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Will Vegas do?

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April 9, 2004 3:45:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I must step
it up a notch.
I need reliability, stability, and high quality video output to DVD or
mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
This is what I want to do:
1. Capture DV
2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and Rotate
3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels along a
clip
6. High quality disolve, and fade
7. Create custom DVD menus
8. And of course, write the video to DVD.

I'm working on a 3.2 GHz Dell workstation, so render speed is not too
important.
Any advice is appreciated, Thank you.
Rob

More about : vegas

Anonymous
April 9, 2004 5:37:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Rob wrote:
> I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I must
> step it up a notch.
> I need reliability, stability,

I tried very hard to crash Vegas when we first evaluated it, even resorted
to video file from questionable source, I never could. Questionable file
that could have possibly crashed it, It simply refused to open them.

>and high quality video output to DVD or
> mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
> This is what I want to do:
> 1. Capture DV

Vegas yes

> 2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and Rotate

Vegas yes

> 3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video

Vegas yes

> 4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white

Vegas yes, excellent

> 5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels
> along a clip

Audio is Vegas strong point.

> 6. High quality disolve, and fade

Vegas yes, and add spicemaster and the possibilities are endless

> 7. Create custom DVD menus
> 8. And of course, write the video to DVD.

Here's the problem with Sony software: you need DVD Architect for that
functionality, and I would classify DVDA as kiddy software in the DVD world,
almost like they made this stupid software as an afterthought; The problem
is that it's not priced at all as kiddy software, but priced like the grown
up with less functionality than some $59.00 special. Maybe DVDA ver 2 will
addresse this, but that's for the future. For now, with your DVD
requirement, I would be tempted to stear you to the Adobe side, the
Premiere/Encore/Audition combo is hard to beat for the price, especially
combined with a Matrox realtime card, so maybe you should give that a try
instead. Premiere is not as intuitive as Vegas, or as stable, but Encore is
a real DVD authoring app and not a toy, and Audition will do most, if not
all, that Vegas can do with Audio.

--
www.odysea.ca
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 1:08:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

if dvd architect is not a good option, cant vegas be used for the video
editing and another product (other than dvd architect) be selected for the
dvd writing/authoring ?

--
xx
"Deco_time" <coral_city2000@NOSPAMyahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:BEqdc.39114$wq4.2044688@news20.bellglobal.com...
> Rob wrote:
> > I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I must
> > step it up a notch.
> > I need reliability, stability,
>
> I tried very hard to crash Vegas when we first evaluated it, even resorted
> to video file from questionable source, I never could. Questionable file
> that could have possibly crashed it, It simply refused to open them.
>
> >and high quality video output to DVD or
> > mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
> > This is what I want to do:
> > 1. Capture DV
>
> Vegas yes
>
> > 2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and Rotate
>
> Vegas yes
>
> > 3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
>
> Vegas yes
>
> > 4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
>
> Vegas yes, excellent
>
> > 5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels
> > along a clip
>
> Audio is Vegas strong point.
>
> > 6. High quality disolve, and fade
>
> Vegas yes, and add spicemaster and the possibilities are endless
>
> > 7. Create custom DVD menus
> > 8. And of course, write the video to DVD.
>
> Here's the problem with Sony software: you need DVD Architect for that
> functionality, and I would classify DVDA as kiddy software in the DVD
world,
> almost like they made this stupid software as an afterthought; The problem
> is that it's not priced at all as kiddy software, but priced like the
grown
> up with less functionality than some $59.00 special. Maybe DVDA ver 2 will
> addresse this, but that's for the future. For now, with your DVD
> requirement, I would be tempted to stear you to the Adobe side, the
> Premiere/Encore/Audition combo is hard to beat for the price, especially
> combined with a Matrox realtime card, so maybe you should give that a try
> instead. Premiere is not as intuitive as Vegas, or as stable, but Encore
is
> a real DVD authoring app and not a toy, and Audition will do most, if not
> all, that Vegas can do with Audio.
>
> --
> www.odysea.ca
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 2:01:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Have a look at canopus. Although vegas is good i much prefer Edius2 with an
acclerator card _ storm/raptor rt2 etc... Premiere is good but big learning
curve and expensive!

