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Further Advice Sought

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August 13, 2005 11:17:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

To All Cognoscenti,

In my recent message on the subject "Expert Advice Sought" I reported that
the local outfit that had built my computer for me removed the tiny fan from
the slide-out cage containing the HDD, and that the HDD subsequently failed.
Further checking by me has revealed that the "Health Status" of my computer,
as reported by the CMOS Setup Utility, shows that the CPU Warning
Temperature and the CPU Fan Fail Warning were both disabled. Please indicate
to me any reasons why a seller of computers would want to disable these
warnings and remove the cooling fan from the slide-out cage containing a
HDD. What action do you advise me to take?

The CMOS Setup Utility shows the following values:

Current System Temperature 40 C
Current CPU Temperature 64 C
Current CPU Fan Speed 3240 RPM

Are these values normal?

Your guidance to this non-technical computer user would be much appreciated.

Andy

More about : advice sought

Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 13, 2005 2:41:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

In article <x8hLe.174748$HI.65829@edtnps84>, kanadaiy@telus.net says...
> To All Cognoscenti,
>
> In my recent message on the subject "Expert Advice Sought" I reported that
> the local outfit that had built my computer for me removed the tiny fan from
> the slide-out cage containing the HDD, and that the HDD subsequently failed.
> Further checking by me has revealed that the "Health Status" of my computer,
> as reported by the CMOS Setup Utility, shows that the CPU Warning
> Temperature and the CPU Fan Fail Warning were both disabled. Please indicate
> to me any reasons why a seller of computers would want to disable these
> warnings and remove the cooling fan from the slide-out cage containing a
> HDD. What action do you advise me to take?

warnings i would disable probably to a often beeping machine , going in
the risk of overheating , but afterwards telling the customer some lies
about reasons . etc. ....

return this machine get your money back and look for a reasonable seller
..

>
> The CMOS Setup Utility shows the following values:
>
> Current System Temperature 40 C
> Current CPU Temperature 64 C
> Current CPU Fan Speed 3240 RPM
>
> Are these values normal?
>

depends if you are at northern russia or the mojave , but i wouldn't
accept this temperatures as normal working temp.

i have now in southern-germany :

outdoors ~ 21 C°
systemcase 24 C°
cpu 29 C°
mainboard 26 C°


--
gruss , wolfgang
---<--@
gravity still lives
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 13, 2005 2:41:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

wolfgang schneider wrote:
> In article <x8hLe.174748$HI.65829@edtnps84>, kanadaiy@telus.net
>>
>> The CMOS Setup Utility shows the following values:
>>
>> Current System Temperature 40 C
>> Current CPU Temperature 64 C
>> Current CPU Fan Speed 3240 RPM
>>
>> Are these values normal?
> depends if you are at northern russia or the mojave , but i wouldn't
> accept this temperatures as normal working temp.

They're high (the CPU especially), but within working range if the PC
has been on a while.

> i have now in southern-germany :
>
> outdoors ~ 21 C°
> systemcase 24 C°
> cpu 29 C°
> mainboard 26 C°

Those are really low... very low - has the system only just been turned on
?

Normal real world figures for a healthy pc after its been used for an hour
are:

mainboard/system 30-50
cpu 40-70
hdd 30-50

Alot depends on the barnd of CPU, motherbaord, HDD and ambient temp,
--
Mike
Related resources
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 13, 2005 8:21:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

In article <NUjLe.88055$G8.57325@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk>,
mike@redrobe.net says...
>
> > i have now in southern-germany :
> >
> > outdoors ~ 21 C°
> > systemcase 24 C°
> > cpu 29 C°
> > mainboard 26 C°
>
> Those are really low... very low - has the system only just been turned on
> ?

this selfbuild one runs since a few hours . it's a k6 III+ 450@600 with
heatpipe-cooler on a tyan 1592s in a modified case with 3 additional
fans . all cd and hdd are in external scsi-towers .

>
> Normal real world figures for a healthy pc after its been used for an hour
> are:
>
> mainboard/system 30-50
> cpu 40-70
> hdd 30-50

i wouldn't like to have any component getting above 40 C° .

>
> Alot depends on the barnd of CPU, motherbaord, HDD and ambient temp,

indeed !

