > How much maintenance do you think a server _needs_? A good server is
    > something that you turn on and forget about.

    Gross oversimlification. You're not an IT manager, are you?

    Any unnecessary complexity introduces more points of failure - Which
    inevitably increases the amount of time I will spend maintaining it down the
    road.


    --
    ..............................................................................

    "Take the Anti-Defamation League [of B'nai B'rith] It's actually an
    organization devoted to trying to defame and intimidate and silence people
    who criticize current Israeli policies, whatever they may be"

    -Noam Chomsky, Language and Politics

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  19. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    h1dd3n_h4m$73r@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:

    > In calgary.general J. Clarke <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote:
    >> j4m4l_$1xp4ck@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:
    >
    >>> In calgary.general Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I think another PC for those 4 drives makes more sense.
    >>>
    >>> Thus unnecessarily adding another OS, and additional hardware for me to
    >>> maintain.
    >
    >> How much maintenance do you think a server _needs_? A good server is
    >> something that you turn on and forget about.
    >
    > Gross oversimlification. You're not an IT manager, are you?

    We weren't talking about an IT department.

    > Any unnecessary complexity introduces more points of failure - Which
    > inevitably increases the amount of time I will spend maintaining it down
    > the road.

    Then you don't know how to configure a server.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  20. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general Dice <dice@wilddice.org> wrote:

    > Dan,

    > I think the USB path isn't a bad idea, but I'll suggest a few things.

    Dice, yours is easily the most helpful post in this thread. I think you
    "get" what I am trying to do.

    > 1) Buy a separate PCI/USB Controller card (or two) for this, they can be
    > had as cheap as $30. Because USB is a shared network (and not all that
    > fast to begin with) spreading the drives across a couple of separate
    > controllers, or at least dedicating a controller just to this, will
    > greatly improve the performance. I know that may not be your goal, but
    > neither is something that is so slow it becomes nearly unusable.

    No PCI slots on my server, unfortunately.

    > 2) Ditch the idea of using a hub, it'll just be a bottleneck.

    What you're saying makes complete sense, but unfortunately, my constraints
    rule out multiple USB buses. Thankfully, performance isn't important - As
    long as I'm getting reasonable and realiable throughput, that's sufficient.


    > 3) make sure that enclosure has a couple of fans in it besides the power
    > supply fan, if possible. Hard drive do generate a lot of heat.

    Very true, and a point worth emphasising.

    > 4) If you wanted to get real fancy, consider having the drives them
    > selves in those removable drive bays you can buy, and hook the usb
    > adapter kits to those. This way you could have the advantages of making
    > it easy to hot swap drive in and out, and the USB convenience. It would
    > cost a bunch more money, but it is an interesting idea.

    Another excellent idea. Although this increases cost, this will make adding
    and replacing disks down the road easier. I'm sure if I keep my eyes open
    on ebay, I will find a lot auction for cheap.

    > 5) If you hook it up to a Linux box, as opposed to a windows one, you
    > might want to explore using RAID on them to make them appear as a single
    > larger volume (RAID5). I have no idea how good it would work in
    > practice, but it might be interesting to play with.

    That's exactly where I'm headed. My server is Linux, and I want to hook up
    this "Poor Man's JBOD", Raid5 it with software, and use it as a backuppool
    for TSM.

    > Let us know how it turns out. I'd also be interested in knowing if the
    > Ebay deal pans out. I have two 40GB USB drives, by Microsolutions which
    > use their goofy backpack (Colorado) hardware. It is a major pain as you
    > need special drivers to deal with them. I wouldn't mind retrofitting
    > them with a real USB/IDE kit of some sort.

    I don't think it'll be hard to get adapters off of Ebay. There're plentiful
    and cheap on there already, and I'm sure will get more plentiful and
    cheaper down the road.

    This thread has helped me cement some of the ideas I was tossing around in
    my head. I think the next step for me is to do some napkin-math to figure
    out costs and options, and depending on the numbers, start looking for a
    cheap 7-bay enclosure. If I pursue it, I'll definitely post the outcome
    here.


    --
    ..............................................................................

