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Multiple access points

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 22, 2004 8:58:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

This is probably an easy one but here goes:

I've set up a WAP in each of three wings of a school, with a fourth where
the wings meet. These are USR turbo WAP/Router units, and all are connected
to the school 100Mbit LAN
These are basically configured with the same (hidden) SSID, 128bit WEP,
channel 11 for the UK

The clients are Dell Latitude d505 running XP Pro SP1 with Intel 2100bg
wireless cards

The problem I have is that the laptops don't seem to connect to the nearest
WAP with the strongest signal - they seem to lock onto the other more
distant units with the effect that the signal is poor and keeps dropping. I
can check this via wireless stats on the laptop.
Both WAP and Intel cards are at latest driver/firmware release, and the
connection is being managed by the Intel software rather than windows

Questions:
Is this the best way to implement the network?
Should the WAPs be configured to broadcast on different channels (ie to
avoid interference) ?

Thanks
Mike

More about : multiple access points

Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 22, 2004 8:58:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Sounds like you are almost doing the right thing. :-) First, you should
choose different channels for the access points. Be sure to select
non-overlapping channels though. For instance, 1, 6, and 11 do not overlap.
If the wings are far enough apart, you could set them all to the same
channel such as 1. Then set your one in the middle to either 6 or 11.
Another possibility is to set the wings to 1, 4, and 8. Then set the one in
the middle as 11 to minimize overlap.

Second, because you are using XP, I would not hide the SSID. Many people
say that this adds security, but it is security by obscurity. It is not
difficult for a hacker to figure out an SSID. It is more difficult to
figure out the WEP key. A casual user is not going to break your WEP key.
A hacker may attempt and will have already quickly gotten by the hidden
SSID. Also, Windows XP has reported problems with not working "as expected"
with hidden SSIDs. I think this has to do with network detection when other
wireless networks are in the area. I don't know if that would apply to your
multiple access points or only if you have other wireless networks in the
vicinity such as a building next store.

Lastly, have you considered using WPA over WEP? It is more secure. Since
you already have to setup a WEP key, you can use the WPA-PSK mode which
requires a shared key. Most of the new products you buy off the shelf today
support WPA. A better option is WPA-RADIUS, but that is more work and
requires a radius server. One is provided in Win2k and Win2003 server. It
is known as IAS.

Jeff

"MLJ" <m_l_j@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:bbi4d.135$t06.117@newsfe6-win.ntli.net...
>
> This is probably an easy one but here goes:
>
> I've set up a WAP in each of three wings of a school, with a fourth where
> the wings meet. These are USR turbo WAP/Router units, and all are
> connected to the school 100Mbit LAN
> These are basically configured with the same (hidden) SSID, 128bit WEP,
> channel 11 for the UK
>
> The clients are Dell Latitude d505 running XP Pro SP1 with Intel 2100bg
> wireless cards
>
> The problem I have is that the laptops don't seem to connect to the
> nearest WAP with the strongest signal - they seem to lock onto the other
> more distant units with the effect that the signal is poor and keeps
> dropping. I can check this via wireless stats on the laptop.
> Both WAP and Intel cards are at latest driver/firmware release, and the
> connection is being managed by the Intel software rather than windows
>
> Questions:
> Is this the best way to implement the network?
> Should the WAPs be configured to broadcast on different channels (ie to
> avoid interference) ?
>
> Thanks
> Mike
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 22, 2004 11:01:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Hi
Thanks for the reply
The only problem I have with this is that the config software for the
wireless client expects a channel (it doesn't seem to have a "dynamic"
option), and at the moment all clients are set to channel 11
If I adopt the setup below will the laptops still try to connect to a WAP
broadcasting on 11 ?
Would I be better off installing SP2 and changing wireless so that it is
managed by Windows ?

