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Quick logging of video clips ?

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Anonymous
March 30, 2004 11:18:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I have about 8 hours of video clips of lacrosse games.
I need to watch them and quickly razor blade out usable short
moments and store them somewhere to compile a library of clips
preferably with recognizable names to reassemble later in a collage.
Could somebody please suggest some alternatives on how to do this
quickly and what software? Maybe some simple avi or mpeg2 trimmer
shareware utility or ??
Note that I have Studio 8, Ulead Video Studio (?), MyDVD and
several other under $100 editors. But none of them seem to be able to
let you watch a lengthy tape and trim short sections and just store
them back into archive separately. Instead, you can pull video scenes
down onto a timeline and trim, but after you have done several, you
store them ALL as a Project all comingled and with one name.
I am trying to compile from the lengthy tapes into a library short
nameable segments and only THEN pull them into a single project.
For example I want to pull out all usable "Funny Moments" clips and
put them in one location. Then I want to pull out all "Face-off"
clips and do likewise, then all "Referee screw-ups", etc.- you get the
idea.
There are work arounds, such as in Studio 8 pulling the whole video
into the Project timeline, trimming to the first desired segment, then
saving it as a Project. This is just too klunky and time consuming
since it requires opening a new Project to continue and not knowing
where you left off, and pulling the whole video in again.
Surely there must be some simple utility to simply razor blade out
and store off chunks continuously from a larger file ?
I know Adobe Premier has some sort of "Log Tab" function that
sounds like you can do this. I will spring for Premier or some other
higher cost package like Vegas or Avid Express or Final Cut or any
lower cost editor if I have to just to do this one function quickly,
but in every other respect Studio 8 and the other simpler editors
serves my needs just fine.
Any solution(s) would be much appreciated since I've got to throw
this Lacrosse DVD together in a month as a fund raiser.
THANKS for ANY help !!!!!

Bob
Anonymous
March 31, 2004 11:54:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Both Ulead video editing applications feature "batch capturing" for DV
..avi captures from digital camcorders.

This means one can capture precise segments by marking specific "in"
and "out" points corresponding to the timecode on the Mini DV tape.

Jerry Jones
http://www.jonesgroup.net

Ulead VIDEOSTUDIO 7.0:

http://www.ulead.com/vs/runme.htm

Ulead MEDIASTUDIO PRO 7.0

http://www.ulead.com/msp/runme.htm

bcarwell@us.ibm.com (bob carwell) wrote:

in message news:<65e33f7.0403300718.604bae62@posting.google.com>...
> I have about 8 hours of video clips of lacrosse games.
> I need to watch them and quickly razor blade out usable short
> moments and store them somewhere to compile a library of clips
> preferably with recognizable names to reassemble later in a collage.
> Could somebody please suggest some alternatives on how to do this
> quickly and what software? Maybe some simple avi or mpeg2 trimmer
> shareware utility or ??
> Note that I have Studio 8, Ulead Video Studio (?), MyDVD and
> several other under $100 editors. But none of them seem to be able to
> let you watch a lengthy tape and trim short sections and just store
> them back into archive separately. Instead, you can pull video scenes
> down onto a timeline and trim, but after you have done several, you
> store them ALL as a Project all comingled and with one name.
> I am trying to compile from the lengthy tapes into a library short
> nameable segments and only THEN pull them into a single project.
> For example I want to pull out all usable "Funny Moments" clips and
> put them in one location. Then I want to pull out all "Face-off"
> clips and do likewise, then all "Referee screw-ups", etc.- you get the
> idea.
> There are work arounds, such as in Studio 8 pulling the whole video
> into the Project timeline, trimming to the first desired segment, then
> saving it as a Project. This is just too klunky and time consuming
> since it requires opening a new Project to continue and not knowing
> where you left off, and pulling the whole video in again.
> Surely there must be some simple utility to simply razor blade out
> and store off chunks continuously from a larger file ?
> I know Adobe Premier has some sort of "Log Tab" function that
> sounds like you can do this. I will spring for Premier or some other
> higher cost package like Vegas or Avid Express or Final Cut or any
> lower cost editor if I have to just to do this one function quickly,
> but in every other respect Studio 8 and the other simpler editors
> serves my needs just fine.
> Any solution(s) would be much appreciated since I've got to throw
> this Lacrosse DVD together in a month as a fund raiser.
> THANKS for ANY help !!!!!
>
> Bob
Anonymous
March 31, 2004 2:40:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On 30 Mar 2004 07:18:00 -0800, bcarwell@us.ibm.com (bob carwell)
wrote:

>I have about 8 hours of video clips of lacrosse games.
> I need to watch them and quickly razor blade out usable short
>moments and store them somewhere to compile a library of clips
>preferably with recognizable names to reassemble later in a collage.