> --
> Mike
>
>
>
>

--
gruss , wolfgang
---<--@
gravity still lives
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 14, 2005 12:45:35 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Andy <kanadaiy@telus.net> wrote

> To All Cognoscenti,

I'm still not a wog.

> In my recent message on the subject "Expert Advice Sought" I reported
> that the local outfit that had built my computer for me removed the
> tiny fan from the slide-out cage containing the HDD, and that the HDD
> subsequently failed. Further checking by me has revealed that the
> "Health Status" of my computer, as reported by the CMOS Setup
> Utility, shows that the CPU Warning Temperature and the CPU Fan Fail
> Warning were both disabled. Please indicate to me any reasons why a
> seller of computers would want to disable these warnings

They often default to disabled.

> and remove the cooling fan from the slide-out cage containing a HDD.

It may not have ever had the fan fitted, the cheapest version often doesnt.

> What action do you advise me to take?

Measure the SMART temperature of the drive using Everest
and get a new removable drive carrier with a decent fan if
the temperature is higher than 45 C in the summer.

> The CMOS Setup Utility shows the following values:

> Current System Temperature 40 C
> Current CPU Temperature 64 C
> Current CPU Fan Speed 3240 RPM

> Are these values normal?

Yes, with an Intel Prescott cpu or an AMD.

> Your guidance to this non-technical computer user would be much appreciated.
August 14, 2005 12:53:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Hi Rod,

"Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:3m61aiF15cmijU1@individual.net...
> Andy <kanadaiy@telus.net> wrote
>
>> To All Cognoscenti,
>
> I'm still not a wog.
>
>> In my recent message on the subject "Expert Advice Sought" I reported
>> that the local outfit that had built my computer for me removed the
>> tiny fan from the slide-out cage containing the HDD, and that the HDD
>> subsequently failed. Further checking by me has revealed that the
>> "Health Status" of my computer, as reported by the CMOS Setup
>> Utility, shows that the CPU Warning Temperature and the CPU Fan Fail
>> Warning were both disabled. Please indicate to me any reasons why a
>> seller of computers would want to disable these warnings
>
> They often default to disabled.

Shouldn't the builder enable them before delivering the machine?

>
>> and remove the cooling fan from the slide-out cage containing a HDD.
>
> It may not have ever had the fan fitted, the cheapest version often
> doesnt.
>

According to the builder, he removed the fan.

>> What action do you advise me to take?
>
> Measure the SMART temperature of the drive using Everest
> and get a new removable drive carrier with a decent fan if
> the temperature is higher than 45 C in the summer.

The replacement drive will go into the case and not into a slide-out cage.
I've already got Everest, but I have to rebuild my system first.

>
>> The CMOS Setup Utility shows the following values:
>
>> Current System Temperature 40 C
>> Current CPU Temperature 64 C
>> Current CPU Fan Speed 3240 RPM
>
>> Are these values normal?
>
> Yes, with an Intel Prescott cpu or an AMD.

My CPU is an AMD XP2600+ (2.08 MGHz).

>
>> Your guidance to this non-technical computer user would be much
>> appreciated.
>
>
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 15, 2005 6:42:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Sat, 13 Aug 2005 20:45:35 +1000, in
comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage , "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com>
in <3m61aiF15cmijU1@individual.net> wrote:

>Andy <kanadaiy@telus.net> wrote
>
>> To All Cognoscenti,
>
>I'm still not a wog.
>
>> In my recent message on the subject "Expert Advice Sought" I reported
>> that the local outfit that had built my computer for me removed the
>> tiny fan from the slide-out cage containing the HDD, and that the HDD
>> subsequently failed. Further checking by me has revealed that the
>> "Health Status" of my computer, as reported by the CMOS Setup
>> Utility, shows that the CPU Warning Temperature and the CPU Fan Fail
>> Warning were both disabled. Please indicate to me any reasons why a
>> seller of computers would want to disable these warnings
>
>They often default to disabled.
>
>> and remove the cooling fan from the slide-out cage containing a HDD.
>
>It may not have ever had the fan fitted, the cheapest version often doesnt.
>
>> What action do you advise me to take?
>
>Measure the SMART temperature of the drive using Everest
>and get a new removable drive carrier with a decent fan if
>the temperature is higher than 45 C in the summer.