You can do all the effects you state in Edius2 and burn dvds from timeline.

check it out at www.canopus.com
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 2:04:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

strand wrote:
> if dvd architect is not a good option, cant vegas be used for the
> video editing and another product (other than dvd architect) be
> selected for the dvd writing/authoring ?
>
Of course, in fact, we outsource the authoring part for now and I think she
uses a product from sonic to author. The question is, does it make sense
economically to buy from different source instead of bundle?

--
www.odysea.ca
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 2:08:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Yes it can. Just render the files out in whatever format the other app
requires.
As much as I'd like to say wait for version 2 of DVD Architect, go ahead and
use another app because, although it'll be announced at NAB in 2 weeks, the
shipping date is still unknown.

Mike

strand <anyone@hotmail.com> wrote:
> if dvd architect is not a good option, cant vegas be used for the
> video editing and another product (other than dvd architect) be
> selected for the dvd writing/authoring ?
>
>> Rob wrote:
>>> I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I
>>> must step it up a notch.
>>> I need reliability, stability,
>>
>> I tried very hard to crash Vegas when we first evaluated it, even
>> resorted to video file from questionable source, I never could.
>> Questionable file that could have possibly crashed it, It simply
>> refused to open them.
>>
>>> and high quality video output to DVD or
>>> mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
>>> This is what I want to do:
>>> 1. Capture DV
>>
>> Vegas yes
>>
>>> 2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and
>>> Rotate
>>
>> Vegas yes
>>
>>> 3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
>>
>> Vegas yes
>>
>>> 4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
>>
>> Vegas yes, excellent
>>
>>> 5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels
>>> along a clip
>>
>> Audio is Vegas strong point.
>>
>>> 6. High quality disolve, and fade
>>
>> Vegas yes, and add spicemaster and the possibilities are endless
>>
>>> 7. Create custom DVD menus
>>> 8. And of course, write the video to DVD.
>>
>> Here's the problem with Sony software: you need DVD Architect for
>> that functionality, and I would classify DVDA as kiddy software in
>> the DVD world, almost like they made this stupid software as an
>> afterthought; The problem is that it's not priced at all as kiddy
>> software, but priced like the grown up with less functionality than
>> some $59.00 special. Maybe DVDA ver 2 will addresse this, but that's
>> for the future. For now, with your DVD requirement, I would be
>> tempted to stear you to the Adobe side, the Premiere/Encore/Audition
>> combo is hard to beat for the price, especially combined with a
>> Matrox realtime card, so maybe you should give that a try instead.
>> Premiere is not as intuitive as Vegas, or as stable, but Encore is a
>> real DVD authoring app and not a toy, and Audition will do most, if
>> not all, that Vegas can do with Audio.
>>
>> --
>> www.odysea.ca
April 9, 2004 3:16:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Fantastic feedback from everyone, thank you!
Can you tell me which DVD recording software would fit the bill for
reliabillity, stability, quality and custom authoring features? Somebody
mentioned Adobe Encore DVD. Although the Adobe Video bundle is a great deal,
I've used Premiere and find it has lots of features, but lacks
intuitiveness. So I'd like to use Vegas for the editing part. So does Vegas
and Adobe Encore DVD sound like a good match?
Rob

