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New to IT, please help

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March 31, 2011 4:16:20 PM

As everyone knows the job market is horrible. Therefor I have decided to somewhat make a career change. I graduated with a bachelors in business management in Dec. 2008. I have been doing temp jobs ever since, not being able to get something permanent. I have always loved computers so I have decided to do a 3 week boot camp that will get me the A+, Net+ and Sec+. I am wondering what kind of job I can get with those 3 certs and my bachelors. Also what am I lookig at salary wise. I live in the Washington DC area. Thanks a lot for everyones help.

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Anonymous
March 31, 2011 8:35:48 PM

Don't know about USA, but those will give you first level support/technician/Programmer jobs here in UK, up to £20Kpa
March 31, 2011 8:42:58 PM

Yeah you wont pass all 3 in 3 weeks. No way in hell.
Related resources
March 31, 2011 11:10:05 PM

Its one week each class for each cert. I am not worried at all about not passing. Besides if I dont feel comfortable no one is going to force me to take the exams. I will be just fine. Any other thoughts besides negative ones?
April 4, 2011 3:12:53 PM

If you were to pass all of those tests within three weeks I am assuming that you are already an experienced professional in the field. I can already tell you that those tests are not exactly simple. The A+ is the general basics of Microsoft troubleshooting. Network+ steps it up a bit with the knowlegde needed to answer the questions. Server+ just the same.

I would be cautious, especially if your spending money. I have been in the industry for 12 years and I can tell you that the network+ certification is significantly more in depth than the A+

I wish you luck. If you are an experienced On Site Tech then I would say you can probably pass all three exams with no problem.

However, if your just starting up a career change, I own my own computer repair shop and I have on site technicians in the field. I personally would hire someone with no certification that has experience along with reference credentials over a newbie with a few certs.
April 4, 2011 7:51:15 PM

Hey thanks for the advice. I am basically a newbie. I woulsd say I know more than the average person but all of this will be very new to me. And like you said, I am going to be very cautious since I am spending a lot of money. The class size is about 2-4 so I should get all the attention I need if I have issues. Also I am able to retake any of the 3 classes as many times as I want for one year. And lime I said earlier if I dont feel comfortable I wont use my voucher and take the exam. Ill wait until I am ready.
But since you have been in the industry for so long, with those 3 certs a bachelors (although unrelated) and not much to basically no experience, what do u think I can get job and salary wise? I have heard help desk making between 35-45k a year. Is that about right? And what other jobs besides that? Thanks again for your advice and help.
April 13, 2011 6:32:14 PM

Go to Monster.com and check for jobs in your area. Most helpdesk and beginning level techs make closer to 25-30k. A mid to high lvl non-network tech will make 50k in the right market. I've seen ads for "experienced network techs" that can run a server and telecom room for 40k.

The problem may be not so much that you have a degree and a cert, but that you can answer interview questions well, and know the tech inside and out. Most people ask regular A+ exam type questions though. Plus working in a corporate environment is way different that helping Aunt Mabel hook up her printer.
April 18, 2011 9:59:41 PM

Ggomes10 said:
As everyone knows the job market is horrible. Therefor I have decided to somewhat make a career change. I graduated with a bachelors in business management in Dec. 2008. I have been doing temp jobs ever since, not being able to get something permanent. I have always loved computers so I have decided to do a 3 week boot camp that will get me the A+, Net+ and Sec+. I am wondering what kind of job I can get with those 3 certs and my bachelors. Also what am I lookig at salary wise. I live in the Washington DC area. Thanks a lot for everyones help.



Well the reason people are doubting the 3 week thing is this.

A+ is cake. if you can take apart a computer, share a printer on your home router, ect.. you can pass this.

Network + little harder requires you to prep and understand how networks intertwine, routing protocols, authentication, et...

Security + Per comptias website they even suggest many years of experience before this.


A+ helps you get in the door to your first IT entry level job (help desk, phone support, ect..)
After that its just a paper on your wall.

Now what you need to decide is what do you want to do?????

Here are 3 routes i can suggest.


Cisco Routing / Networking = Work on a CCENT and then a CCNA degree (1 exam each) then work on a Network + cert. This is for setting up industry standard routers, switches, firewalls, ect..

Windows Server = Start with a Certification for windows 7 and work on a Windows Server Certification after that. This is for working with Active Directory accounts, setting up servers, setting up printer/work groups, ect...


