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From DV to DVD-R dilemma. /please help!

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April 8, 2004 7:02:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I have shot about 20 family tapes (60minutes DV cassettes) with my
Sony TRV900 camcorder that I'm planning to sell to purchase newer
model, and I'd like to copy them just in case my next camcorder uses
a different format.

As I do not have time now to edit and burn on to DVD-R all my tapes,
my doubt is:

Should I copy all my DV tapes straight from the TRV900 to DVD-R to be
edited sometime in the future on my PC, or will it be wiser to copy them to
a hard disk?

Can DVD /DVD-R be ripped , so the video can be successfully edited
using software like Adobe Premiere Pro , without losing picture quality?
If yes, what ripper software is recommended? (I have Adobe Premier Pro)

What options do I have to better achieve this with no picture quality
degradation?

I'll appreciate any help regarding this matter.

Thanks in advance.
Paul.


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More about : dvd dilemma

Anonymous
April 9, 2004 1:57:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Paul" <paul11177XX@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ZqGdnfew_bBHVujdRVn2tA@giganews.com...
> I have shot about 20 family tapes (60minutes DV cassettes) with my
> Sony TRV900 camcorder that I'm planning to sell to purchase newer
> model, and I'd like to copy them just in case my next camcorder uses
> a different format.
>
> As I do not have time now to edit and burn on to DVD-R all my tapes,
> my doubt is:
>
> Should I copy all my DV tapes straight from the TRV900 to DVD-R to be
> edited sometime in the future on my PC, or will it be wiser to copy them
to
> a hard disk?
>
> Can DVD /DVD-R be ripped , so the video can be successfully edited
> using software like Adobe Premiere Pro , without losing picture quality?
> If yes, what ripper software is recommended? (I have Adobe Premier Pro)
>
> What options do I have to better achieve this with no picture quality
> degradation?
>
> I'll appreciate any help regarding this matter.

You could write the DV-AVI files to the DVD disks as DATA files.
You would get only ~12~15 minutes of video per disk, but it would
be completely lossless(*) and importable directly into any editing
software (without ripping).

(* "lossless" beyond the 5:1 compression inherent in DV which
you can't do anything about.)
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 12:03:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Paul,
I should just keep the tapes. Otherwise a separate harddisk would be OK but
20 hours of DV will require at least a 300 Gb disk. If you copy them to DVD
as data files it would require 60 DVDs! I keep all my source material on the
tapes.

Peter


"Paul" <paul11177XX@hotmail.com> skrev i meddelandet
news:ZqGdnfew_bBHVujdRVn2tA@giganews.com...
> I have shot about 20 family tapes (60minutes DV cassettes) with my
> Sony TRV900 camcorder that I'm planning to sell to purchase newer
> model, and I'd like to copy them just in case my next camcorder uses
> a different format.
>
> As I do not have time now to edit and burn on to DVD-R all my tapes,
> my doubt is:
>
> Should I copy all my DV tapes straight from the TRV900 to DVD-R to be
> edited sometime in the future on my PC, or will it be wiser to copy them
to
> a hard disk?
>
> Can DVD /DVD-R be ripped , so the video can be successfully edited
> using software like Adobe Premiere Pro , without losing picture quality?
> If yes, what ripper software is recommended? (I have Adobe Premier Pro)
>
> What options do I have to better achieve this with no picture quality
> degradation?
>
> I'll appreciate any help regarding this matter.
>
> Thanks in advance.
> Paul.
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Please remove the "XX" from my e-mail address if you
> prefer to respond via e-mail
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
Related resources
April 15, 2004 6:31:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Many thanks to Richard and Peter!

I think for the moment I'm going to keep the tapes and the
Sony TRV900....just in case...