"Deco_time" <coral_city2000@NOSPAMyahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:BEqdc.39114$wq4.2044688@news20.bellglobal.com...
> Rob wrote:
> > I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I must
> > step it up a notch.
> > I need reliability, stability,
>
> I tried very hard to crash Vegas when we first evaluated it, even resorted
> to video file from questionable source, I never could. Questionable file
> that could have possibly crashed it, It simply refused to open them.
>
> >and high quality video output to DVD or
> > mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
> > This is what I want to do:
> > 1. Capture DV
>
> Vegas yes
>
> > 2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and Rotate
>
> Vegas yes
>
> > 3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
>
> Vegas yes
>
> > 4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
>
> Vegas yes, excellent
>
> > 5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels
> > along a clip
>
> Audio is Vegas strong point.
>
> > 6. High quality disolve, and fade
>
> Vegas yes, and add spicemaster and the possibilities are endless
>
> > 7. Create custom DVD menus
> > 8. And of course, write the video to DVD.
>
> Here's the problem with Sony software: you need DVD Architect for that
> functionality, and I would classify DVDA as kiddy software in the DVD
world,
> almost like they made this stupid software as an afterthought; The problem
> is that it's not priced at all as kiddy software, but priced like the
grown
> up with less functionality than some $59.00 special. Maybe DVDA ver 2 will
> addresse this, but that's for the future. For now, with your DVD
> requirement, I would be tempted to stear you to the Adobe side, the
> Premiere/Encore/Audition combo is hard to beat for the price, especially
> combined with a Matrox realtime card, so maybe you should give that a try
> instead. Premiere is not as intuitive as Vegas, or as stable, but Encore
is
> a real DVD authoring app and not a toy, and Audition will do most, if not
> all, that Vegas can do with Audio.
>
> --
> www.odysea.ca
>
>
April 9, 2004 3:32:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

For compatibility's sake I should probably mention that my DVD writer is a
Teac DV-W58e.
Rob


"Rob" <rob@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:B%zdc.1341$K9.2456@news1.mts.net...
> Fantastic feedback from everyone, thank you!
> Can you tell me which DVD recording software would fit the bill for
> reliabillity, stability, quality and custom authoring features? Somebody
> mentioned Adobe Encore DVD. Although the Adobe Video bundle is a great
deal,
> I've used Premiere and find it has lots of features, but lacks
> intuitiveness. So I'd like to use Vegas for the editing part. So does
Vegas
> and Adobe Encore DVD sound like a good match?
> Rob
>
> "Deco_time" <coral_city2000@NOSPAMyahoo.ca> wrote in message
> news:BEqdc.39114$wq4.2044688@news20.bellglobal.com...
> > Rob wrote:
> > > I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I must
> > > step it up a notch.
> > > I need reliability, stability,
> >
> > I tried very hard to crash Vegas when we first evaluated it, even
resorted
> > to video file from questionable source, I never could. Questionable file
> > that could have possibly crashed it, It simply refused to open them.
> >
> > >and high quality video output to DVD or
> > > mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
> > > This is what I want to do:
> > > 1. Capture DV
> >
> > Vegas yes
> >
> > > 2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and Rotate
> >
> > Vegas yes
> >
> > > 3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
> >
> > Vegas yes
> >
> > > 4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
> >
> > Vegas yes, excellent
> >
> > > 5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels
> > > along a clip
> >
> > Audio is Vegas strong point.
> >
> > > 6. High quality disolve, and fade
> >
> > Vegas yes, and add spicemaster and the possibilities are endless
> >
> > > 7. Create custom DVD menus
> > > 8. And of course, write the video to DVD.
> >
> > Here's the problem with Sony software: you need DVD Architect for that
> > functionality, and I would classify DVDA as kiddy software in the DVD
> world,
> > almost like they made this stupid software as an afterthought; The
problem
> > is that it's not priced at all as kiddy software, but priced like the
> grown
> > up with less functionality than some $59.00 special. Maybe DVDA ver 2
will
> > addresse this, but that's for the future. For now, with your DVD
> > requirement, I would be tempted to stear you to the Adobe side, the
> > Premiere/Encore/Audition combo is hard to beat for the price, especially
> > combined with a Matrox realtime card, so maybe you should give that a
try
> > instead. Premiere is not as intuitive as Vegas, or as stable, but Encore
> is
> > a real DVD authoring app and not a toy, and Audition will do most, if
not
> > all, that Vegas can do with Audio.
> >
> > --
> > www.odysea.ca
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 4:31:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

In spite of what I said in my earlier post, if you can wait a week or so,
Sony is releasing Vegas 5 & DVDA 2 at NAB (huge trade show). It starts Apr.
17 and we'll know shipping dates for certain then.