Computer Tech - If you want to be a computer tech (build computers, install software, help users with troulbeshooting). This is the route for you. (this sounds like what you were talking about, i may be wrong)

1. A + Certification from comptia
2. Windows 7 Certification from microsoft
3. Network + Certification from Comptia


In order of who makes the most
Cisco Routing > Windows Server > Computer Tech.

Number of employees in each field a normal company has
Computer Tech > Windows Server > Cisco Routing

What did we learn? The fewer people you need the more their paid.

Go for a computer tech for now you can always move up. Look for jobs that might get you the job you want. I want to work on Cisco Routers, but i took a entry level Help desk job at a fortune 500 company till they have a opening.


List what you want to do for a living, how much you want to make (be realistic, no one who installs software for a living makes 200k), and what your willing to settle for.


I worked for Verizon wireless would got me a job working on a help desk cause it made a good reference. Companies like seeing references where you deal with customers it makes you appear social.









April 22, 2011 10:54:58 AM

Ggomes10 said:
As everyone knows the job market is horrible. Therefor I have decided to somewhat make a career change. I graduated with a bachelors in business management in Dec. 2008. I have been doing temp jobs ever since, not being able to get something permanent. I have always loved computers so I have decided to do a 3 week boot camp that will get me the A+, Net+ and Sec+. I am wondering what kind of job I can get with those 3 certs and my bachelors. Also what am I lookig at salary wise. I live in the Washington DC area. Thanks a lot for everyones help.


I lived in the Northeast and the market is very competitive. Unless you have serious ties to DC, search for the cities with the largest job market and the companies that are hiring the most.

Here are some examples:
http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/bestcompanies/20...

http://realestate.yahoo.com/promo/best-and-worst-cities...

do some searching and good luck. also, here are the top job sites to post your resume on for 2011:
http://www.ebizmba.com/articles/job-websites

Personally, I'm biased for the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Cheap land, lots of it, and companies are hiring like crazy down here. A northern suburb of Dallas called Frisco is one of the fastest growing cities in the nation. It used to be #1 a year ago. Let me know if I can do anything for you. Always check out microsoft.com/careers as well.

April 22, 2011 2:09:32 PM

Ggomes10 said:
As everyone knows the job market is horrible. Therefor I have decided to somewhat make a career change. I graduated with a bachelors in business management in Dec. 2008. I have been doing temp jobs ever since, not being able to get something permanent. I have always loved computers so I have decided to do a 3 week boot camp that will get me the A+, Net+ and Sec+. I am wondering what kind of job I can get with those 3 certs and my bachelors. Also what am I lookig at salary wise. I live in the Washington DC area. Thanks a lot for everyones help.



First thing, don't do boot camps. They are rip-offs because only time and preparation can help you pass tests.

A+ is entry-level but don't discount its importance if you are new to the field. Try temping by using national firms such as Robert Half Technology and Spherion. If you have a bachelors its a bit easier but you still need to hit the road harder than others who have the exp.

Helpdesk = mainly phone support (maybe email and front facing client support as well)
Desktop = grunt work, running around solving problems from the pc to the network jack (depending on the company and their priorities)


Network / System support = low lvl technical support -mini admin/ hi lvl desktop grunt (waving from my desk!!!!!!!!!!!)
Admin (network/ systems) = mid lvl technical support (again depends on the company) or hi lvl support/ mgr
Engineer (network/ systems) = high lvl technical support with probably managerial duties or complete control of the enterprise

Since you are new, concentrate on the first two. You won't be trusted to know enough to do much else until they have a clear idea of your general competence. Avg compensation in your area is 43K for Helpdesk and 49K for desktop.
April 27, 2011 3:17:46 PM

Folks - mind if I ptich in. Love newbies in the community 'cause we gotta recreate ourselves. We're not gettin' any younger.

The technical conversation is well covered here. I'd like to emphasize the business conversation. At the end of the day, this individual, assuming technical competence, has to achieve an earning capacity.

There are amazing resources out there for becoming a successful computer guy. If I can name names, check out Robin Robin's sales and marketing kit for MSPs, the MSP Mentor site, the CopTIA community and (ahem) my own beloved SMB Nation.