You can do this easily with VirtualDub -which is freeware, by the way.

Take the long clip, set in & out points for 1st segment, set Video to
"Direct stream copy", do "File | Save As...", and put the desired name
for the clip, but check the "Don't run this job now" checkbox. That
way, the task is added to the batch processing list. Set the In & Out
points for the 2nd segment. "Save As..." etc. When you're done filling
the jobs list, run it, and VirtualDub shall generate the clips. You
can already collect them into "libraries" by putting them in
appropriately named folders. Anyway, Premiere shall allow you to
easily build clip libraries out from the already sliced segments.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 1, 2004 12:14:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

jerry@jonesgroup.net (Jerry Jones) wrote in message news:<f86036b9.0403310754.45df13da@posting.google.com>...
> Both Ulead video editing applications feature "batch capturing" for DV
> .avi captures from digital camcorders.
>
> This means one can capture precise segments by marking specific "in"
> and "out" points corresponding to the timecode on the Mini DV tape.
>
> Jerry Jones
> http://www.jonesgroup.net
>
> Ulead VIDEOSTUDIO 7.0:
>
> http://www.ulead.com/vs/runme.htm
>
> Ulead MEDIASTUDIO PRO 7.0
>
> http://www.ulead.com/msp/runme.htm
>
> bcarwell@us.ibm.com (bob carwell) wrote:
>
> in message news:<65e33f7.0403300718.604bae62@posting.google.com>...
> > I have about 8 hours of video clips of lacrosse games.
> > I need to watch them and quickly razor blade out usable short
> > moments and store them somewhere to compile a library of clips
> > preferably with recognizable names to reassemble later in a collage.
> > Could somebody please suggest some alternatives on how to do this
> > quickly and what software? Maybe some simple avi or mpeg2 trimmer
> > shareware utility or ??
> > Note that I have Studio 8, Ulead Video Studio (?), MyDVD and
> > several other under $100 editors. But none of them seem to be able to
> > let you watch a lengthy tape and trim short sections and just store
> > them back into archive separately. Instead, you can pull video scenes
> > down onto a timeline and trim, but after you have done several, you
> > store them ALL as a Project all comingled and with one name.
> > I am trying to compile from the lengthy tapes into a library short
> > nameable segments and only THEN pull them into a single project.
> > For example I want to pull out all usable "Funny Moments" clips and
> > put them in one location. Then I want to pull out all "Face-off"
> > clips and do likewise, then all "Referee screw-ups", etc.- you get the
> > idea.
> > There are work arounds, such as in Studio 8 pulling the whole video
> > into the Project timeline, trimming to the first desired segment, then
> > saving it as a Project. This is just too klunky and time consuming
> > since it requires opening a new Project to continue and not knowing
> > where you left off, and pulling the whole video in again.
> > Surely there must be some simple utility to simply razor blade out
> > and store off chunks continuously from a larger file ?
> > I know Adobe Premier has some sort of "Log Tab" function that
> > sounds like you can do this. I will spring for Premier or some other
> > higher cost package like Vegas or Avid Express or Final Cut or any
> > lower cost editor if I have to just to do this one function quickly,
> > but in every other respect Studio 8 and the other simpler editors
> > serves my needs just fine.
> > Any solution(s) would be much appreciated since I've got to throw
> > this Lacrosse DVD together in a month as a fund raiser.
> > THANKS for ANY help !!!!!
> >
> > Bob


God Bless the Google and Bariloche and Jerry for responding !
Sounds like either VirtualDub or Ulead Video Studio 7 should do it.
(The latter I have and only per Jerry's suggestion played with it and
now see that unlike Pinnacle Studio 8 indeed you can save trimmed
clips back to the library). Unfortunately it appears they only exist
virtually as trimmed clips in the Project, as I was unable to find
corresponding trimmed .avi files on my disk. This (I think) means you
cannot NAME the clips and cannot use them in another editor unless I'm
missing something. But if I stay in Ulead I can do what I want.
Think I'll give VirtualDub a shot too.
Anyway, I thank you and about 20 lacrosse boys and their parents
unknowingly will thank you a month from now when my DVD is done ! And
very interesting bio, by the way, Jerry. Thanks for taking the time
and for the expertise, both of you !
Sincerely,