Mike

Rob <rob@hotpop.com> wrote:
> Fantastic feedback from everyone, thank you!
> Can you tell me which DVD recording software would fit the bill for
> reliabillity, stability, quality and custom authoring features?
> Somebody mentioned Adobe Encore DVD. Although the Adobe Video bundle
> is a great deal, I've used Premiere and find it has lots of features,
> but lacks intuitiveness. So I'd like to use Vegas for the editing
> part. So does Vegas and Adobe Encore DVD sound like a good match?
> Rob
>
> "Deco_time" <coral_city2000@NOSPAMyahoo.ca> wrote in message
> news:BEqdc.39114$wq4.2044688@news20.bellglobal.com...
>> Rob wrote:
>>> I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I
>>> must step it up a notch.
>>> I need reliability, stability,
>>
>> I tried very hard to crash Vegas when we first evaluated it, even
>> resorted to video file from questionable source, I never could.
>> Questionable file that could have possibly crashed it, It simply
>> refused to open them.
>>
>>> and high quality video output to DVD or
>>> mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
>>> This is what I want to do:
>>> 1. Capture DV
>>
>> Vegas yes
>>
>>> 2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and
>>> Rotate
>>
>> Vegas yes
>>
>>> 3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
>>
>> Vegas yes
>>
>>> 4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
>>
>> Vegas yes, excellent
>>
>>> 5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels
>>> along a clip
>>
>> Audio is Vegas strong point.
>>
>>> 6. High quality disolve, and fade
>>
>> Vegas yes, and add spicemaster and the possibilities are endless
>>
>>> 7. Create custom DVD menus
>>> 8. And of course, write the video to DVD.
>>
>> Here's the problem with Sony software: you need DVD Architect for
>> that functionality, and I would classify DVDA as kiddy software in
>> the DVD world, almost like they made this stupid software as an
>> afterthought; The problem is that it's not priced at all as kiddy
>> software, but priced like the grown up with less functionality than
>> some $59.00 special. Maybe DVDA ver 2 will addresse this, but that's
>> for the future. For now, with your DVD requirement, I would be
>> tempted to stear you to the Adobe side, the Premiere/Encore/Audition
>> combo is hard to beat for the price, especially combined with a
>> Matrox realtime card, so maybe you should give that a try instead.
>> Premiere is not as intuitive as Vegas, or as stable, but Encore is a
>> real DVD authoring app and not a toy, and Audition will do most, if
>> not all, that Vegas can do with Audio.
>>
>> --
>> www.odysea.ca
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 4:38:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Rob wrote:

> I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I must step
> it up a notch.
> I need reliability, stability, and high quality video output to DVD or
> mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
> This is what I want to do:

Never tried Vegas, and I have just a couple of comments for you.

> 1. Capture DV
> 2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and Rotate
> 3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
> 4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
> 5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels along a
> clip
> 6. High quality disolve, and fade
> 7. Create custom DVD menus

What your asking for here is not what an editing program is for. DVD
menus are created my an authoring program once you have all your assets
for creating the DVD. The DVD authoring process is a whole other field.

> 8. And of course, write the video to DVD.

Again. this is the job of the Authoring software, not the editing software.

> I'm working on a 3.2 GHz Dell workstation, so render speed is not too
> important.

Sheer horse power is part of what makes things render fast, but not all
of it. Newbies always say render speed is not important.. But after
you've worked with a huge project, and you sit and watch a computer in
what seams like an endless amount of time, for many many hours on end,
you'll start to think that render time IS NOW A HUGE FACTOR. :) 

> Any advice is appreciated, Thank you.

Of course, everyone is going to say, "my program does this", and "my
program does that".. because the truth is that every editing program on
the market does just about everything you've ask for here.

I just wanted to give you some off hand advice.

-Richard
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 7:17:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Rob <rob@hotpop.com> wrote:
> For compatibility's sake I should probably mention that my DVD writer
> is a Teac DV-W58e.
> Rob

FWIW, a search turned up this on the Cow forum.

"Well, after creating 4 coasters, I decided to just take the already created
Audio and Video folders that DVD Architect creates and burn a "data" DVD
using a burning software from Sonic (I'm sure ANY CD/DVD burning software
would work). That worked great."
If you want to read the whole thread, it's at http://tinyurl.com/34yct

Mike
Anonymous
April 10, 2004 1:14:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

All editing programs will take quite a while to render, but at least with
Vegas once you have started the rendering job it's not completely dead
computer time. Vegas allows you to open the program for a second time &
continue to work editing while the rendering goes on in the background.