Gotta both do the work and make money at the same time folks!

cheers....harrybbbb
Harry Brelsford
CEO, SMB Nation
www.smbnation.com
"Join us June 10-11 in Toronto for 6th SMB Nation Spring" :o 
April 27, 2011 5:43:30 PM

I've worked in many areas of IT, from mom/pop and home-owned business high level corporate.

I'm going to assume you will have passed A+ and Net+.
1.) Home business. Put a large ad in the yellow pages, advertise advertise advertise. Have a good contract ready plus insurance for those unhappy customers.

2.) mom/pop. Low wages even as you work up and gain more experience. The only people here that really get paid are those that hold the company together. Site managers, lead technicians, that kind of thing. But for someone interested in IT, really interested, this may be a good in for you. With your degree in management, this may open you up to opportunities that arn't available otherwise.

3.) Small business. Generally, they hire local shops or contractor IT companies for contracts. Getting in without experience is not really possible or advisable.

3.) large companies. You have a good chance to start as an entry level and work your way up. Advertising your skills for technical management is also a good "in".

3.) Even larger companies / Government. Same as above almost.


Here is the big point however. With as many people in the field, certiifcations mean almost nothing once you start looking past meat-grinder jobs (like geek-squad, franchised companies...). Really what counts for any pay is experience. I have never personally hired someone based on their laundry list on paper. It helps once you have certifications beyond the hiring person or HR's knowledge however...

Expect low pay to start. This is your in and work hard and show your ability to continue learning and you will go far. Not many IT folks continue the path of enlightenment once they have found their hole.
April 29, 2011 4:25:44 PM

Update: I have just finshed the 3 week boot camp and have received all 3 certificates. A+, Network+, and Security+. For those who said it wasnt possible, studying and paying attention goes a long way. The instructor was also very knowledgeable and ver helpful. Provided his phone number and email and answered any question you could imagine. Very smart guy. He is currently editing my resume, putting in everything I learned, keywords, the whole nine to make it as marketable as pissible. I have talked to many people from my area and with my degree and certificates I should be able to get a Help Desk position paying anywhere from 40-45k, even with no experience just because of the area I am at. I will expect around 35-40k though just so I dont get my hopes up too much. I am going to be looking at big companies in the area lime BAE, CACI, General Dynamics, anywhere in the government, theres thousands to choose from, wish me luck. Ill let you all know how it turns out.
April 30, 2011 3:29:21 AM

I hope phone support is what you like :) . They generate lots of turnover because they tend to be stressful and overworking.
June 4, 2011 1:39:56 AM

Ggomes10 said:
Ill let you all know how it turns out.

I'd like to know too. I am wanting to start my life anew also. If I have no degree what would you guys suggest for me?

Just as background info here is my post from another forum:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Long story short after 10 years in the military and getting shafted after reaching for a 5 year goal to be a blackhawk pilot (literally by one day) because people kept messing up my paperwork, I am considering giving up on trying to finish my military career and using my GI bill to go to school.

Background: I'm a 33 year old computer/video game junkie with 42 miscellaneous credits from when I was in a college/high school dual enrollment program and havn't had any kind of formal schooling since '99. and love tinkering and computers, all of which I have learned on my own to this point with no training, Just an itch to learn.

I would love to get a degree in maybe some IT work or something along those line but am a bit overwhelmed as to which degree is the right path (much less the fact i havn't gone to college since i was 18). I don't want to be a call support or build monkey, something more advanced. If anyone has suggestions or know good sights where i can learn and narrow my path selections any are welcome.

Thanks.
June 6, 2011 3:45:05 PM

Here is some honest advise for you Bimbim.
A degree in IT (which ever path you chose, like CS) will give you an opportunity to specialize in something, and it may not be what you started.

The other bit of it is: without experience, its a catch 22. You will probably end up on the low totem poll, doing call support, building machines, monkey work. The important part is that you show hard work, thinking skills, and the desire to take on responsibility. Only the people who can't, stay on the bottom. But you need experience. Find a company or contracting company you want to work for that offers the pay and benefits you want. Start where you can in the company and go from there.

Good Luck!
June 6, 2011 4:24:29 PM

bimbim18 said:
I'd like to know too. I am wanting to start my life anew also. If I have no degree what would you guys suggest for me?

Just as background info here is my post from another forum:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Long story short after 10 years in the military and getting shafted after reaching for a 5 year goal to be a blackhawk pilot (literally by one day) because people kept messing up my paperwork, I am considering giving up on trying to finish my military career and using my GI bill to go to school.