Thnaks
Mike


"Jeff Durham" <jdurham.outdoor.life@cinci.rr.com> wrote in message
news:%23MFNBmMoEHA.3464@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Sounds like you are almost doing the right thing. :-) First, you should
> choose different channels for the access points. Be sure to select
> non-overlapping channels though. For instance, 1, 6, and 11 do not
> overlap. If the wings are far enough apart, you could set them all to the
> same channel such as 1. Then set your one in the middle to either 6 or
> 11. Another possibility is to set the wings to 1, 4, and 8. Then set the
> one in the middle as 11 to minimize overlap.
>
> Second, because you are using XP, I would not hide the SSID. Many people
> say that this adds security, but it is security by obscurity. It is not
> difficult for a hacker to figure out an SSID. It is more difficult to
> figure out the WEP key. A casual user is not going to break your WEP key.
> A hacker may attempt and will have already quickly gotten by the hidden
> SSID. Also, Windows XP has reported problems with not working "as
> expected" with hidden SSIDs. I think this has to do with network
> detection when other wireless networks are in the area. I don't know if
> that would apply to your multiple access points or only if you have other
> wireless networks in the vicinity such as a building next store.
>
> Lastly, have you considered using WPA over WEP? It is more secure. Since
> you already have to setup a WEP key, you can use the WPA-PSK mode which
> requires a shared key. Most of the new products you buy off the shelf
> today support WPA. A better option is WPA-RADIUS, but that is more work
> and requires a radius server. One is provided in Win2k and Win2003
> server. It is known as IAS.
>
> Jeff
>
> "MLJ" <m_l_j@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:bbi4d.135$t06.117@newsfe6-win.ntli.net...
>>
>> This is probably an easy one but here goes:
>>
>> I've set up a WAP in each of three wings of a school, with a fourth where
>> the wings meet. These are USR turbo WAP/Router units, and all are
>> connected to the school 100Mbit LAN
>> These are basically configured with the same (hidden) SSID, 128bit WEP,
>> channel 11 for the UK
>>
>> The clients are Dell Latitude d505 running XP Pro SP1 with Intel 2100bg
>> wireless cards
>>
>> The problem I have is that the laptops don't seem to connect to the
>> nearest WAP with the strongest signal - they seem to lock onto the other
>> more distant units with the effect that the signal is poor and keeps
>> dropping. I can check this via wireless stats on the laptop.
>> Both WAP and Intel cards are at latest driver/firmware release, and the
>> connection is being managed by the Intel software rather than windows
>>
>> Questions:
>> Is this the best way to implement the network?
>> Should the WAPs be configured to broadcast on different channels (ie to
>> avoid interference) ?
>>
>> Thanks
>> Mike
>>
>>
>>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 22, 2004 11:01:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

That is the first time I have seen a wireless config program where you
specify the channel. Normally, the channel is set in the access point and
the client figures out the channel dynamically. If Windows XP SP1 does not
configure the card for you, I am not sure if SP2 will either.

I have seen roaming work where all access points used the same channel
number. In fact, that is what Linksys recommends. It is not a good idea
because of the interference factor between access points. It will cut down
on available bandwidth.

You can try using the same channel provided the access points are far enough
apart. You should also broadcast your SSID. Be sure to use WPA or WEP
though. The only other solution seems to be to replace your wireless
adapters to something more up-to-date.