"Richard Ragon" <bsema01@hanaho.com> wrote in message
news:ZOwdc.20137$h82.18264@newssvr27.news.prodigy.com...
> Rob wrote:
>
> > I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I must
step
> > it up a notch.
> > I need reliability, stability, and high quality video output to DVD or
> > mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
> > This is what I want to do:
>
> Never tried Vegas, and I have just a couple of comments for you.
>
> > 1. Capture DV
> > 2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and Rotate
> > 3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
> > 4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
> > 5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels
along a
> > clip
> > 6. High quality disolve, and fade
> > 7. Create custom DVD menus
>
> What your asking for here is not what an editing program is for. DVD
> menus are created my an authoring program once you have all your assets
> for creating the DVD. The DVD authoring process is a whole other field.
>
> > 8. And of course, write the video to DVD.
>
> Again. this is the job of the Authoring software, not the editing
software.
>
> > I'm working on a 3.2 GHz Dell workstation, so render speed is not too
> > important.
>
> Sheer horse power is part of what makes things render fast, but not all
> of it. Newbies always say render speed is not important.. But after
> you've worked with a huge project, and you sit and watch a computer in
> what seams like an endless amount of time, for many many hours on end,
> you'll start to think that render time IS NOW A HUGE FACTOR. :) 
>
> > Any advice is appreciated, Thank you.
>
> Of course, everyone is going to say, "my program does this", and "my
> program does that".. because the truth is that every editing program on
> the market does just about everything you've ask for here.
>
> I just wanted to give you some off hand advice.
>
> -Richard
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 10, 2004 1:14:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

VIDEOT wrote:

> All editing programs will take quite a while to render, but at least with
> Vegas once you have started the rendering job it's not completely dead
> computer time. Vegas allows you to open the program for a second time &
> continue to work editing while the rendering goes on in the background.

Are you talking about rendering your timeline? To see your applied
effects such as color correction? Or, are you talking about rendering
to another format such as MPEG2?


> "Richard Ragon" <bsema01@hanaho.com> wrote in message
> news:ZOwdc.20137$h82.18264@newssvr27.news.prodigy.com...
>
>>Rob wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I must
>
> step
>
>>>it up a notch.
>>>I need reliability, stability, and high quality video output to DVD or
>>>mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
>>>This is what I want to do:
>>
>>Never tried Vegas, and I have just a couple of comments for you.
>>
>>
>>>1. Capture DV
>>>2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and Rotate
>>>3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
>>>4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
>>>5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels
>
> along a
>
>>>clip
>>>6. High quality disolve, and fade
>>>7. Create custom DVD menus
>>
>>What your asking for here is not what an editing program is for. DVD
>>menus are created my an authoring program once you have all your assets
>>for creating the DVD. The DVD authoring process is a whole other field.
>>
>>
>>>8. And of course, write the video to DVD.
>>
>>Again. this is the job of the Authoring software, not the editing
>
> software.
>
>>>I'm working on a 3.2 GHz Dell workstation, so render speed is not too
>>>important.
>>
>>Sheer horse power is part of what makes things render fast, but not all
>>of it. Newbies always say render speed is not important.. But after
>>you've worked with a huge project, and you sit and watch a computer in
>>what seams like an endless amount of time, for many many hours on end,
>>you'll start to think that render time IS NOW A HUGE FACTOR. :) 
>>
>>
>>>Any advice is appreciated, Thank you.
>>
>>Of course, everyone is going to say, "my program does this", and "my
>>program does that".. because the truth is that every editing program on
>>the market does just about everything you've ask for here.
>>
>>I just wanted to give you some off hand advice.
>>
>>-Richard
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 10, 2004 1:14:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Richard Ragon <bsema04NOSPAM@hanaho.com> wrote:
> VIDEOT wrote:
>
>> All editing programs will take quite a while to render, but at least
>> with Vegas once you have started the rendering job it's not
>> completely dead computer time. Vegas allows you to open the program
>> for a second time & continue to work editing while the rendering
>> goes on in the background.
>
> Are you talking about rendering your timeline? To see your applied
> effects such as color correction? Or, are you talking about rendering
> to another format such as MPEG2?