    Even if you do learn to speak correct English, whom are you going
    to speak it to?
    - Clarence Darrow

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  21. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    On Thu, 07 Jul 2005 16:31:33 GMT,
    h1dd3n_h4m$73r@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:

    >In calgary.general Lil' Dave <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Admittedly, this is probably a bit more expensive than you intended, but
    >> interesting:
    >> http://www.usbgear.com/Dual_bay_firewire_case_enclosure/
    >
    >I've seen those, but you're right: Too expensive... And no room to expand.
    >I want my enclosure to have more room so I can add more 80GB drives down the
    >road as they get cheaper, and expand my raid 5 array.

    Just out of curiosity, are you planning on using software or hardware
    raid 5? I keep hoping the pricing on decent raid 5 sata cards will
    drop, but it's yet to happen. In the meantime, I've got several
    terabytes of music & video languishing on optical media.
  22. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    Helper Monkey Assault Squad 7 wrote:
    > Just out of curiosity, are you planning on using software or hardware
    > raid 5? I keep hoping the pricing on decent raid 5 sata cards will
    > drop, but it's yet to happen. In the meantime, I've got several
    > terabytes of music & video languishing on optical media.

    Given the extremely low overhead of software raid (even under Windows),
    why wait?

    The bigger issue is hooking up the devices (especially if you have more
    than 4). Dan's idea is quite interesting, and expandable, while IDE, and
    SATA adapters are out there they just don't have lots of long term
    expandability. Using USB like Dan is looking at or AoE (which I
    mentioned earlier) you in essence are able to build a 'poor mans' SAN.

    --
    ====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+
  23. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    In calgary.general J. Clarke <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote:

    > Then you don't know how to configure a server.

    Actually, I do - And am unwilling to invest the time configuring
    functionality I don't need.

    Which.
    is.
    the.
    point.


    --
    ..............................................................................

    "Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to
    make you commit injustices,"
    -Voltaire

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  24. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general Helper Monkey Assault Squad 7 <hmas7@grapeape.com> wrote:

    > Just out of curiosity, are you planning on using software or hardware
    > raid 5? I keep hoping the pricing on decent raid 5 sata cards will
    > drop, but it's yet to happen. In the meantime, I've got several
    > terabytes of music & video languishing on optical media.

    It would have to be software. I have no hardware which would allow the
    introduction of a raid card. I would connect the drives as USB, and then
    use soft tools to configure a set.


    --
    ..............................................................................

    "The London Sunday Times found evidence of torture [by Israel] so
    widespread and systematic that 'it appears to be sanctioned at some level
    as deliberate policy,' perhaps 'to persuade Arabs in occupied territories
    that it is least painful to behave passively'"

    -Noam Chomsky, The Fateful Triangle, p 127

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  25. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    h1dd3n_h4m$73r@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:
    > Dice, yours is easily the most helpful post in this thread. I think you
    > "get" what I am trying to do.

    Thanks, I'm a storage geek after all.

    > What you're saying makes complete sense, but unfortunately, my constraints
    > rule out multiple USB buses. Thankfully, performance isn't important - As
    > long as I'm getting reasonable and realiable throughput, that's sufficient.

    Go for a really good USB hub then. I would spend a little more money on
    the hub, and get a 8 port hub (for expandability). Cascading hubs while
    possible, isn't recommended or probably very desirable.

    > That's exactly where I'm headed. My server is Linux, and I want to hook up
    > this "Poor Man's JBOD", Raid5 it with software, and use it as a backuppool
    > for TSM.

    Raided USB Drives, I'll give you this it's an interesting idea.

    --
    ====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+
  26. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    Rod Speed wrote:
    >>Also as an interesting alternative BTW AoE (ATA over Ethernet) has been
    >>getting quite a bit of press recently. It isn't in your price range I suspect
    >
    > Corse it isnt.

    I'm sorry I didn't realize you were Dan's personal accountant.

    >
    >>(It really is designed more to be a datacenter solution),
    >
    > And is completely unsuitable for using some 80G discards.
    >

    Not really, AoE using some discarded 80GB drives might be completely
    suitable for a technology enthusiast to play with.

    >>but the technology is interesting. http://www.coraid.com for more information.
    >
    > A basic obsolete PC makes a lot more sense in his situation.

    Maybe, but as I said, this was merely an interesting alternative.

    --
    ====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+
  27. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    On Thu, 07 Jul 2005 18:30:18 GMT, Dice <dice@wilddice.org> wrote:

    >Helper Monkey Assault Squad 7 wrote:
    >> Just out of curiosity, are you planning on using software or hardware
    >> raid 5? I keep hoping the pricing on decent raid 5 sata cards will
    >> drop, but it's yet to happen. In the meantime, I've got several
    >> terabytes of music & video languishing on optical media.
    >
    >Given the extremely low overhead of software raid (even under Windows),
    >why wait?