Bob
Anonymous
April 1, 2004 12:44:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

jerry@jonesgroup.net (Jerry Jones) wrote in message news:<f86036b9.0403310754.45df13da@posting.google.com>...
> Both Ulead video editing applications feature "batch capturing" for DV
> .avi captures from digital camcorders.
>
> This means one can capture precise segments by marking specific "in"
> and "out" points corresponding to the timecode on the Mini DV tape.
>
> Jerry Jones
> http://www.jonesgroup.net
>
> Ulead VIDEOSTUDIO 7.0:
>
> http://www.ulead.com/vs/runme.htm
>
> Ulead MEDIASTUDIO PRO 7.0
>
> http://www.ulead.com/msp/runme.htm
>
> bcarwell@us.ibm.com (bob carwell) wrote:
>
> in message news:<65e33f7.0403300718.604bae62@posting.google.com>...
> > I have about 8 hours of video clips of lacrosse games.
> > I need to watch them and quickly razor blade out usable short
> > moments and store them somewhere to compile a library of clips
> > preferably with recognizable names to reassemble later in a collage.
> > Could somebody please suggest some alternatives on how to do this
> > quickly and what software? Maybe some simple avi or mpeg2 trimmer
> > shareware utility or ??
> > Note that I have Studio 8, Ulead Video Studio (?), MyDVD and
> > several other under $100 editors. But none of them seem to be able to
> > let you watch a lengthy tape and trim short sections and just store
> > them back into archive separately. Instead, you can pull video scenes
> > down onto a timeline and trim, but after you have done several, you
> > store them ALL as a Project all comingled and with one name.
> > I am trying to compile from the lengthy tapes into a library short
> > nameable segments and only THEN pull them into a single project.
> > For example I want to pull out all usable "Funny Moments" clips and
> > put them in one location. Then I want to pull out all "Face-off"
> > clips and do likewise, then all "Referee screw-ups", etc.- you get the
> > idea.
> > There are work arounds, such as in Studio 8 pulling the whole video
> > into the Project timeline, trimming to the first desired segment, then
> > saving it as a Project. This is just too klunky and time consuming
> > since it requires opening a new Project to continue and not knowing
> > where you left off, and pulling the whole video in again.
> > Surely there must be some simple utility to simply razor blade out
> > and store off chunks continuously from a larger file ?
> > I know Adobe Premier has some sort of "Log Tab" function that
> > sounds like you can do this. I will spring for Premier or some other
> > higher cost package like Vegas or Avid Express or Final Cut or any
> > lower cost editor if I have to just to do this one function quickly,
> > but in every other respect Studio 8 and the other simpler editors
> > serves my needs just fine.
> > Any solution(s) would be much appreciated since I've got to throw
> > this Lacrosse DVD together in a month as a fund raiser.
> > THANKS for ANY help !!!!!
> >
> > Bob

One last note: I downloaded and tried VirtualDub and got a message
it can't locate decompressor. Apparently it only operates on
uncompressed AVI files and not compressed Video for Windows (VFW)
files such as mine and thus requires a codec to decompress the VFW. It
says "Direct Show" clips such as those used by Windows Media Player
are not suitable.
Thus, it sounds like I need a converter to convert the VFW files to
AVI before running VirtualDub. If so, where do I find such a
converter ? I know in the future I could capture in AVI format, but I
think that results in huge files, correct ? And I was told to always
capture in the same format that you intend to be outputting in, e.g.
mpeg2 in my case. Anyway, where is such a converter assuming I am
correct and need one ?

Bob

Bob
Anonymous
April 1, 2004 6:27:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On 31 Mar 2004 20:44:43 -0800, bcarwell@us.ibm.com (bob carwell)
wrote:

> One last note: I downloaded and tried VirtualDub and got a message
>it can't locate decompressor. Apparently it only operates on
>uncompressed AVI files and not compressed Video for Windows (VFW)
>files such as mine and thus requires a codec to decompress the VFW.

There are a few misconceptions in the above. VirtualDub can operate on
any AVI, compressed or not. But if it's a compressed AVI, then the
codec it was compressed with, need be installed in your PC. And all of
that is VFW. Actually, the problem of VirtualDub is that it's
restricted to VFW.

>And I was told to always
>capture in the same format that you intend to be outputting in, e.g.
>mpeg2 in my case.

You can capture as mpeg-2, then use an mpeg-2 editor (the software at
http://www.womble.com shall allow you cut mpeg-2 clips at a precise
frame, with the re-encoding of only a few frames). That is the fastest
approach. (There are ways to use VirtualDub as an editor of mpeg-2
files, but that way you convert them to AVI -so you need re-encode
back to mpeg-2 later on).