Pretty much anything you want. An advantage to Vegas is the ability of
having multiple copies running simultaneously. For example, you can be
rendering one project while editing another one. Colour correction (or any
other effect, for that matter) is "generally" not applied to the whole
project but rather to a specific section of the timeline. You can be
rendering that section out and continue editing your project with the second
copy you have opened. The rendered section is simply added to a new track
in the existing project.

Mike
Anonymous
April 10, 2004 2:52:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Mike Kujbida wrote:
> Richard Ragon <bsema04NOSPAM@hanaho.com> wrote:
>
>>VIDEOT wrote:
>>
>>
>>>All editing programs will take quite a while to render, but at least
>>>with Vegas once you have started the rendering job it's not
>>>completely dead computer time. Vegas allows you to open the program
>>>for a second time & continue to work editing while the rendering
>>>goes on in the background.
>>
>>Are you talking about rendering your timeline? To see your applied
>>effects such as color correction? Or, are you talking about rendering
>>to another format such as MPEG2?
>
>
>
> Pretty much anything you want. An advantage to Vegas is the ability of
> having multiple copies running simultaneously. For example, you can be
> rendering one project while editing another one. Colour correction (or any
> other effect, for that matter) is "generally" not applied to the whole
> project but rather to a specific section of the timeline. You can be
> rendering that section out and continue editing your project with the second
> copy you have opened. The rendered section is simply added to a new track
> in the existing project.
>
> Mike

Please stop trying to sell me Vegas. I was simply trying to clarify
what you meant by saying render.

Ok, all editing programs don't take quite a while to render. Final Cut
Pro has no render time "at all" when working working with low
compression editing. However, once you render to mpeg-2 this takes some
time. I can still work on the Mac but most experts advise that you just
don't touch anything, leave it and come back to it later, just to be sure.

I usually just save my renders to a batch, and have then run late at
night. :) 

Thanks
-Richard
Anonymous
April 10, 2004 2:52:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Richard Ragon <bsema04NOSPAM@hanaho.com> wrote:
> Mike Kujbida wrote:
>> Richard Ragon <bsema04NOSPAM@hanaho.com> wrote:
>>
>>> VIDEOT wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> All editing programs will take quite a while to render, but at
>>>> least with Vegas once you have started the rendering job it's not
>>>> completely dead computer time. Vegas allows you to open the
>>>> program for a second time & continue to work editing while the
>>>> rendering goes on in the background.
>>>
>>> Are you talking about rendering your timeline? To see your applied
>>> effects such as color correction? Or, are you talking about
>>> rendering to another format such as MPEG2?
>>
>>
>>
>> Pretty much anything you want. An advantage to Vegas is the ability
>> of having multiple copies running simultaneously. For example, you
>> can be rendering one project while editing another one. Colour
>> correction (or any other effect, for that matter) is "generally" not
>> applied to the whole project but rather to a specific section of the
>> timeline. You can be rendering that section out and continue
>> editing your project with the second copy you have opened. The
>> rendered section is simply added to a new track in the existing
>> project.
>>
>> Mike
>
> Please stop trying to sell me Vegas. I was simply trying to clarify
> what you meant by saying render.
>
> Ok, all editing programs don't take quite a while to render. Final
> Cut Pro has no render time "at all" when working working with low
> compression editing. However, once you render to mpeg-2 this takes
> some time. I can still work on the Mac but most experts advise that
> you just don't touch anything, leave it and come back to it later,
> just to be sure.
>
> I usually just save my renders to a batch, and have then run late at
> night. :) 
>
> Thanks
> -Richard


Richard, I know you're a Mac user and I wouldn't try to get you over to the
"other" side :-)

FCP does do some things Vegas users would like such as the low res option
you mention. In it's current version, Vegas doesn't have that option so
everything must be rendered. The preview window operates in real time
though so this helps offset the lack of this particular feature. There are
currently more add-on boxes available for FCP (such as AJA) but this is
slowly changing.

