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film/video scoring software

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Anonymous
June 15, 2004 5:37:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

What is the best in low, mid, and high budget film/video scoring
software?
Anonymous
June 15, 2004 5:59:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On the PC there is Sonar, Nuendo, Cubase, ProTools.

On the mac there is ProTools, Digital Performer and Nuendo and Logic.


"hosko" <goofy@daffy.net> wrote in message
news:m66tc0dg4clh1h7mif0uo6e2ascuch2ued@4ax.com...
> What is the best in low, mid, and high budget film/video scoring
> software?
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 2:21:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

www.smartsound.com

Randy

"hosko" <goofy@daffy.net> wrote in message
news:m66tc0dg4clh1h7mif0uo6e2ascuch2ued@4ax.com...
> What is the best in low, mid, and high budget film/video scoring
> software?
Related resources
June 16, 2004 5:18:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Bill Van Dyk" <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote in message
news:40D04CF1.2040200@christian-horizons.org...
> The trouble with most factory-made music tracks is that they are almost
> always bland, colourless, and dull. Worse than "elevator music", if
> imaginable. You may think most people don't care-- maybe they don't,
> but I do. I notice immediately if the music on the video I'm watching
> has that bland, generic flavour to it.
>
> If you can't spend very much and you want to avoid copyright issues, you
> may have no choice. But I've already made up my mind that if I needed
> music for a production of any importance, I would hire a local band (I
> happen to be acquainted with many musicians) and have them create an
> original music track. It wouldn't be that hard, given today's
> technology, to work this out. And I would think that most jazz
> musicians, especially, would be able to improvise something fairly
> quickly. You don't need their best chops-- just something with a bit of
> character to it. It would also allow them to attune the music to the
> video content.
>
> But this idea may be too far out, or too difficult to implement, for
> most people.

Pay a visit to your local college music department. Amazing talent and a
great desire to see their work "out there" in any way possible. Pay fairly,
but if your budget allows for a six-pack and pizza, you can probably get it
for that.
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 5:44:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Bill Van Dyk" <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote in message
news:40D04CF1.2040200@christian-horizons.org...
And I would think that most jazz musicians, especially, would be able to
improvise something fairly quickly. You don't need their best chops-- just
something with a bit of character to it.


That's exactly what the people who make those bland libraries are thinking.
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 5:44:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Big difference though, is that a local, self-respecting jazz musician
will still give you better stuff than those libraries. And, as I
mentioned, the music can be customized to suit the content.

Just out of curiousity, has anybody tried this? I am pretty sure I
could pesonally hire a drummer, pianist, and bass for a few hundred
bucks. Give them the video and half a day and I'm quite sure they could
come up with a reasonably good sound track, quick and dirty, to
minidisc, or whatever you want. Convert to a wave as a separate audio
track, and mix in...

The musicians can always use the work. They can retain the right to use
the music elsewhere (not likely you'll see it in a competing product)
without taking any value away from your production. And everything's
legal and good.

I would also note that they could conceivably use old classical or other
types of music that has become public domain.

And then, when somebody steals the music off your video, you can sue them!

nappy wrote:

>"Bill Van Dyk" <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote in message
>news:40D04CF1.2040200@christian-horizons.org...
>And I would think that most jazz musicians, especially, would be able to
>improvise something fairly quickly. You don't need their best chops-- just
>something with a bit of character to it.
>
>
>That's exactly what the people who make those bland libraries are thinking.
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 5:44:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> Big difference though, is that a local, self-respecting jazz musician
> will still give you better stuff than those libraries. ...
> Just out of curiousity, has anybody tried this? I am pretty sure I
> could pesonally hire a drummer, pianist, and bass for a few hundred
> bucks. Give them the video and half a day and I'm quite sure they could
> come up with a reasonably good sound track...

I mixed a film based on poetry of Jack Kerouac, read by Johnny Depp and
others, that had a score like that. It was free-form jazz - perfectly
appropriate for the subject.

But that's a specific structure (or lack thereof). In most cases,
performing jazz musicians riff on the changes, and sometimes melody, of
established songs. So you've got a copyright issue. They can do this live
because the venue pays a performance license. But if you're going to put
video to it, you need sync and repro licenses... even if you or they are
doing the recording.

And there's the issue of production. Just because someone can play, it
doesn't necessarily follow that they know how to record. And even if they
know how to record, they might not know how to shape a piece of music so
it supports the arc of a video.