Regards
Paul


"Peter O Sjostrand" <po.sjostrand@telia.com> wrote in message
news:gNsdc.55588$mU6.231183@newsb.telia.net...
> Paul,
> I should just keep the tapes. Otherwise a separate harddisk would be OK
but
> 20 hours of DV will require at least a 300 Gb disk. If you copy them to
DVD
> as data files it would require 60 DVDs! I keep all my source material on
the
> tapes.
>
> Peter
>
>
> "Paul" <paul11177XX@hotmail.com> skrev i meddelandet
> news:ZqGdnfew_bBHVujdRVn2tA@giganews.com...
> > I have shot about 20 family tapes (60minutes DV cassettes) with my
> > Sony TRV900 camcorder that I'm planning to sell to purchase newer
> > model, and I'd like to copy them just in case my next camcorder uses
> > a different format.
> >
> > As I do not have time now to edit and burn on to DVD-R all my tapes,
> > my doubt is:
> >
> > Should I copy all my DV tapes straight from the TRV900 to DVD-R to be
> > edited sometime in the future on my PC, or will it be wiser to copy them
> to
> > a hard disk?
> >
> > Can DVD /DVD-R be ripped , so the video can be successfully edited
> > using software like Adobe Premiere Pro , without losing picture
quality?
> > If yes, what ripper software is recommended? (I have Adobe Premier Pro)
> >
> > What options do I have to better achieve this with no picture quality
> > degradation?
> >
> > I'll appreciate any help regarding this matter.
> >
> > Thanks in advance.
> > Paul.
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > Please remove the "XX" from my e-mail address if you
> > prefer to respond via e-mail
> > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
April 20, 2004 2:47:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

came into this thread late, but here's my take
on this...

keep your original tapes as you already
mentioned - no reason to toss them. good 4x
dvd-r's run about $70 US per 100 pack (e.g.
ritek g04's). assuming 21 min per dvd (type 1
dv avi), that's 3 dvd's per tape - about $2.10
US to backup each tape. it'll take some time (i
should know, i'm backing up 80 1 hour tapes
myself), but you'll have a format that should

be able to upload to any dv25 compatible
system, in the future. the caveat is that the
disks are write once, but if these are masters,
you won't be changing them anytime soon.
dvd-r and dv avi is a standard that i think will
be around for many years, and none of the
problems with magnetic media exist (of
course, keep them in cool dry place and
avoid scratches).

i've been doing this for my digital8 collection,
assuming a minidv cam will be my next cam.
i've had tapes with dropouts and other issues
plus i'm concerned that another cam won't
play the tapes if my cam breaks down, one
day. dvd-r media is, imho, a cheap, effective
backup solution.

dv25 is the original format on your cam, so
the quality is the same (even the timecode is
retained). but, the other thing you need to
do this is time, which it sounds like you don't
have much of.

--
brian
April 20, 2004 6:32:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Thanks for your help Brian.

I like your idea , and I think I'm going to do just
what you suggest, as I can get a very good priced 100 pack
of 4x DVD-R at some stores nearby .

Thanks again,
Paul


>"Brian T. Rowe" <browe@iname.com> wrote in message
news:nGYgc.65603$_g4.11039895@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> came into this thread late, but here's my take
> on this...
>
> keep your original tapes as you already
> mentioned - no reason to toss them. good 4x
> dvd-r's run about $70 US per 100 pack (e.g.
> ritek g04's). assuming 21 min per dvd (type 1
> dv avi), that's 3 dvd's per tape - about $2.10
> US to backup each tape. it'll take some time (i
> should know, i'm backing up 80 1 hour tapes
> myself), but you'll have a format that should
>
> be able to upload to any dv25 compatible
> system, in the future. the caveat is that the
> disks are write once, but if these are masters,
> you won't be changing them anytime soon.
> dvd-r and dv avi is a standard that i think will
> be around for many years, and none of the
> problems with magnetic media exist (of
> course, keep them in cool dry place and
> avoid scratches).
>
> i've been doing this for my digital8 collection,
> assuming a minidv cam will be my next cam.
> i've had tapes with dropouts and other issues
> plus i'm concerned that another cam won't
> play the tapes if my cam breaks down, one
> day. dvd-r media is, imho, a cheap, effective
> backup solution.
>
> dv25 is the original format on your cam, so
> the quality is the same (even the timecode is
> retained). but, the other thing you need to
> do this is time, which it sounds like you don't
> have much of.
>
> --
> brian
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
!