Not sure about FCP but, with Vegas, I can have multiple audio & video
formats on the timeline and Vegas doesn't bat an eye. On one recent
project, I had a quad split with 4 320x240 QT clips and a mix of wave and
mp3 audio clips as well. No problem whatsoever.

With a fast enough machine, having multiple copies open doesn't stress the
system either.

Vegas makes use of something called scripts (which a number of users have
created and made available for free) that allow the automation of a number
of different tasks. Renders, for example. I've got a script that allows me
to render a file out in every video format I havve codecs for, including QT.
It does take longer but I don't have to sit at the computer waiting for one
render to finish before I start another.

Mike
Anonymous
April 10, 2004 12:15:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

the only program that did a magnificent slow motion is ulead media studio
pro (audio also in slow motion !!!)

"Jerry Jones" <jerry@jonesgroup.net> schreef in bericht
news:f86036b9.0404090834.2275ce26@posting.google.com...
> Alos have a look at Ulead MediaStudio Pro 7.0:
>
> http://www.ulead.com/msp/runme.htm
>
> Jerry Jones
> http://www.jonesgroup.net
Anonymous
April 10, 2004 12:45:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

You can render the entire project if you like & still keep on working in
another instance of Vegas.

"Richard Ragon" <bsema04NOSPAM@hanaho.com> wrote in message
news:%WBdc.12781115$Of.2132622@news.easynews.com...
> VIDEOT wrote:
>
> > All editing programs will take quite a while to render, but at least
with
> > Vegas once you have started the rendering job it's not completely dead
> > computer time. Vegas allows you to open the program for a second time &
> > continue to work editing while the rendering goes on in the background.
>
> Are you talking about rendering your timeline? To see your applied
> effects such as color correction? Or, are you talking about rendering
> to another format such as MPEG2?
>
>
> > "Richard Ragon" <bsema01@hanaho.com> wrote in message
> > news:ZOwdc.20137$h82.18264@newssvr27.news.prodigy.com...
> >
> >>Rob wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>I have weathered the scourge of entry-level video editors, now I must
> >
> > step
> >
> >>>it up a notch.
> >>>I need reliability, stability, and high quality video output to DVD or
> >>>mpeg2. Fancy looking interface is NOT a criteria.
> >>>This is what I want to do:
> >>
> >>Never tried Vegas, and I have just a couple of comments for you.
> >>
> >>
> >>>1. Capture DV
> >>>2. Import and keyframe images for high quality Pan and Scan and Rotate
> >>>3. High quality slow motion, speed up or reverse video
> >>>4. Color control, like tweaking clips to black and white
> >>>5. Precise control of audio tracks, and ability to key audio levels
> >
> > along a
> >
> >>>clip
> >>>6. High quality disolve, and fade
> >>>7. Create custom DVD menus
> >>
> >>What your asking for here is not what an editing program is for. DVD
> >>menus are created my an authoring program once you have all your assets
> >>for creating the DVD. The DVD authoring process is a whole other field.
> >>
> >>
> >>>8. And of course, write the video to DVD.
> >>
> >>Again. this is the job of the Authoring software, not the editing
> >
> > software.
> >
> >>>I'm working on a 3.2 GHz Dell workstation, so render speed is not too
> >>>important.
> >>
> >>Sheer horse power is part of what makes things render fast, but not all
> >>of it. Newbies always say render speed is not important.. But after
> >>you've worked with a huge project, and you sit and watch a computer in
> >>what seams like an endless amount of time, for many many hours on end,
> >>you'll start to think that render time IS NOW A HUGE FACTOR. :) 
> >>
> >>
> >>>Any advice is appreciated, Thank you.
> >>
> >>Of course, everyone is going to say, "my program does this", and "my
> >>program does that".. because the truth is that every editing program on
> >>the market does just about everything you've ask for here.
> >>
> >>I just wanted to give you some off hand advice.
> >>
> >>-Richard
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
April 10, 2004 11:41:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Mike Kujbida wrote:

> Richard, I know you're a Mac user and I wouldn't try to get you over to the
> "other" side :-)

Not true.. I also have a couple of PCs. I usto use PC with Premiere
mostly, but once I started going into professional editing, I realized
that most of the industry uses Macs, and the PC is simple just a hack in
this area.. :) 

> FCP does do some things Vegas users would like such as the low res option
> you mention. In it's current version, Vegas doesn't have that option so
> everything must be rendered. The preview window operates in real time
> though so this helps offset the lack of this particular feature. There are
> currently more add-on boxes available for FCP (such as AJA) but this is
> slowly changing.