On the other hand, for the best quality, there's a slower approach:
capture as AVI, with a lossless codec (Huffyuv). That way you get the
absolute best your capture device allows you. You can then edit your
AVIs at will without any deagradation in quality. As a last step,
encode the AVIs to mpeg-2 with any of the best encoders. This takes
time and pains, but you'll squeeze up to the last bit of quality from
your material.

Some work with DV, as the oucome of their cams or capturing devices,
and this is a high-quality AVI, though not lossless as Huffyuv.
Anonymous
April 3, 2004 6:13:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Bariloche <bariloche@bariloche.com> wrote in message news:<nc0o60p2h6upuhtbhmov1ohn43ovo9vspr@4ax.com>...
> On 31 Mar 2004 20:44:43 -0800, bcarwell@us.ibm.com (bob carwell)
> wrote:
>
> > One last note: I downloaded and tried VirtualDub and got a message
> >it can't locate decompressor. Apparently it only operates on
> >uncompressed AVI files and not compressed Video for Windows (VFW)
> >files such as mine and thus requires a codec to decompress the VFW.
>
> There are a few misconceptions in the above. VirtualDub can operate on
> any AVI, compressed or not. But if it's a compressed AVI, then the
> codec it was compressed with, need be installed in your PC. And all of
> that is VFW. Actually, the problem of VirtualDub is that it's
> restricted to VFW.
>
> >And I was told to always
> >capture in the same format that you intend to be outputting in, e.g.
> >mpeg2 in my case.
>
> You can capture as mpeg-2, then use an mpeg-2 editor (the software at
> http://www.womble.com shall allow you cut mpeg-2 clips at a precise
> frame, with the re-encoding of only a few frames). That is the fastest
> approach. (There are ways to use VirtualDub as an editor of mpeg-2
> files, but that way you convert them to AVI -so you need re-encode
> back to mpeg-2 later on).
>
> On the other hand, for the best quality, there's a slower approach:
> capture as AVI, with a lossless codec (Huffyuv). That way you get the
> absolute best your capture device allows you. You can then edit your
> AVIs at will without any deagradation in quality. As a last step,
> encode the AVIs to mpeg-2 with any of the best encoders. This takes
> time and pains, but you'll squeeze up to the last bit of quality from
> your material.
>
> Some work with DV, as the oucome of their cams or capturing devices,
> and this is a high-quality AVI, though not lossless as Huffyuv.

Thank you so much for taking the trouble to follow up. Very clear
and without your advice I would have been clueless. Thanks again
!!!!!

Bob
Anonymous
April 4, 2004 7:42:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Bob -

I am thinking that the smartest way to do your project would be to do
window dubs of all the tapes to VHS. Then, you can run the tapes back
and forth without wearing out your camera, and write down which segments
to capture.

Window dubs are simple dubs from the camera with the timecode taken out
and embedded in the video. Then, every frame has a number, and you can
use the window dubs as a reference for batch capturing.

Batch captures are fairly easy - at least in Premiere. I would assume
other programs have similar functions.

Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
April 4, 2004 7:42:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Gary Eickmeier <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message news:<0CKbc.405391$Po1.192795@twister.tampabay.rr.com>...
> Bob -
>
> I am thinking that the smartest way to do your project would be to do
> window dubs of all the tapes to VHS. Then, you can run the tapes back
> and forth without wearing out your camera, and write down which segments
> to capture.
>
> Window dubs are simple dubs from the camera with the timecode taken out
> and embedded in the video. Then, every frame has a number, and you can
> use the window dubs as a reference for batch capturing.
>
> Batch captures are fairly easy - at least in Premiere. I would assume
> other programs have similar functions.
>
> Gary Eickmeier