    A couple reasons: I'm running XP Pro vs Server 2003. I could install
    2003, but I like playing games, don't feel like having to boot into
    server to listen to music, and have no real desire to buy additional
    hardware at this point--a laptop and a fast desktop are enough.

    My motherboard only supports two sata drives (ASUS P4P800 Del), and
    I'd rather not have to blow $40 a drive on adaptors. I could switch
    out the motherboard, but then I'd likely want to go for a board with
    PCI-express, thus making making 2.4 ghz CPU (currently running at 3.6
    ghz) and $500 worth of dual channel memory worthless.

    Other than that, it would work great. :)

    So currently it's a waiting game as to what keeps cheap first: sata
    raid cards, wireless nas boxes, or a replacement desktop (then I'll
    use this as a full-time server).
  28. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    h1dd3n_h4m$73r@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:

    > In calgary.general J. Clarke <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> Then you don't know how to configure a server.
    >
    > Actually, I do - And am unwilling to invest the time configuring
    > functionality I don't need.
    >
    > Which.
    > is.
    > the.
    > point.

    So instead you'll waste a lot more time configuring some kind of kluged up
    contraption.

    I'm sorry, but if you see configuring a server as being a more complex to
    time consuming task than kluging up some kind of USB-based monstrosity then
    you really do NOT know how to configure a server, no matter what you
    _believe_ to be the case.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  29. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    h1dd3n_h4m$73r@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote
    > J. Clarke <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote
    >> j4m4l_$1xp4ck@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote
    >>> Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote

    >>>> I think another PC for those 4 drives makes more sense.

    >>> Thus unnecessarily adding another OS,
    >>> and additional hardware for me to maintain.

    >> How much maintenance do you think a server _needs_?
    >> A good server is something that you turn on and forget about.

    > Gross oversimlification.

    Nope.

    > You're not an IT manager, are you?

    Hope you have a rather large towel handy for the egg on your face.

    > Any unnecessary complexity introduces more points of failure

    Thats what YOU are doing with multiple USB external enclosures.

    > Which inevitably increases the amount of time
    > I will spend maintaining it down the road.

    Thats what YOU are doing with multiple USB external enclosures.

    They are notorious for hassles over time compared with the MUCH
    more robust technology of a standalone server with the drives in that.

    And it makes a lot more sense to not be farting around with discarded
    80G drives at all and to replace them all with a 400G drive instead.
  30. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    Rod Speed wrote:
    > Thats what YOU are doing with multiple USB external enclosures.
    >

    Except if you had read what he is planning you would realize he isn't
    going to be dealing with multiple USB external enclosures.

    > They are notorious for hassles over time compared with the MUCH
    > more robust technology of a standalone server with the drives in that.

    Really? You base this on what? I certainly haven't seen it.

    > And it makes a lot more sense to not be farting around with discarded
    > 80G drives at all and to replace them all with a 400G drive instead.

    Yes, but why waste the 80GB drives if you have them? Sometimes the most
    educational/fun parts of computer technology is 'farting around' with
    things.

    --
    ====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+
  31. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    Dice wrote
    > Rod Speed wrote

    >>> Also as an interesting alternative BTW AoE (ATA over Ethernet) has been
    >>> getting quite a bit of press recently. It isn't in your price range I
    >>> suspect

    >> Corse it isnt.

    > I'm sorry I didn't realize you were Dan's personal accountant.

    Dont need to be. He clearly said that he's using discarded
    80G drives and wants to minimise the cost. That route doesnt.

    >>> (It really is designed more to be a datacenter solution),

    >> And is completely unsuitable for using some 80G discards.

    > Not really,

    Yes, really. The price is mad for 80G discarded drives.

    > AoE using some discarded 80GB drives might be completely
    > suitable for a technology enthusiast to play with.

    That aint what he said he wanted to do.

    >>> but the technology is interesting. http://www.coraid.com for more
    >>> information.

    >> A basic obsolete PC makes a lot more sense in his situation.

    > Maybe,

    No maybe about it.

    > but as I said, this was merely an interesting alternative.

