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Researchers Say Molybdenite Could Replace Silicon in Chips

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December 25, 2011 11:12:50 PM

what happened to Graphene,was met with the silicon replacement, and of this new stuff have the same heat qualities that Graphene has, it be nice to see the chips going to 50 GHz+
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December 25, 2011 11:21:50 PM

i came
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December 25, 2011 11:22:14 PM

I was also thinking Graphene. Apparently, this is more efficient than Graphene. however, will this still be able to be used even under 16 nm nodes considering MoS2 is larger than SiO2 or even xC6,( Graphene)?
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December 25, 2011 11:44:04 PM

Researchers are wrong a lot.
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December 25, 2011 11:46:25 PM

According to Yu-Ming Lin from IBM Research:

There is an important distinction between the graphene transistors that we demonstrated, and the transistors used in a CPU. Unlike silicon, ‘graphene does not have an energy gap, and therefore, graphene cannot be “switched off,” resulting in a small on/off ratio.

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No off state means more energy leakage and therefore more heat. It also makes it more difficult to figure out the state of a transistor, and if IBM is correct, too difficult for it to be a viable solution when graphene is used as the base material.
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December 25, 2011 11:56:08 PM

graphene is also extremely expensive, but that is changing quickly and may no longer be true as new industrial processes are introduced
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December 26, 2011 12:27:31 AM

Its all about money. The cheapest material wins...
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December 26, 2011 1:03:39 AM

nikorrIts all about money. The cheapest material wins...


It will be expensive at first. When it takes off it will get cheaper...
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Anonymous
December 26, 2011 1:18:53 AM

nikorrIts all about money. The cheapest material wins...


"strawberry flavored cranberries"
Exactly... they even do it in your snack bars.
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December 26, 2011 1:21:09 AM

i think graphene is good for high frequency analog signals
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December 26, 2011 2:17:50 AM

I thought intel was working on light to replace silicon :/ 
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December 26, 2011 3:15:04 AM

amuffinI thought intel was working on light to replace silicon

Well they are, but the whole processor cannot be light. Each 'light transistor' must have a diode and a receiver. Those millions of leds and receivers will take a fair amount of material to control and route power to each one.
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December 26, 2011 3:15:42 AM

I think the silicon chip would need to replaced by artificial diamonds in 10 years or after because they 10x or more conductive than the current super conductors that are used in chips. By using them the chips would have super efficient and very small in size so will be powerful though they will have a hugh price point.
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December 26, 2011 8:28:08 AM

then we can have performance like that of i7-3960k in a mobile phone like device
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December 26, 2011 1:29:27 PM

theuniquegamerI think the silicon chip would need to replaced by artificial diamonds in 10 years or after because they 10x or more conductive than the current super conductors that are used in chips. By using them the chips would have super efficient and very small in size so will be powerful though they will have a hugh price point.


I can see the new commercial from "de Beers"; a Diamond is a computer geeks best friend. :-)
And iPods will be sold exclusively thru "Jared" of course.
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December 26, 2011 2:40:07 PM

When they start talking about transistors in terms of only a handful of molecules in size, I begin to wonder about what new and quirky quantum physics is going to come into play.
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December 26, 2011 2:59:44 PM

Well, the industry had the means to switch over to either graphene, diamonds, or even 'hybrids' of all those materials over a decade ago.
Graphene was actually first 'thought' (at least by mainstream views) as a silicon replacement.

Realistically, we could have had quantum computers by now in the market.
Consumer grade tech is about 5 to 6 decades behind 'actual' technological progress.
Majority of these 'inventions' are just yet another way to keep recycling same or similar computing methods without having to switch to an entirely new system (one of the issues why they don't want to do it is because software development is abysmal... so even if they put out a quantum computer out into the open today -which they probably can, writing the software for it is a different story).

All of this is yet another method to gear up more money. Nothing else.
Otherwise, we'd be long past this level.
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December 26, 2011 5:03:24 PM

I have not doubt that scientists will eventually discover a suitable replacement for silicon.
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December 26, 2011 5:59:59 PM

What's the difference between molybdenum and molybdenite? Molybdenum is in my engine oil as an emergency anti-wear additive (graphite) and it's in my multivitamin apparently too.
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December 26, 2011 10:12:34 PM

deksmanWell, the industry had the means to switch over to either graphene, diamonds, or even 'hybrids' of all those materials over a decade ago.Graphene was actually first 'thought' (at least by mainstream views) as a silicon replacement.Realistically, we could have had quantum computers by now in the market.Consumer grade tech is about 5 to 6 decades behind 'actual' technological progress.Majority of these 'inventions' are just yet another way to keep recycling same or similar computing methods without having to switch to an entirely new system (one of the issues why they don't want to do it is because software development is abysmal... so even if they put out a quantum computer out into the open today -which they probably can, writing the software for it is a different story).All of this is yet another method to gear up more money. Nothing else.Otherwise, we'd be long past this level.

Very insightful observation, my friend. +1
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December 26, 2011 10:13:14 PM

danwat1234What's the difference between molybdenum and molybdenite? Molybdenum is in my engine oil as an emergency anti-wear additive (graphite) and it's in my multivitamin apparently too.

Molybdenum is chemical element and molybdenite is chemical compound that is made of molybdenum.
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Anonymous
December 27, 2011 1:58:05 AM

"I have not doubt that scientists will eventually discover a suitable replacement for silicon."

Ahh thanks for that. Let me know when you more less doubt and maybe more or possibly some.
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December 27, 2011 4:33:28 AM

five to six decades? So at the beginning of the Vietnam war, they had processors as good as my quad core phenom ii in the military? I think not, but then again many astronauts attest to the fact we are and have been visited by other alien races for many decades now, and surely they would of had more advanced tech than the public has today. So in that regard, you might be correct.
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December 27, 2011 3:20:24 PM

deksman... so even if they put out a quantum computer out into the open today -which they probably can, writing the software for it is a different story).


I agree! I mean I get a headache just thinking of the implication of each condition in a CASE statement being true all at once...
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Anonymous
December 27, 2011 4:05:46 PM

molly mines in North Western Quebec - even Thorium deposits there - ignored since the 40's due to lack of stable markets, well worth another look now-a-days!
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!