Gary and Bariloche-
Thanks for hanging in with me because notwithstanding the help I
still have a problem as it appears still worth pursuing VirtualDub.
The test video I try to bring into VirtualDub unsuccessfully I am
almost certain was captured by Pinnacle's Studio 8 in Win98SE and not
by Windows Media Player, and I'm pretty sure it was captured as "DV"
(?) I understand that AVI is a wrapper and can enclose code of
differing types of compression. I get an error message "Couldn't
locate decompressor for format DVSD. VirtualDub requires a Video For
Windows compatable codec. DirectShow codecs such as those used by
Windows Media Player are not suitable."
I take it from this "DVSD" that in fact I had captured in "DV"
format but that "DV" is not in AVI format and does not in fact use a
"Video For Windows" codec and hence this explains the VirtualDub error
message. Correct ?
So, I gather further that I must capture in AVI to use VirtualDub
and there is no utility to convert "DV" to AVI (or IS there ?)or to
provide the appropriate decoder for VirtualDub to use my DV encoded
video ? How big is one hour of AVI (which I understand is compressed
very little) ? It may not be a problem since I have some big drives
and after trimming my segments would render in mpeg2 and clean them
out ready for the next tape.
The mpeg2(Womble) editor is too expensive (about $100) although I'm
still thinking about it. I'd like to continue capturing in DV or even
mpeg2 since I thought AVI files were huge, but may capture AVI just
because it looks like VirtualDub is the easiest way to trim and save
individual segments which is my MAIN concern.
When I brought the videos into my Win XP system, a Windows Media
Player icons were associated with them. I assume that was just a file
association thing and that XP didn't actually convert my video to
Windows Media Player format, right ? The VirtualDub error message
puzzled me because it said DirectShow codecs SUCH AS THOSE USED BY
WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER are not suitable. I gathered that VirtualDub just
saw the (new as a result of Win XP) associations of the old DV video
files with Win XP's Media Player and assumed the files were therefore
using DirectShow codecs that don't work with AVI.
Anyway, Gary I will keep your idea in mind for future projects but
unfortunately none of my video editors I don't believe use time code
(I have Studio 8, Ulead Video Studio 7, MGI's VideoWave, NeoDVD, and
Magix Video Deluxe, and also NONE of them allow you to trim video
segments and then SAVE them back to files (GRRRRRRRR). Haven't sprung
for Premier yet. And I don't think I'll be having time to do a lot of
back and forth on the miniDV tapes to wear my camera since I have
limited time anyway. But I'll keep your idea in mind when I'm not so
rushed and have software with time coding.
Sorry for the long append. Bottom line is it sounds like I simply
need to capture in AVI and use VirtualDub, correct ? As long as an
hour will fit on an 80GB drive, I should be okay. Fortunately I have
not begun capturing much of the footage to be edited yet anyway, so I
only have an hour or so in the "DV" format. I searched my drives for
".avi" and all my files which wouldn't be accepted by VirtualDub
showed up. But apparently this means my "DV" files, though "AVI" were
somehow compressed with "DirectShow Codecs" which VirtualDub doesn't
have. That's why I was wondering how could I figure out what codec
they WERE compressed with and provide it to VirtualDub.
Any confirmation/explanation of what is going on is appreciated,
and confirmation that it sounds like I should just capture in AVI with
a codec known to VirtualDub (which would be WHAT ???).

Regards,
Bob
Anonymous
April 4, 2004 11:53:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

bob carwell <bcarwell@us.ibm.com> wrote:
> snip <
>
> VirtualDub requires a Video For Windows compatible codec.

That it does. Install the Panasonic codec from
http://users.tpg.com.au/mtam/install_panvfwdv.htm and you'll be all set.

> How big is one hour of AVI ?

13 gig. You'll find a lot more valuable information at
http://www.dvdrhelp.com/


Mike
Anonymous
April 4, 2004 8:00:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

bob carwell wrote:

> Anyway, Gary I will keep your idea in mind for future projects but
> unfortunately none of my video editors I don't believe use time code
> (I have Studio 8, Ulead Video Studio 7, MGI's VideoWave, NeoDVD, and
> Magix Video Deluxe, and also NONE of them allow you to trim video
> segments and then SAVE them back to files (GRRRRRRRR).

This statement doesn't make sense. All video editing programs use
timecode. And probably all of them have some method of batch capturing,
where you either list the clips desired or press IN and OUT buttons to
designate capture points as you play the actual tape.

As for how to put the timecode onto the VHS tapes, it is done with the
camera, not the computer. THere may be a setting to output the info
along with the picture when you copy to VHS. My Sony VX2000 has it.

> Haven't sprung
> for Premier yet. And I don't think I'll be having time to do a lot of
> back and forth on the miniDV tapes to wear my camera since I have
> limited time anyway. But I'll keep your idea in mind when I'm not so
> rushed and have software with time coding.