Jeff


"MLJ" <m_l_j@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:k_j4d.485$m16.243@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
> Hi
> Thanks for the reply
> The only problem I have with this is that the config software for the
> wireless client expects a channel (it doesn't seem to have a "dynamic"
> option), and at the moment all clients are set to channel 11
> If I adopt the setup below will the laptops still try to connect to a WAP
> broadcasting on 11 ?
> Would I be better off installing SP2 and changing wireless so that it is
> managed by Windows ?
>
> Thnaks
> Mike
>
>
> "Jeff Durham" <jdurham.outdoor.life@cinci.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:%23MFNBmMoEHA.3464@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> Sounds like you are almost doing the right thing. :-) First, you should
>> choose different channels for the access points. Be sure to select
>> non-overlapping channels though. For instance, 1, 6, and 11 do not
>> overlap. If the wings are far enough apart, you could set them all to the
>> same channel such as 1. Then set your one in the middle to either 6 or
>> 11. Another possibility is to set the wings to 1, 4, and 8. Then set the
>> one in the middle as 11 to minimize overlap.
>>
>> Second, because you are using XP, I would not hide the SSID. Many people
>> say that this adds security, but it is security by obscurity. It is not
>> difficult for a hacker to figure out an SSID. It is more difficult to
>> figure out the WEP key. A casual user is not going to break your WEP
>> key. A hacker may attempt and will have already quickly gotten by the
>> hidden SSID. Also, Windows XP has reported problems with not working "as
>> expected" with hidden SSIDs. I think this has to do with network
>> detection when other wireless networks are in the area. I don't know if
>> that would apply to your multiple access points or only if you have other
>> wireless networks in the vicinity such as a building next store.
>>
>> Lastly, have you considered using WPA over WEP? It is more secure.
>> Since you already have to setup a WEP key, you can use the WPA-PSK mode
>> which requires a shared key. Most of the new products you buy off the
>> shelf today support WPA. A better option is WPA-RADIUS, but that is more
>> work and requires a radius server. One is provided in Win2k and Win2003
>> server. It is known as IAS.
>>
>> Jeff
>>
>> "MLJ" <m_l_j@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:bbi4d.135$t06.117@newsfe6-win.ntli.net...
>>>
>>> This is probably an easy one but here goes:
>>>
>>> I've set up a WAP in each of three wings of a school, with a fourth
>>> where the wings meet. These are USR turbo WAP/Router units, and all are
>>> connected to the school 100Mbit LAN
>>> These are basically configured with the same (hidden) SSID, 128bit WEP,
>>> channel 11 for the UK
>>>
>>> The clients are Dell Latitude d505 running XP Pro SP1 with Intel 2100bg
>>> wireless cards
>>>
>>> The problem I have is that the laptops don't seem to connect to the
>>> nearest WAP with the strongest signal - they seem to lock onto the other
>>> more distant units with the effect that the signal is poor and keeps
>>> dropping. I can check this via wireless stats on the laptop.
>>> Both WAP and Intel cards are at latest driver/firmware release, and the
>>> connection is being managed by the Intel software rather than windows
>>>
>>> Questions:
>>> Is this the best way to implement the network?
>>> Should the WAPs be configured to broadcast on different channels (ie to
>>> avoid interference) ?
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> Mike
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
May 8, 2009 1:55:15 PM

Hi this warren from philippines, I have the same problem as Mike, the difference is were implementing WLAN on a small 4 storey building and were using adsl connection with adsl modem which is provided by our ISP, 1 D-Link Router which is serves as an Access Point to 1st and 2nd floor located on the 2nd floor and 1 Linksys Access Point which is serving the 3rd and 4th flr. Both D-link Wireless Router and Linksys Access Point are configured with same SSID and WEP Key. But i dont know the Channel whats the channel are using on both wireless device.

That building are occupied by our 17 tenants and all of them are using laptops and connect thru the WLAN. The problem is they are complaining of intermittent connection and there is a case when 3 or more laptops are connected they losing thier connection. Then i took a see for the problem. i found out that almost all of the laptops are connected thru D-link Wireless Router even the laptops on 4th flr. so meaning the access point on 3rd floor is useless. Then i try to change the WEP key of the Linksys Access Point defferent from the Wireless Router. Then it doesnt came to my mind that i should change the channel too. Now im waiting for the concern of the tenants if their connection is doing smooth and no intemittent connection.

In this case what do you think is the main problem of what ive done? is the problem fixed? or it getting worst? What should i do if the concern is still exisiting about the intermittent connection?

Hope i can here some advise from the experts.

Thank you in advance.

Warren
!