I have a Dell Optiplex 270, small form factor, and Everest does not
give me any temperature readings, not for the drive, not under sensor.
Am I doing something wrong here?


--
Matt Silberstein

Well ya see, Norm, it's like this. A herd of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members. In much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, as we know, kills brain cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and more efficient machine. That's why you always feel smarter after a few beers.

Cliff on Cheers
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 16, 2005 8:51:08 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Matt Silberstein <RemoveThisPrefixmatts2nospam@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
> On Sat, 13 Aug 2005 20:45:35 +1000, in
> comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage , "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com>
> in <3m61aiF15cmijU1@individual.net> wrote:
>
>> Andy <kanadaiy@telus.net> wrote
>>
>>> To All Cognoscenti,
>>
>> I'm still not a wog.
>>
>>> In my recent message on the subject "Expert Advice Sought" I
>>> reported that the local outfit that had built my computer for me
>>> removed the tiny fan from the slide-out cage containing the HDD,
>>> and that the HDD subsequently failed. Further checking by me has
>>> revealed that the "Health Status" of my computer, as reported by
>>> the CMOS Setup Utility, shows that the CPU Warning Temperature and
>>> the CPU Fan Fail Warning were both disabled. Please indicate to me
>>> any reasons why a seller of computers would want to disable these
>>> warnings
>>
>> They often default to disabled.
>>
>>> and remove the cooling fan from the slide-out cage containing a HDD.
>>
>> It may not have ever had the fan fitted, the cheapest version often
>> doesnt.
>>
>>> What action do you advise me to take?
>>
>> Measure the SMART temperature of the drive using Everest
>> and get a new removable drive carrier with a decent fan if
>> the temperature is higher than 45 C in the summer.
>
> I have a Dell Optiplex 270, small form factor, and Everest does not
> give me any temperature readings, not for the drive, not under sensor.
> Am I doing something wrong here?

Nar, most likely you have one of the drives that was very late to have
the drive temperature in the SMART data. The most common drives
like that were the WDs, WD was very later with drive temperature in
the SMART data, last of the mainstream drive manufacturers.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 16, 2005 8:51:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 04:51:08 +1000, in
comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage , "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com>
in <3mc6guF168h4mU1@individual.net> wrote:

>Matt Silberstein <RemoveThisPrefixmatts2nospam@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
>> On Sat, 13 Aug 2005 20:45:35 +1000, in
>> comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage , "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com>
>> in <3m61aiF15cmijU1@individual.net> wrote:
>>
>>> Andy <kanadaiy@telus.net> wrote
>>>
>>>> To All Cognoscenti,
>>>
>>> I'm still not a wog.
>>>
>>>> In my recent message on the subject "Expert Advice Sought" I
>>>> reported that the local outfit that had built my computer for me
>>>> removed the tiny fan from the slide-out cage containing the HDD,
>>>> and that the HDD subsequently failed. Further checking by me has
>>>> revealed that the "Health Status" of my computer, as reported by
>>>> the CMOS Setup Utility, shows that the CPU Warning Temperature and
>>>> the CPU Fan Fail Warning were both disabled. Please indicate to me
>>>> any reasons why a seller of computers would want to disable these
>>>> warnings
>>>
>>> They often default to disabled.
>>>
>>>> and remove the cooling fan from the slide-out cage containing a HDD.
>>>
>>> It may not have ever had the fan fitted, the cheapest version often
>>> doesnt.
>>>
>>>> What action do you advise me to take?
>>>
>>> Measure the SMART temperature of the drive using Everest
>>> and get a new removable drive carrier with a decent fan if
>>> the temperature is higher than 45 C in the summer.
>>
>> I have a Dell Optiplex 270, small form factor, and Everest does not
>> give me any temperature readings, not for the drive, not under sensor.
>> Am I doing something wrong here?
>
>Nar, most likely you have one of the drives that was very late to have
>the drive temperature in the SMART data. The most common drives
>like that were the WDs, WD was very later with drive temperature in
>the SMART data, last of the mainstream drive manufacturers.
>
Yeah. Darm.

Thanks.

--
Matt Silberstein

Well ya see, Norm, it's like this. A herd of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members. In much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, as we know, kills brain cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and more efficient machine. That's why you always feel smarter after a few beers.

Cliff on Cheers
!