That AJA totally rocks, but what I'd really like to have is a Ignighter
card.. :) 

> Not sure about FCP but, with Vegas, I can have multiple audio & video
> formats on the timeline and Vegas doesn't bat an eye. On one recent
> project, I had a quad split with 4 320x240 QT clips and a mix of wave and
> mp3 audio clips as well. No problem whatsoever.

You can only run one copy of FCP, however you can have multiple
sequences running.. in other words, it's allot like the way Mozila
browser works where you can have a hundred different web sites up, but
in one window, all under "tabs".. Use of tabs are far better on memory
than having 100 instances of a program running. I think the the new
Premiere uses this same tabbed system too.

> With a fast enough machine, having multiple copies open doesn't stress the
> system either.

Having the right program is better than having hardware to get around
the limits of the program. :) 

> Vegas makes use of something called scripts (which a number of users have
> created and made available for free) that allow the automation of a number
> of different tasks. Renders, for example. I've got a script that allows me
> to render a file out in every video format I havve codecs for, including QT.
> It does take longer but I don't have to sit at the computer waiting for one
> render to finish before I start another.

That sounds pretty kewl.. FCP doesn't have that.

My wife used to watch a show called Eastenders. They took it off BBC
America last year.. I found someone uploading every show in a
newsgroup.. It's in Dixv format AVI. I can though this is FCP and have
it just burn a Mpeg-2, but the renders can take a bit because its got a
lot to do when converting it from a AVI to DV/DVCPRO Quicktime (Which is
the real time format for FCP). So, I run it though Quicktime Pro first,
than put it into FCP for the Mpeg-2.. The two step process takes
longer, however it faster to let QTPro handle it for some odd reason..
I wish that I have a script to do this process overnight.

Thanks
-Richard
Anonymous
April 11, 2004 4:10:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Rob wrote:
> Fantastic feedback from everyone, thank you!
> Can you tell me which DVD recording software would fit the bill for
> reliabillity, stability, quality and custom authoring features?
> Somebody mentioned Adobe Encore DVD. Although the Adobe Video bundle
> is a great deal, I've used Premiere and find it has lots of features,
> but lacks intuitiveness. So I'd like to use Vegas for the editing
> part. So does Vegas and Adobe Encore DVD sound like a good match?
> Rob
>
Encore is a self standing DVD authoring app in it's own right and will work
with any elemantary stream. The trial version I've installed worked great
for me, untill I decided that authoring was not my cup of tea, but Adobe
forum is full of post of peoples who can't get it to work properly; It's a
version 1 program- a very impressive version 1 considering it was built from
scratch- but it seems it either work great or not at all depending on what
system it is installed on from the post I've read. Best is to test the trial
version on your system. With any authoring app of this caliber though, you
have to be prepared for a very steep learning curve; I wasn't and decided my
time was best spent doing other things :) 
Other choices include product from Sonic, Ulead, Sony DVD Architect2 might
also be an option if you can afford to wait and of course Apple DVD Studio
Pro 2 (that app would almost be enough to make me want to buy a Mac, even
though I hate them, if I was serious about DVD authoring).


--
www.odysea.ca
Anonymous
April 11, 2004 6:01:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> Encore is a self standing DVD authoring app in it's own right and will
work
> with any elemantary stream. The trial version I've installed worked
great
> for me, untill I decided that authoring was not my cup of tea, but
Adobe


I felt the same way until I viewed this tutorial:

http://www.wrigleyvideo.com/videotutorial/tut_encore.ht...

That has me sold on Encore. I also think Adobe's products are
un-intuitive, but once you get used to Adobe's non-standard Windows
apps, they are exceedingly powerful as well as very stable.
!