If you need to conserve hard drive space, and also to carefully select
sections that you want to use out of lots of tape that has been shot,
I'm sorry, but there is no way except to go through the footage, in real
time (usually), and log shots. You have to do this sometime anyway, so
why not do it BEFORE capture, and save your hard drive and your editing
grief later.
> Sorry for the long append. Bottom line is it sounds like I simply
> need to capture in AVI and use VirtualDub, correct ? As long as an
> hour will fit on an 80GB drive, I should be okay. Fortunately I have
> not begun capturing much of the footage to be edited yet anyway, so I
> only have an hour or so in the "DV" format. I searched my drives for
> ".avi" and all my files which wouldn't be accepted by VirtualDub
> showed up. But apparently this means my "DV" files, though "AVI" were
> somehow compressed with "DirectShow Codecs" which VirtualDub doesn't
> have. That's why I was wondering how could I figure out what codec
> they WERE compressed with and provide it to VirtualDub.
> Any confirmation/explanation of what is going on is appreciated,
> and confirmation that it sounds like I should just capture in AVI with
> a codec known to VirtualDub (which would be WHAT ???).

I don't know what Virtualdub is, but as for your DV format questions,
seems to me there would be no problem if you capture with the same
editing software that you are planning to edit with.

Log the shots first and make a batch capture list.

Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
April 5, 2004 1:58:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Gary Eickmeier <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message news:<WiWbc.402136$jH.5901437@twister.tampabay.rr.com>...
> bob carwell wrote:
>
> > Anyway, Gary I will keep your idea in mind for future projects but
> > unfortunately none of my video editors I don't believe use time code
> > (I have Studio 8, Ulead Video Studio 7, MGI's VideoWave, NeoDVD, and
> > Magix Video Deluxe, and also NONE of them allow you to trim video
> > segments and then SAVE them back to files (GRRRRRRRR).
>
> This statement doesn't make sense. All video editing programs use
> timecode. And probably all of them have some method of batch capturing,
> where you either list the clips desired or press IN and OUT buttons to
> designate capture points as you play the actual tape.
>
> As for how to put the timecode onto the VHS tapes, it is done with the
> camera, not the computer. THere may be a setting to output the info
> along with the picture when you copy to VHS. My Sony VX2000 has it.
>
> > Haven't sprung
> > for Premier yet. And I don't think I'll be having time to do a lot of
> > back and forth on the miniDV tapes to wear my camera since I have
> > limited time anyway. But I'll keep your idea in mind when I'm not so
> > rushed and have software with time coding.
>
> If you need to conserve hard drive space, and also to carefully select
> sections that you want to use out of lots of tape that has been shot,
> I'm sorry, but there is no way except to go through the footage, in real
> time (usually), and log shots. You have to do this sometime anyway, so
> why not do it BEFORE capture, and save your hard drive and your editing
> grief later.
> > Sorry for the long append. Bottom line is it sounds like I simply
> > need to capture in AVI and use VirtualDub, correct ? As long as an
> > hour will fit on an 80GB drive, I should be okay. Fortunately I have
> > not begun capturing much of the footage to be edited yet anyway, so I
> > only have an hour or so in the "DV" format. I searched my drives for
> > ".avi" and all my files which wouldn't be accepted by VirtualDub
> > showed up. But apparently this means my "DV" files, though "AVI" were
> > somehow compressed with "DirectShow Codecs" which VirtualDub doesn't
> > have. That's why I was wondering how could I figure out what codec
> > they WERE compressed with and provide it to VirtualDub.
> > Any confirmation/explanation of what is going on is appreciated,
> > and confirmation that it sounds like I should just capture in AVI with
> > a codec known to VirtualDub (which would be WHAT ???).
>
> I don't know what Virtualdub is, but as for your DV format questions,
> seems to me there would be no problem if you capture with the same
> editing software that you are planning to edit with.
>
> Log the shots first and make a batch capture list.
>
> Gary Eickmeier

Gary-
I apologize for not being very clear. It's not that the editors I
have don't use time code, as obviously they must, but that I wasn't
sure they allow you to provide a batch capture LIST of time codes they
would then use for capture in the manner you suggested. They all in
fact have various forms of auto scene detection or splitting every "X"
seconds, or manual (pressing space bar to start/stop capture, etc.)
But I thought that even if I COULD put in time codes gleaned from a
review of VHS tapes, that given the volume of tape I am editing from
that would be a lot of writing down and typing in timecodes. I had
hoped I could just use the manual scrubber and set an IN and OUT point
to trim, save off that trimmed segment as a separate file I could name
and continue viewing the tape until I came to a next part I wanted and
repeat the process. What got all this started was discovering the
lower end editors I had would let you select and trim segments but
they remained part of the existing project and you couldn't save them
off as separate files to develop a library from all the source
material from which you would only THEN start your project. BTW I was
told in this thread that indeed VirtualDub DOES let you do just this.
Thanks for your further clarifications.
Anonymous
April 5, 2004 2:02:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Mike Kujbida" <kujfam-misleadingspam@sympatico.ca> wrote in message news:<c4osvr$2kdc2u$1@ID-113661.news.uni-berlin.de>...
> bob carwell <bcarwell@us.ibm.com> wrote:
> > snip <
> >
> > VirtualDub requires a Video For Windows compatible codec.
>
> That it does. Install the Panasonic codec from
> http://users.tpg.com.au/mtam/install_panvfwdv.htm and you'll be all set.
>
> > How big is one hour of AVI ?
>
> 13 gig. You'll find a lot more valuable information at
> http://www.dvdrhelp.com/
>
>
> Mike

