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Setting up a wireless network in an apartment block

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 17, 2004 10:53:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Hi there

I'm a complete newbie at Wireless networks so please be gentle with me!

In short, currently I have a PC, a USB ADSL modem and a fat new 4.6megabit
ADSL connection.

I'm looking to 'sell' my spare capacity to my neighbours who live in my
apartment block. I would like to keep 2megabits for myself and let my
potential customers share the other 2.6mbits.

The block itself is (a) 3 storeys high, (b) timber framed and (c) I live on
the ground floor.

From a technical point of view, I'm not sure if my idea is possible, and
what hardware is required if it is. My questions are..

1) What hardware/software would i need? I'm assuming I need a router of some
sort.
2) Would the signal from the router be strong enough to penetrate 30ft with
2 ceilings in between (if you see what I mean)?
3) How can I make it secure? MAC addresses?
4) How can I throttle the bandwidth I give to them?
5) I don't want to have to leave my PC on all day. Is there a setup that
doesn't need that?

Any help would be appreciated - I'm reasonably technical but not enough
though!

cheers, L
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 17, 2004 3:34:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Here are my comments:
- Does your provider allow you to resell their connectivity?
- To limit bandwidth, you are going to most likely have to invest in more
expensive router equipment
- Otherwise, I would recommend using something like a Netgear FVS318 router
with firewall along with a wireless access point such as a Linksys WAP54G.
I only mention these as I have used them. Take a look at comparable
equipment from other vendors.
- I believe that separating the router from the access point gives you more
flexibility and less problems, but it will cost you a few dollars more.
- By using a router to hand out DHCP addresses, your PC does not have to be
involved. You can leave it turned off and everyone else will have access.
- As for security, I would not do anything less than WPA Pre-shared key.
WEP is okay, but with WPA being widely available in new equipment, you
should stick with it. Even better, if you setup a Win2k or Win2003 server,
you can go to WPA RADIUS using EAP-TLS and certificates. That is much more
complicated than you probably want to get into.
- Skip the MAC address filtering and hiding the SSID. That causes more
problems than it is worth. If you are concerned about neighbors giving out
the shared key associated with WPA-PSK, you can turn on MAC address
filtering. However, any decent hacker can quickly spoof a MAC address.
Hiding the SSID only causes problems with Windows XP.
- As for connectivity through walls, you will just have to try it and see
how it works.
- Keep in mind that you are in for a support nightmare by doing this. If
someone is playing online games at 2am and their wireless connectivity
suddenly goes down, they have every right to come banging on your door. :-)

Jeff

"liamski" <liamski@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:43828ABF-7F94-46E5-B364-D8D30012429A@microsoft.com...
> Hi there
>
> I'm a complete newbie at Wireless networks so please be gentle with me!
>
> In short, currently I have a PC, a USB ADSL modem and a fat new 4.6megabit
> ADSL connection.
>
> I'm looking to 'sell' my spare capacity to my neighbours who live in my
> apartment block. I would like to keep 2megabits for myself and let my
> potential customers share the other 2.6mbits.
>
> The block itself is (a) 3 storeys high, (b) timber framed and (c) I live
> on
> the ground floor.
>
> From a technical point of view, I'm not sure if my idea is possible, and
> what hardware is required if it is. My questions are..
>
> 1) What hardware/software would i need? I'm assuming I need a router of
> some
> sort.
> 2) Would the signal from the router be strong enough to penetrate 30ft
> with
> 2 ceilings in between (if you see what I mean)?
> 3) How can I make it secure? MAC addresses?
> 4) How can I throttle the bandwidth I give to them?
> 5) I don't want to have to leave my PC on all day. Is there a setup that
> doesn't need that?
>
> Any help would be appreciated - I'm reasonably technical but not enough
> though!
>
> cheers, L
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 17, 2004 9:55:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Thanks Jeff - this is great advice and much appreciated

Lee in London

"Jeff Durham" wrote:

