Low-level reformat ?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

Before 'oogling through the layers of info out there could any
regulars here describe relevant key words.

Like hidden sectors, file system details and alternate data streams.

Or is there a simpler explanation re how this is done

http://www.adobe.com/activation/faq.html

Do I have to reactivate if I reformat my hard drive?

As long as you don't perform a "low-level" reformat of your hard
drive, you will not be required to reactivate your Adobe software.
Please note that utilities (provided by the operating system vendor)
typically used for reformatting the hard drive do not perform a
"low-level" reformat.

TIA
6 answers Last reply
More about level reformat
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "Stop 0x000001E" <Stop0x000001E@the-edge.org> wrote in message
    news:f5ecg19t6d7g46ohl82i9f9u2hv03ab2qf@4ax.com...
    > Before 'oogling through the layers of info out there could any
    > regulars here describe relevant key words.
    >
    > Like hidden sectors, file system details and alternate data streams.
    Hunh?
    >
    > Or is there a simpler explanation re how this is done
    How what is done?
    >
    > http://www.adobe.com/activation/faq.html
    >
    > Do I have to reactivate if I reformat my hard drive?

    Yes. But, it's not directly related to reformating. The reason you have to
    reactivate is because freshly installed software doesn't know it's been
    activated.
    >
    > As long as you don't perform a "low-level" reformat of your hard
    > drive, you will not be required to reactivate your Adobe software.
    > Please note that utilities (provided by the operating system vendor)
    > typically used for reformatting the hard drive do not perform a
    > "low-level" reformat.
    >
    > TIA
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On Sat, 20 Aug 2005 19:14:10 GMT, "fj" <jelenko@att.net> wrote:

    >
    >"Stop 0x000001E" <Stop0x000001E@the-edge.org> wrote in message
    >news:f5ecg19t6d7g46ohl82i9f9u2hv03ab2qf@4ax.com...
    >> Before 'oogling through the layers of info out there could any
    >> regulars here describe relevant key words.
    >>
    >> Like hidden sectors, file system details and alternate data streams.
    >Hunh?
    >>
    >> Or is there a simpler explanation re how this is done
    >How what is done?
    >>
    >> http://www.adobe.com/activation/faq.html
    >>
    >> Do I have to reactivate if I reformat my hard drive?
    >
    >Yes. But, it's not directly related to reformating. The reason you have to
    >reactivate is because freshly installed software doesn't know it's been
    >activated.
    >>
    >> As long as you don't perform a "low-level" reformat of your hard
    >> drive, you will not be required to reactivate your Adobe software.
    >> Please note that utilities (provided by the operating system vendor)
    >> typically used for reformatting the hard drive do not perform a
    >> "low-level" reformat.
    >>
    >> TIA
    >

    How confused are you?
    Nice of you to respond but your opinion on reactivation differs from
    the adobe advice.

    Are you able to comprehend the issue ?

    You say yes , they say no !

    regards
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 19:53:36 GMT, Stop 0x000001E
    <Stop0x000001E@the-edge.org> wrote:

    >Before 'oogling through the layers of info out there could any
    >regulars here describe relevant key words.
    >
    >Like hidden sectors, file system details and alternate data streams.
    >
    >Or is there a simpler explanation re how this is done
    >
    >http://www.adobe.com/activation/faq.html

    Sorry, I don't know how the activation code is stored.

    >Do I have to reactivate if I reformat my hard drive?
    >
    >As long as you don't perform a "low-level" reformat of your hard
    >drive, you will not be required to reactivate your Adobe software.
    >Please note that utilities (provided by the operating system vendor)
    >typically used for reformatting the hard drive do not perform a
    >"low-level" reformat.
    >
    >TIA

    IF the Adobe statement is accurate and complete, then normal
    reformatting should not require you to reactivate. Low-level
    formatting is rarely done, and is usually a bad idea anyway.

    The statement somewhat contradicts other parts of the faq: The faq
    says "In complex situations where the system is being upgraded,
    reactivation is required." It also seems to imply that uninstalling
    the software without transferring activation requires you to
    reactivate if you later reinstall the software on the same computer.

    Russell May
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    Russell May <russmay@toastNotthis.net> wrote
    > Stop 0x000001E <Stop0x000001E@the-edge.org> wrote

    >> Before 'oogling through the layers of info out there
    >> could any regulars here describe relevant key words.