Thanks Mike, especially the pointer to the Panasonic codec. I was
aware of that dvdrhelp.com website which is terrific but had lost the
URL.
BTW, do you know if someone has written a little idiot's guide to
using VirtualDub beyond the online Help ? From what little I've
played with it, it appears very powerful and useful IF you can figure
out what all the bells and whistles are.

Thanks again for the help,

Bob
Anonymous
April 5, 2004 9:32:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

bob carwell <bcarwell@us.ibm.com> wrote:
> snip <
> BTW, do you know if someone has written a little idiot's guide to
> using VirtualDub beyond the online Help ? From what little I've
> played with it, it appears very powerful and useful IF you can figure
> out what all the bells and whistles are.


Someone else may have more sites but this is what I've got.
http://www.doom9.org/virtualdub_procedures.htm
http://nickyguides.digital-digest.com/index.htm
http://www.dvdrhelp.com/guides
VDub forum: http://virtualdub.everwicked.com/index.php

Mike
Anonymous
April 5, 2004 12:30:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On 4 Apr 2004 01:17:48 -0800, bcarwell@us.ibm.com (bob carwell) wrote:

> When I brought the videos into my Win XP system, a Windows Media
>Player icons were associated with them. I assume that was just a file
>association thing and that XP didn't actually convert my video to
>Windows Media Player format, right ?

Right.

>The VirtualDub error message
>puzzled me because it said DirectShow codecs SUCH AS THOSE USED BY
>WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER are not suitable. I gathered that VirtualDub just
>saw the (new as a result of Win XP) associations of the old DV video
>files with Win XP's Media Player and assumed the files were therefore
>using DirectShow codecs that don't work with AVI.

That would be too much of an Artificial Intelligence for VirtualDub. I
bet it just didn't found a DV Vfw decompressor, and told you a
DirectShow one wouldn't do.

>I should just capture in AVI with
>a codec known to VirtualDub (which would be WHAT ???).

If you have a DV camera, you transfer the already digited content
through a firewire port. Otherwise, the best is to capture to AVI
compressed with the Huffyuv codec, which delivers lossless
compression.
Anonymous
April 5, 2004 1:58:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Mike Kujbida" <kujfam-misleadingspam@sympatico.ca> wrote in message news:<c4r935$2kgj8b$1@ID-113661.news.uni-berlin.de>...
> bob carwell <bcarwell@us.ibm.com> wrote:
> > snip <
> > BTW, do you know if someone has written a little idiot's guide to
> > using VirtualDub beyond the online Help ? From what little I've
> > played with it, it appears very powerful and useful IF you can figure
> > out what all the bells and whistles are.
>
>
> Someone else may have more sites but this is what I've got.
> http://www.doom9.org/virtualdub_procedures.htm
> http://nickyguides.digital-digest.com/index.htm
> http://www.dvdrhelp.com/guides
> VDub forum: http://virtualdub.everwicked.com/index.php
>
> Mike

Thanks Mike. The files I'm using with VirtualDub were simply
captured from my miniDV camera through firewire with the "DV" capture
setting of the capture software as I recall (Studio 8).
I would assume then from what you said about the pointer to the
Panasonic Video For Windows compatible codec that "DV" file format is
generic and decoders are generic, compatible and will operate
correctly on any "DV" file, whether captured through Studio 8 or any
other capture software, correct ?
In other words, there isn't a DV decoder specific to and used by
Studio 8 that must be used in VirtualDub, correct (and hence the
Panasonic one should work).
Sorry for the newbieness, but I'm just getting my video sea legs.