> Here are my comments:
> - Does your provider allow you to resell their connectivity?
> - To limit bandwidth, you are going to most likely have to invest in more
> expensive router equipment
> - Otherwise, I would recommend using something like a Netgear FVS318 router
> with firewall along with a wireless access point such as a Linksys WAP54G.
> I only mention these as I have used them. Take a look at comparable
> equipment from other vendors.
> - I believe that separating the router from the access point gives you more
> flexibility and less problems, but it will cost you a few dollars more.
> - By using a router to hand out DHCP addresses, your PC does not have to be
> involved. You can leave it turned off and everyone else will have access.
> - As for security, I would not do anything less than WPA Pre-shared key.
> WEP is okay, but with WPA being widely available in new equipment, you
> should stick with it. Even better, if you setup a Win2k or Win2003 server,
> you can go to WPA RADIUS using EAP-TLS and certificates. That is much more
> complicated than you probably want to get into.
> - Skip the MAC address filtering and hiding the SSID. That causes more
> problems than it is worth. If you are concerned about neighbors giving out
> the shared key associated with WPA-PSK, you can turn on MAC address
> filtering. However, any decent hacker can quickly spoof a MAC address.
> Hiding the SSID only causes problems with Windows XP.
> - As for connectivity through walls, you will just have to try it and see
> how it works.
> - Keep in mind that you are in for a support nightmare by doing this. If
> someone is playing online games at 2am and their wireless connectivity
> suddenly goes down, they have every right to come banging on your door. :-)
>
> Jeff
>
> "liamski" <liamski@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:43828ABF-7F94-46E5-B364-D8D30012429A@microsoft.com...
> > Hi there
> >
> > I'm a complete newbie at Wireless networks so please be gentle with me!
> >
> > In short, currently I have a PC, a USB ADSL modem and a fat new 4.6megabit
> > ADSL connection.
> >
> > I'm looking to 'sell' my spare capacity to my neighbours who live in my
> > apartment block. I would like to keep 2megabits for myself and let my
> > potential customers share the other 2.6mbits.
> >
> > The block itself is (a) 3 storeys high, (b) timber framed and (c) I live
> > on
> > the ground floor.
> >
> > From a technical point of view, I'm not sure if my idea is possible, and
> > what hardware is required if it is. My questions are..
> >
> > 1) What hardware/software would i need? I'm assuming I need a router of
> > some
> > sort.
> > 2) Would the signal from the router be strong enough to penetrate 30ft
> > with
> > 2 ceilings in between (if you see what I mean)?
> > 3) How can I make it secure? MAC addresses?
> > 4) How can I throttle the bandwidth I give to them?
> > 5) I don't want to have to leave my PC on all day. Is there a setup that
> > doesn't need that?
> >
> > Any help would be appreciated - I'm reasonably technical but not enough
> > though!
> >
> > cheers, L
> >
>
>
>
Related resources
September 18, 2004 3:51:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I do not think that FVS318 works with USB Modem.

Actually almost all of the Entry Level Cable/DSL Routers do not work with
USB Modem,





"liamski" <liamski@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:6968BA78-B5D5-4D68-8ADD-18544043DAF7@microsoft.com...
> Thanks Jeff - this is great advice and much appreciated
>
> Lee in London
>
> "Jeff Durham" wrote:
>
> > Here are my comments:
> > - Does your provider allow you to resell their connectivity?
> > - To limit bandwidth, you are going to most likely have to invest in
more
> > expensive router equipment
> > - Otherwise, I would recommend using something like a Netgear FVS318
router
> > with firewall along with a wireless access point such as a Linksys
WAP54G.
> > I only mention these as I have used them. Take a look at comparable
> > equipment from other vendors.
> > - I believe that separating the router from the access point gives you
more
> > flexibility and less problems, but it will cost you a few dollars more.
> > - By using a router to hand out DHCP addresses, your PC does not have to
be
> > involved. You can leave it turned off and everyone else will have
access.
> > - As for security, I would not do anything less than WPA Pre-shared key.
> > WEP is okay, but with WPA being widely available in new equipment, you
> > should stick with it. Even better, if you setup a Win2k or Win2003
server,
> > you can go to WPA RADIUS using EAP-TLS and certificates. That is much
more
> > complicated than you probably want to get into.
> > - Skip the MAC address filtering and hiding the SSID. That causes more
> > problems than it is worth. If you are concerned about neighbors giving
out
> > the shared key associated with WPA-PSK, you can turn on MAC address
> > filtering. However, any decent hacker can quickly spoof a MAC address.
> > Hiding the SSID only causes problems with Windows XP.
> > - As for connectivity through walls, you will just have to try it and
see
> > how it works.
> > - Keep in mind that you are in for a support nightmare by doing this.
If
> > someone is playing online games at 2am and their wireless connectivity
> > suddenly goes down, they have every right to come banging on your door.
:-)
> >
> > Jeff
> >
> > "liamski" <liamski@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > news:43828ABF-7F94-46E5-B364-D8D30012429A@microsoft.com...
> > > Hi there
> > >
> > > I'm a complete newbie at Wireless networks so please be gentle with
me!
> > >
> > > In short, currently I have a PC, a USB ADSL modem and a fat new
4.6megabit
> > > ADSL connection.
> > >
> > > I'm looking to 'sell' my spare capacity to my neighbours who live in
my
> > > apartment block. I would like to keep 2megabits for myself and let my
> > > potential customers share the other 2.6mbits.
> > >
> > > The block itself is (a) 3 storeys high, (b) timber framed and (c) I
live
> > > on
> > > the ground floor.
> > >
> > > From a technical point of view, I'm not sure if my idea is possible,
and
> > > what hardware is required if it is. My questions are..
> > >
> > > 1) What hardware/software would i need? I'm assuming I need a router
of
> > > some
> > > sort.
> > > 2) Would the signal from the router be strong enough to penetrate 30ft
> > > with
> > > 2 ceilings in between (if you see what I mean)?
> > > 3) How can I make it secure? MAC addresses?
> > > 4) How can I throttle the bandwidth I give to them?
> > > 5) I don't want to have to leave my PC on all day. Is there a setup
that
> > > doesn't need that?
> > >
> > > Any help would be appreciated - I'm reasonably technical but not
enough
> > > though!
> > >
> > > cheers, L
> > >
> >
> >
> >
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 18, 2004 1:02:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