    >> Like hidden sectors, file system details and alternate data streams.

    >> Or is there a simpler explanation re how this is done

    >> http://www.adobe.com/activation/faq.html

    > Sorry, I don't know how the activation code is stored.

    >> Do I have to reactivate if I reformat my hard drive?

    >> As long as you don't perform a "low-level" reformat of your hard
    >> drive, you will not be required to reactivate your Adobe software.
    >> Please note that utilities (provided by the operating system vendor)
    >> typically used for reformatting the hard drive do not perform a
    >> "low-level" reformat.

    > IF the Adobe statement is accurate and complete, then
    > normal reformatting should not require you to reactivate.

    > Low-level formatting is rarely done, and is usually a bad idea anyway.

    Nope, modern IDE drives just write zeros thru all the sectors.

    Nothing 'bad idea' about doing that in that situation.

    > The statement somewhat contradicts other parts of the faq:
    > The faq says "In complex situations where the system is being
    > upgraded, reactivation is required." It also seems to imply that
    > uninstalling the software without transferring activation requires you
    > to reactivate if you later reinstall the software on the same computer.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    On Wed, 24 Aug 2005 13:55:46 +1000, "Rod Speed" <rod_speed@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    >Russell May <russmay@toastNotthis.net> wrote
    >> Stop 0x000001E <Stop0x000001E@the-edge.org> wrote
    >
    >>> Before 'oogling through the layers of info out there
    >>> could any regulars here describe relevant key words.
    >
    >>> Like hidden sectors, file system details and alternate data streams.
    >
    >>> Or is there a simpler explanation re how this is done
    >
    >>> http://www.adobe.com/activation/faq.html
    >
    >> Sorry, I don't know how the activation code is stored.
    >
    >>> Do I have to reactivate if I reformat my hard drive?
    >
    >>> As long as you don't perform a "low-level" reformat of your hard
    >>> drive, you will not be required to reactivate your Adobe software.
    >>> Please note that utilities (provided by the operating system vendor)
    >>> typically used for reformatting the hard drive do not perform a
    >>> "low-level" reformat.
    >
    >> IF the Adobe statement is accurate and complete, then
    >> normal reformatting should not require you to reactivate.
    >
    >> Low-level formatting is rarely done, and is usually a bad idea anyway.
    >
    >Nope, modern IDE drives just write zeros thru all the sectors.
    >
    >Nothing 'bad idea' about doing that in that situation.
    >
    >> The statement somewhat contradicts other parts of the faq:
    >> The faq says "In complex situations where the system is being
    >> upgraded, reactivation is required." It also seems to imply that
    >> uninstalling the software without transferring activation requires you
    >> to reactivate if you later reinstall the software on the same computer.

    Has "low-level" formatting has changed since the early days of IDE
    drives? If I recall correctly the original low-level formatting
    programs for IDE drives erased the factory error map and replaced it
    with one which was less likely to be complete.

    Regardless of that, I have read that a drive which is unreliable
    enough to require a low-level format will probably remain unreliable:
    It's better to scrap the drive and get a new one.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage (More info?)

    "fj" <jelenko@att.net> wrote in message news:6iLNe.642203$cg1.379109@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net
    > "Stop 0x000001E" <Stop0x000001E@the-edge.org> wrote in message news:f5ecg19t6d7g46ohl82i9f9u2hv03ab2qf@4ax.com...
    > > Before 'oogling through the layers of info out there could any
    > > regulars here describe relevant key words.
    > >
    > > Like hidden sectors, file system details and alternate data streams. Huh?
    > >
    > > Or is there a simpler explanation re how this is done
    >
    > How what is done?
    >
    > >
    > > http://www.adobe.com/activation/faq.html
    > >
    > > Do I have to reactivate if I reformat my hard drive?
    >
    > Yes. But, it's not directly related to reformating. The reason you have to
    > reactivate is because freshly installed software doesn't know it's been
    > activated.

    Nonsense.
    Plenty of removed software knows it has been installed before.

    > >
    > > As long as you don't perform a "low-level" reformat of your hard
    > > drive, you will not be required to reactivate your Adobe software.
    > > Please note that utilities (provided by the operating system vendor)
    > > typically used for reformatting the hard drive do not perform a
    > > "low-level" reformat.
    > >
    > > TIA
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