In point of fact, some library music is very good, particularly if you go
to the better and larger needle-drop houses. If you then edit it to match
the video, it can be perfectly appropriate.

What I sometimes do is build the basic underscore with library music,
trimmed and tweaked to sound like something original. Then I bring in a
composer/keyboard player/arranger to do the more important cues, backing
into the things I've already cut.

--
Correct address is spell out the letter j, AT dplaydahtcom
Clio- and Emmy-winning sound design
Learn audio for video at www.dplay.com
June 16, 2004 5:44:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Bill Van Dyk" <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote in message
news:40D055C6.7030509@christian-horizons.org...
> Big difference though, is that a local, self-respecting jazz musician
> will still give you better stuff than those libraries. And, as I
> mentioned, the music can be customized to suit the content.
>
> Just out of curiousity, has anybody tried this? I am pretty sure I
> could pesonally hire a drummer, pianist, and bass for a few hundred
> bucks. Give them the video and half a day and I'm quite sure they could
> come up with a reasonably good sound track, quick and dirty, to
> minidisc, or whatever you want. Convert to a wave as a separate audio
> track, and mix in...
>
> The musicians can always use the work. They can retain the right to use
> the music elsewhere (not likely you'll see it in a competing product)
> without taking any value away from your production. And everything's
> legal and good.

I've done it a few times. Most I ever paid was $200, least I paid was a
couple beers. VERY satisfied every time.
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 9:07:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> I would also note that they could conceivably use old classical or other
> types of music that has become public domain.

How can you tell if your source is public domain? I have a large series of
CDs that were printed in W. Germany in the 1980s by PMG, the Pilz Media
Group. There are also addresses on the labels for the Pilz Compact Disc Ltd
at some California addresses.they were sold as sets very cheaply. I can
find no information about these companies so I'm assuming they are no longer
in business. Would that mean that their CDs could be used without copyright
problems?

Jeanne
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 9:08:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> I would also note that they could conceivably use old classical or other
> types of music that has become public domain.

I'm wondering if recordings made in Soviet Russia would no longer be under
copyright since that entity no longer exists?

Jeanne
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 11:50:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Bill Van Dyk" wrote ...
>
The trouble with most factory-made music tracks is
> that they are almost always bland, colourless, and dull.


Well, DUH!!!

I didn't say this was the best music money could buy. The poster asked if
there was any software that would do scoring for his video. I offered one
option (which, interestingly, hadn't been offered earlier in the thread).
That's all.

Obviously, if one can afford a few hundred bucks to pay musicians to come in
and record a custom sound track every time, they probably should. Only
problem is, if you don't like it, you're stuck having to pay the musicians.
At least with software (and the libraries) like Smart Sound offers, if you
don't like it, you can try another track from the library.

I've done it all. Had musicians come in. Built loops. Even played some
stuff myself. Not everyone has all those options at their disposal, and a
software solution may be the most cost-effective and perfectly adequate for
their needs. We're not talking about Academy Award-winning stuff here.
We're talking about good, functional stuff for many people's needs.

And Smart Sound is one way to go. There are certainly worse ways to go, and
judging from some of the custom music I've heard done, hiring live musicians
is sometimes just such an inferior way. There's no guarantee you'll get
what you want.

Such is life.

Randy
Anonymous
June 17, 2004 12:34:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> Pay a visit to your local college music department. Amazing talent and a
> great desire to see their work "out there" in any way possible. Pay fairly,
> but if your budget allows for a six-pack and pizza, you can probably get it
> for that.

But be aware you might not be able to use the college's instruments,
recording space, or equipment. Many schools get equipment and software
very cheaply or free as donations from the mfrs (and to seed future
users), with the provision that it can't be used on commercial projects.

--
Correct address is spell out the letter j, AT dplaydahtcom
Clio- and Emmy-winning sound design
Learn audio for video at www.dplay.com
June 18, 2004 9:32:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Bill Van Dyk <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote:

[snip]
>If you can't afford to do that, I personally would prefer to use silence
>over the kind of processed cheese you get from canned music. I
[snip]

Many (all?) documentaries on Sky Channel use an eerie sounding clip from "Basic
Instinct".
It's also funny hearing a few clips from "1496" (1996 version) in many ads,
documentaries etc.
Another favourite used in many, many comedy movie ads as background music is
"What's this" -song from "A Nightmare before Christmas" instrumental version.
Now LOTR themes are popping up as backround on DVD menu music.
All great themes btw.
!