You are right. I did not see that the OP mentioned that the modem was USB.
This implies that it has to be connected to the PC which means that the PC
probably has to be on all of the time. I would suggest getting a modem that
has an ethernet plug for the home side. This would allow greater
flexibility in choosing a router.

Jeff


"Jack" <www.ezlan.net&gt; wrote in message
news:%23Jt2ELTnEHA.2552@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>I do not think that FVS318 works with USB Modem.
>
> Actually almost all of the Entry Level Cable/DSL Routers do not work with
> USB Modem,
>
>
>
>
>
> "liamski" <liamski@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:6968BA78-B5D5-4D68-8ADD-18544043DAF7@microsoft.com...
>> Thanks Jeff - this is great advice and much appreciated
>>
>> Lee in London
>>
>> "Jeff Durham" wrote:
>>
>> > Here are my comments:
>> > - Does your provider allow you to resell their connectivity?
>> > - To limit bandwidth, you are going to most likely have to invest in
> more
>> > expensive router equipment
>> > - Otherwise, I would recommend using something like a Netgear FVS318
> router
>> > with firewall along with a wireless access point such as a Linksys
> WAP54G.
>> > I only mention these as I have used them. Take a look at comparable
>> > equipment from other vendors.
>> > - I believe that separating the router from the access point gives you
> more
>> > flexibility and less problems, but it will cost you a few dollars more.
>> > - By using a router to hand out DHCP addresses, your PC does not have
>> > to
> be
>> > involved. You can leave it turned off and everyone else will have
> access.
>> > - As for security, I would not do anything less than WPA Pre-shared
>> > key.
>> > WEP is okay, but with WPA being widely available in new equipment, you
>> > should stick with it. Even better, if you setup a Win2k or Win2003
> server,
>> > you can go to WPA RADIUS using EAP-TLS and certificates. That is much
> more
>> > complicated than you probably want to get into.
>> > - Skip the MAC address filtering and hiding the SSID. That causes more
>> > problems than it is worth. If you are concerned about neighbors giving
> out
>> > the shared key associated with WPA-PSK, you can turn on MAC address
>> > filtering. However, any decent hacker can quickly spoof a MAC address.
>> > Hiding the SSID only causes problems with Windows XP.
>> > - As for connectivity through walls, you will just have to try it and
> see
>> > how it works.
>> > - Keep in mind that you are in for a support nightmare by doing this.
> If
>> > someone is playing online games at 2am and their wireless connectivity
>> > suddenly goes down, they have every right to come banging on your door.
> :-)
>> >
>> > Jeff
>> >
>> > "liamski" <liamski@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> > news:43828ABF-7F94-46E5-B364-D8D30012429A@microsoft.com...
>> > > Hi there
>> > >
>> > > I'm a complete newbie at Wireless networks so please be gentle with
> me!
>> > >
>> > > In short, currently I have a PC, a USB ADSL modem and a fat new
> 4.6megabit
>> > > ADSL connection.
>> > >
>> > > I'm looking to 'sell' my spare capacity to my neighbours who live in
> my
>> > > apartment block. I would like to keep 2megabits for myself and let my
>> > > potential customers share the other 2.6mbits.
>> > >
>> > > The block itself is (a) 3 storeys high, (b) timber framed and (c) I
> live
>> > > on
>> > > the ground floor.
>> > >
>> > > From a technical point of view, I'm not sure if my idea is possible,
> and
>> > > what hardware is required if it is. My questions are..
>> > >
>> > > 1) What hardware/software would i need? I'm assuming I need a router
> of
>> > > some
>> > > sort.
>> > > 2) Would the signal from the router be strong enough to penetrate
>> > > 30ft
>> > > with
>> > > 2 ceilings in between (if you see what I mean)?
>> > > 3) How can I make it secure? MAC addresses?
>> > > 4) How can I throttle the bandwidth I give to them?
>> > > 5) I don't want to have to leave my PC on all day. Is there a setup
> that
>> > > doesn't need that?
>> > >
>> > > Any help would be appreciated - I'm reasonably technical but not
> enough
>> > > though!
>> > >
>> > > cheers, L
>> > >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>
>
!