    Completely unsuitable for what he wasnt to do, use some
    discarded 80G drives as a backup device, CHEAPLY.
  32. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    Dice wrote
    > Rod Speed wrote
    >> Dice wrote

    >>> Also as an interesting alternative BTW AoE (ATA over Ethernet) has been
    >>> getting quite a bit of press recently. It isn't in your price range I
    >>> suspect

    >> Corse it isnt.

    > I'm sorry I didn't realize you were Dan's personal accountant.

    Dont need to be. He clearly said that he's using discarded
    80G drives and wants to minimise the cost. It says that
    VERY unambiguously in the subject on that CHEAP.

    That route aint anything like CHEAP.

    >>> (It really is designed more to be a datacenter solution),

    >> And is completely unsuitable for using some 80G discards.

    > Not really,

    Yes, really. The price is mad for 80G discarded drives.

    And is nothing like CHEAP.

    > AoE using some discarded 80GB drives might be completely
    > suitable for a technology enthusiast to play with.

    That aint what he said he wanted, CHEAP.

    >>> but the technology is interesting. http://www.coraid.com for more
    >>> information.

    >> A basic obsolete PC makes a lot more sense in his situation.

    > Maybe,

    No maybe about it.

    > but as I said, this was merely an interesting alternative.

    Completely unsuitable for what he wasnt to do, use some
    discarded 80G drives as a backup device, CHEAPLY.
  33. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    h1dd3n_h4m$73r@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:
    > J. Clarke <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote

    >> Then you don't know how to configure a server.

    > Actually, I do - And am unwilling to invest
    > the time configuring functionality I don't need.

    You're gunna invest a lot more time farting
    around with USB enclosures, you watch.

    They are still rather immature technology.

    > Which.
    > is.
    > the.
    > point.

    Fraid.
    not.
  34. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    Dice wrote
    > Rod Speed wrote

    >>> Any unnecessary complexity introduces more points of failure

    >> Thats what YOU are doing with multiple USB external enclosures.

    > Except if you had read what he is planning you would realize he isn't going to
    > be dealing with multiple USB external enclosures.

    In practice he is, just putting them in a single housing.

    Electrically they are still separate, with a separate USB connection to each
    drive.

    >> They are notorious for hassles over time compared with the MUCH
    >> more robust technology of a standalone server with the drives in that.

    > Really? You base this on what? I certainly haven't seen it.

    You need to get out more. Have a read thru comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
    alone searching on USB and weep.

    >> And it makes a lot more sense to not be farting around with discarded
    >> 80G drives at all and to replace them all with a 400G drive instead.

    > Yes, but why waste the 80GB drives if you have them?

    Basically because its too much hassle to fart around with USB
    to IDE bridges for each drive and some way to house them.

    > Sometimes the most educational/fun parts of computer technology is 'farting
    > around' with things.

    He has said repeately that he isnt interested in wasting his time.

    If he does want to use the spare 80G drives, the only thing that makes any
    sense is a separate linux based server and do the RAID5 at the software level.

    But even that makes no real sense over say a 400G drive.

    It just a rather silly technowank.
  35. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > Even someone as stupid as you should be able to work out from the
    > thread that if he does want raid5, the collosal kludge of attempting it
    > with individual USB bridges per drive is a completely silly way to do that.

    Not at all, given "his" constraints.

    > And you dont need raid5 in a BACKUP POOL anyway.

    That's a judgement call, based on the value of the data.


    --
    ..............................................................................

    Just think of the tragedy of teaching children not to doubt.

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  36. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    h1dd3n_h4m$73r@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:

    > In calgary.general Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Even someone as stupid as you should be able to work out from the
    >> thread that if he does want raid5, the collosal kludge of attempting it
    >> with individual USB bridges per drive is a completely silly way to do
    >> that.
    >
    > Not at all, given "his" constraints.
    >
    >> And you dont need raid5 in a BACKUP POOL anyway.
    >
    > That's a judgement call, based on the value of the data.

    Actually, unless one needs to span two drives to get space for a single
    backup, for backup you're better off having multiple independent backup
    drives and removing them when not in use, so that you're using them in the
    same general way that tapes are used. Having an array online for backup
    makes it difficult to maintain isolated generations--something that kills
    one backup may kill them all.
    >
    >
    >
    >

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  37. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general J. Clarke <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote:

    > Actually, unless one needs to span two drives to get space for a single
    > backup, for backup you're better off having multiple independent backup
    > drives and removing them when not in use, so that you're using them in the
    > same general way that tapes are used. Having an array online for backup
    > makes it difficult to maintain isolated generations--something that kills
    > one backup may kill them all.

