Detecting drive temporarily offline

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going offline and back
online in one of the systems nearby. Problem is, I can't tell which
computer, drive, or power cable is the culprit. Event viewer has no
clues. Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?
9 answers Last reply
More about detecting drive temporarily offline
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Previously _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote:
    > I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going offline and back
    > online in one of the systems nearby. Problem is, I can't tell which
    > computer, drive, or power cable is the culprit. Event viewer has no
    > clues. Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?

    More likely a recalibration. No way to tell easily, since
    the disk does not announce this to the world.

    Arno
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    > I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going offline and back
    > online in one of the systems nearby. Problem is, I can't tell which
    > computer, drive, or power cable is the culprit. Event viewer has no
    > clues. Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?
    >

    Windows? Power Options | Turn off hard disks after x minutes/hours
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 22:41:20 -0400, "Peter" <peterfoxghost@yahoo.ca>
    wrote:

    >> I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going offline and back
    >> online in one of the systems nearby. Problem is, I can't tell which
    >> computer, drive, or power cable is the culprit. Event viewer has no
    >> clues. Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?
    >>
    >
    >Windows? Power Options | Turn off hard disks after x minutes/hours

    That's disabled. I wish that was it.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On 14 Jul 2005 21:52:48 GMT, Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote:

    >Previously _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote:
    >> I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going offline and back
    >> online in one of the systems nearby. Problem is, I can't tell which
    >> computer, drive, or power cable is the culprit. Event viewer has no
    >> clues. Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?
    >
    >More likely a recalibration. No way to tell easily, since
    >the disk does not announce this to the world.
    >
    >Arno

    In 2003 I was using WD drives. After numerous spin-downs on RAID
    systems they finally had to announce a BIOS problems. Wasn't easy
    for them, evidently.

    That particular sound gets my attention now. In the case of the WD,
    the errors would turn up in the event cue as delayed writes or
    complete write fails. It seems like some temporary polling mechanism
    could detect if that's happening. It would probably turn up within a
    day or so.

    Maybe I have to get up to speed on how to access drives' SMART data.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote:

    > I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going
    > offline and back online in one of the systems nearby.
    > Problem is, I can't tell which computer, drive, or power
    > cable is the culprit. Event viewer has no clues.

    Likely because the drive itself is doing it.

    > Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?

    It might show up on the Everest SMART data.

    Whether it does or not depends on the drive and
    whether it includes the spindown in the SMART data.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Previously _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote:
    > On 14 Jul 2005 21:52:48 GMT, Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote:

    >>Previously _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote:
    >>> I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going offline and back
    >>> online in one of the systems nearby. Problem is, I can't tell which
    >>> computer, drive, or power cable is the culprit. Event viewer has no
    >>> clues. Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?
    >>
    >>More likely a recalibration. No way to tell easily, since
    >>the disk does not announce this to the world.
    >>
    >>Arno

    > In 2003 I was using WD drives. After numerous spin-downs on RAID
    > systems they finally had to announce a BIOS problems. Wasn't easy
    > for them, evidently.

    > That particular sound gets my attention now. In the case of the WD,
    > the errors would turn up in the event cue as delayed writes or
    > complete write fails. It seems like some temporary polling mechanism
    > could detect if that's happening. It would probably turn up within a
    > day or so.

    > Maybe I have to get up to speed on how to access drives' SMART data.

    Hmm. If it is this type of problem, SMART might not help, since it will
    likely not be accessible during the spin-down as well. I think
    you may have to detect the disk being unresponsive. How to do that
    depends on your OS and the disk load.

    On the other hand the Start_Stop_Count in SMART may show increases
    that should not be there. This you can poll with some sort of
    cron-job or polling daemon. Easiest way to get SMART data for
    further processing is with the commandline smartmontools. You
    may even be able to configure smartd (part of the smartmontools) to
    do this monitoring for you.

    Arno
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Peter" <peterfoxghost@yahoo.ca> wrote in message news:mnFBe.10703$6e3.668101@news20.bellglobal.com
    > > I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going offline and back
    > > online in one of the systems nearby. Problem is, I can't tell which
    > > computer, drive, or power cable is the culprit. Event viewer has no
    > > clues. Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?
    > >
    >
    > Windows? Power Options | Turn off hard disks after x minutes/hours

    What chance of a drive timing out after several minutes to a hour of in-
    activity and then be immediately hit by a request that fires it up again?
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote:
    > On 14 Jul 2005 21:52:48 GMT, Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Previously _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote:
    >>> I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going offline and back
    >>> online in one of the systems nearby. Problem is, I can't tell which
    >>> computer, drive, or power cable is the culprit. Event viewer has no
    >>> clues. Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?
    >>
    >> More likely a recalibration. No way to tell easily, since
    >> the disk does not announce this to the world.
    >>
    >> Arno
    >
    > In 2003 I was using WD drives. After numerous spin-downs on RAID
    > systems they finally had to announce a BIOS problems. Wasn't easy
    > for them, evidently.
    >
    > That particular sound gets my attention now. In the case of the WD,
    > the errors would turn up in the event cue as delayed writes or
    > complete write fails. It seems like some temporary polling mechanism
    > could detect if that's happening. It would probably turn up within a
    > day or so.
    >
    > Maybe I have to get up to speed on how to access drives' SMART data.

    Just use Everest.
    http://www.lavalys.com/products/overview.php?pid=1&lang=en
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote
    > _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote
    >> Arno Wagner <me@privacy.net> wrote
    >>> _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote

    >>>> I occasionally hear a drive sound like it's going offline and back
    >>>> online in one of the systems nearby. Problem is, I can't tell which
    >>>> computer, drive, or power cable is the culprit. Event viewer has
    >>>> no clues. Is there a monitoring utility that will catch this?

    >>> More likely a recalibration. No way to tell easily, since
    >>> the disk does not announce this to the world.

    >> In 2003 I was using WD drives. After numerous spin-downs
    >> on RAID systems they finally had to announce a BIOS
    >> problems. Wasn't easy for them, evidently.

    >> That particular sound gets my attention now. In the case
    >> of the WD, the errors would turn up in the event cue as
    >> delayed writes or complete write fails. It seems like some
    >> temporary polling mechanism could detect if that's happening.
    >> It would probably turn up within a day or so.

    >> Maybe I have to get up to speed on how to access drives' SMART data.

    > Hmm. If it is this type of problem, SMART might not help, since
    > it will likely not be accessible during the spin-down as well.

    That shouldnt be a problem because the spin down appears to
    be only a short term spindown and if it isnt, access to the SMART
    data should spin it up again, and even if it doesnt, you will know which
    drive has spun down because the SMART data wont be available.

    > I think you may have to detect the disk being unresponsive.
    > How to do that depends on your OS and the disk load.

    Nope, just the SMART data not being available is all the info you need.

    > On the other hand the Start_Stop_Count in SMART may show
    > increases that should not be there. This you can poll with some
    > sort of cron-job or polling daemon. Easiest way to get SMART
    > data for further processing is with the commandline smartmontools.
    > You may even be able to configure smartd (part of the
    > smartmontools) to do this monitoring for you.
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