Bob
Anonymous
April 5, 2004 2:01:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Bariloche <bariloche@bariloche.com> wrote in message news:<qpu170pncb3rj6f5o68ek6dsg1ss7j4m2e@4ax.com>...
> On 4 Apr 2004 01:17:48 -0800, bcarwell@us.ibm.com (bob carwell) wrote:
>
> > When I brought the videos into my Win XP system, a Windows Media
> >Player icons were associated with them. I assume that was just a file
> >association thing and that XP didn't actually convert my video to
> >Windows Media Player format, right ?
>
> Right.
>
> >The VirtualDub error message
> >puzzled me because it said DirectShow codecs SUCH AS THOSE USED BY
> >WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER are not suitable. I gathered that VirtualDub just
> >saw the (new as a result of Win XP) associations of the old DV video
> >files with Win XP's Media Player and assumed the files were therefore
> >using DirectShow codecs that don't work with AVI.
>
> That would be too much of an Artificial Intelligence for VirtualDub. I
> bet it just didn't found a DV Vfw decompressor, and told you a
> DirectShow one wouldn't do.
>
> >I should just capture in AVI with
> >a codec known to VirtualDub (which would be WHAT ???).

Bariloche-
Thank you again.
Where does one find the Huffyuv codec ? I might be able to
tolerate some loss for this project (audience is lacrosse players,
after all ... 8>)) but I'm sure will want to go to highest quality I
can as you suggest when time permits...
Bob



Bob
>
> If you have a DV camera, you transfer the already digited content
> through a firewire port. Otherwise, the best is to capture to AVI
> compressed with the Huffyuv codec, which delivers lossless
> compression.
Anonymous
April 6, 2004 12:51:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

bob carwell <bcarwell@us.ibm.com> wrote:
> Where does one find the Huffyuv codec ? I might be able to
> tolerate some loss for this project (audience is lacrosse players,
> after all ... 8>)) but I'm sure will want to go to highest quality I
> can as you suggest when time permits...
> Bob


Using www.google.com (subtle hint here) turns up
http://neuron2.net/www.math.berkeley.edu/benrg/huffyuv....

Mike
Anonymous
April 6, 2004 12:54:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

bob carwell <bcarwell@us.ibm.com> wrote:
> "Mike Kujbida" <kujfam-misleadingspam@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
> news:<c4r935$2kgj8b$1@ID-113661.news.uni-berlin.de>...
>> bob carwell <bcarwell@us.ibm.com> wrote:
>>> snip <
>>> BTW, do you know if someone has written a little idiot's guide to
>>> using VirtualDub beyond the online Help ? From what little I've
>>> played with it, it appears very powerful and useful IF you can
>>> figure out what all the bells and whistles are.
>>
>>
>> Someone else may have more sites but this is what I've got.
>> http://www.doom9.org/virtualdub_procedures.htm
>> http://nickyguides.digital-digest.com/index.htm
>> http://www.dvdrhelp.com/guides
>> VDub forum: http://virtualdub.everwicked.com/index.php
>>
>> Mike
>
> Thanks Mike. The files I'm using with VirtualDub were simply
> captured from my miniDV camera through firewire with the "DV" capture
> setting of the capture software as I recall (Studio 8).
> I would assume then from what you said about the pointer to the
> Panasonic Video For Windows compatible codec that "DV" file format is
> generic and decoders are generic, compatible and will operate
> correctly on any "DV" file, whether captured through Studio 8 or any
> other capture software, correct ?
> In other words, there isn't a DV decoder specific to and used by
> Studio 8 that must be used in VirtualDub, correct (and hence the
> Panasonic one should work).
> Sorry for the newbieness, but I'm just getting my video sea legs.
>
> Bob


Vegas will open pretty much anything you throw at it. Whether or not
Pinnacle will is another matter. Make a short test clip and see what
happens.

Mike
Anonymous
April 6, 2004 12:27:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On 5 Apr 2004 09:58:39 -0700, bcarwell@us.ibm.com (bob carwell) wrote:

>The files I'm using with VirtualDub were simply
>captured from my miniDV camera through firewire with the "DV" capture
>setting of the capture software as I recall (Studio 8).

First of all, you are transfering already digitized video, so Huffyuv
does not enter in the equation.

Second, your camera software (Studio 8) should have come with a DV
codec.

> I would assume then from what you said about the pointer to the
>Panasonic Video For Windows compatible codec that "DV" file format is
>generic and decoders are generic, compatible and will operate
>correctly on any "DV" file, whether captured through Studio 8 or any
>other capture software, correct ?

Almost correct. All the DV codecs are compatible, yet they are not all
the same. It doesn't matter for decoding, but when it comes to
encoding they shall show differences, which are better demonstrated by
re-encoding the same material several times. You'll see how the
sharpness is lost, the colors change... I do not use DV myself, so I
do not know which one is better, but this has been discussed at the
newsgroup at times, and others should know better.
!