    Very valid point.

    --
    ..............................................................................

    "If you can't change the world Change yourself"
    -Matt Johnson

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  38. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general Rod Speed <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >> That's a judgement call, based on the value of the data.

    > Nope. That pool is ALREADY A BACKUP, stupid.

    That's obvious.

    You're a nasty one, arncha?


    --
    ..............................................................................

    "In June 1967, we again had a choice: The Egyptian Army concentrations in
    the Sinai approaches do not prove that Nasser was really about to attack
    us. We must be honest with ourselves. We decided to attack him"

    -Menachem Begin

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  39. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 16:48:47 GMT, p1mp_ju1c3@salmahayeksknockers.edu
    wrote:

    >I've got 4 80GB Drives that I'd like to redeploy in my house, but my
    >existing computers don't have any free IDE connexions, PCI slots, or drive
    >bays. I also don't want to create another complete PC in my house.
    >
    >I've seen some IDE-raid enclosures, but they are all prohibitively expensive.
    >
    >I've seen IDE->USB adapters cheap on Ebay (~$12 each). I'm thinking I could
    >grab 4 of these, connect my drives to a hub, and place them all in a small
    >PC tower, and connect the hub to one of my computers. It wouldn't be
    >pretty, but it would be fairly inexpensive.

    Given the capacity of the drives and the cheapness of new 300GB drives
    ($130 or so when you find a deal, even for new Seagates), you may end
    up paying more than it's worth for the USB adaptors or enclosures. On
    the other hand, you could use those for mostly-offline stuff. In that
    case, you could hand-unplug instead of trying a hub (a bottleneck, as
    someone mentioned). They may not have that much runtime left anyway.
    I know my Maxtors, vintage 2-3 years are croaking en masse.

    Also, RAID 0 won't make anything more reliable. You could RAID-5 the
    whole bunch of them. USB 2.0 won't keep up with the speed, but at
    least you'd have one large volume and you'd be able to tolerate one
    drive failure at a time.

    Having said all of that, I think Lacie may make some kind of Raid'd
    USB enclosure. They had an external 500GB box, and I don't know how
    else you'd get there.

    There's also a server-type box made by Buffalo. Way beyond the call
    for this type of thing, but it's a network connect, so it should be
    speedy.

    Interesting comments by others in this thread who recommend using an
    old PC as a pseudo-network-server. I was actually considering doing
    this with some old 120GBs and a couple retired 3Ware Raid controllers.
    You could probably get 6000-series 3Ware controllers on Ebay for cheap
    and hook them up as Raid 5. That is, if you have an extra computer
    and/or if you're already running a network.
  40. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    On Thu, 07 Jul 2005 16:35:54 GMT,
    h1dd3n_h4m$73r@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:


    >I already have several higher-capacity drives. I'm looking to create a
    >poor man's JBOD, and raid-5 it. 80GB extra is useless to me... but 240GB
    >or more can be used as a backup pool. As 80GB drives get cheaper and
    >cheaper, it will be pennies to extend my existing raid 5 set.

    Run the cable out to the garage so it doesn't make too much noise <g>
  41. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    cuddles@salmahayeksknockers.edu wrote:
    > Aspiring to make others feel worse isn't a healthy way to live life.

    I don't know why you are bothering Dan, Rod obviously doesn't know his
    ass from page eight, and is nothing more than a argumentative twit. He
    is just like Jon Pike, better to just ignore him, completely.

    --
    ====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+====+
  42. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    In calgary.general Dice <dicedontspamme@wilddice.org> wrote:

    > I don't know why you are bothering Dan, Rod obviously doesn't know his
    > ass from page eight, and is nothing more than a argumentative twit. He
    > is just like Jon Pike, better to just ignore him, completely.

    Dice... I just clued into who you are. Didn't know you were still around.

    BTW, I'd love to get together for a pint before the summer's out.


    --
    ..............................................................................

    Even if you do learn to speak correct English, whom are you going
    to speak it to?
    - Clarence Darrow

    ..............................................................................
    dswan@m3m3t1ccand1ru.com http://www.memeticcandiru.com
  43. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,calgary.general (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Jul 2005 07:45:56 +1000, "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    >Wrong. As always.

    Is that your sig, or just very succinct disclaimer?
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