Background: I'm a 33 year old computer/video game junkie with 42 miscellaneous credits from when I was in a college/high school dual enrollment program and havn't had any kind of formal schooling since '99. and love tinkering and computers, all of which I have learned on my own to this point with no training, Just an itch to learn.

I would love to get a degree in maybe some IT work or something along those line but am a bit overwhelmed as to which degree is the right path (much less the fact i havn't gone to college since i was 18). I don't want to be a call support or build monkey, something more advanced. If anyone has suggestions or know good sights where i can learn and narrow my path selections any are welcome.

Thanks.


A specialized school like ITT Tech may be good for you. I've had people work for me that were going there, or graduated from there, and it seems to lead to good opportunities.
June 6, 2011 5:47:57 PM

bimbim18 said:
... Long story short after 10 years in the military and getting shafted after reaching for a 5 year goal to be a blackhawk pilot (literally by one day) because people kept messing up my paperwork, I am considering giving up on trying to finish my military career and using my GI bill to go to school.

Background: I'm a 33 year old computer/video game junkie with 42 miscellaneous credits from when I was in a college/high school dual enrollment program and havn't had any kind of formal schooling since '99. and love tinkering and computers, all of which I have learned on my own to this point with no training, Just an itch to learn.

I would love to get a degree in maybe some IT work or something along those line but am a bit overwhelmed as to which degree is the right path (much less the fact i havn't gone to college since i was 18). I don't want to be a call support or build monkey, something more advanced. If anyone has suggestions or know good sights where i can learn and narrow my path selections any are welcome.

Thanks.

Just like hang-the-9 suggested, a specialized school may help greatly. I currently attend DeVry and they have many options regarding IT career paths. They even have a Career Services department that helps with finding employment.
Regarding age and schooling, I am also 31 and graduated high school in '97. I have had classmates ranging from 18 (fresh out of high school) to 40+ (need degrees to advance or changing careers).

CompTIA_Rep said:
... The other bit of it is: without experience, its a catch 22. You will probably end up on the low totem poll, doing call support, building machines, monkey work. The important part is that you show hard work, thinking skills, and the desire to take on responsibility. Only the people who can't, stay on the bottom. But you need experience. ...

I have noticed many job postings state a limited amount of "formal education" as a substitute for "job experience".
June 6, 2011 10:00:19 PM

Yes they do. Many companies state either ~X years experience or a formal degree. However, I and many placed I have worked at and consulted for agree that a "degree" is a "wait-and-see" situation. I have met many with a good education that have trouble knowing how and when to apply their knowledge. But that really is the key, education or not.
June 6, 2011 11:45:50 PM

A+ is good to get your foot in the door, but people really like Sec+. Anyway, since you are already going through temp agencies let them know right away when you get that A+ cert. You need to build some real world experience so you don't look like a total newb when applying for IT jobs. With the certs and some experience do the following

Look for jobs on Dice.com

Create a linked in account. Understanding business needs is something alot of IT guys lack so that gives you some brownie points right there. Get to know IT people and get them to recommend you on linked in (once you know what you're doing).

Tailor your resume to different IT jobs and then put those resumes on places like Career builder. A security specialist shouldn't have the same resume as a guy applying for help desk or a field tech.
June 7, 2011 3:55:32 AM

thanks for all the replies guys. I spent the last week reading into the upcoming changes in the new GI bill and am weighing my options. This is helping me tremendously!
June 7, 2011 1:30:03 PM

bimbim18 said:
thanks for all the replies guys. I spent the last week reading into the upcoming changes in the new GI bill and am weighing my options. This is helping me tremendously!


Try to get to places that actually offer a degree (associates, whatever), instead of just training to pass some exam. You will spend a bit longer but you'll have more in-depth knowledge and be able to get through interviews better. As one that has done interviews before, I know what questions to ask to see if a candidate actually knows how to work with different issues or is just tossing back an answer from a test.
June 8, 2011 5:14:40 AM

Ggomes10 said:
Update: I have just finshed the 3 week boot camp and have received all 3 certificates. A+, Network+, and Security+. For those who said it wasnt possible, studying and paying attention goes a long way. The instructor was also very knowledgeable and ver helpful. Provided his phone number and email and answered any question you could imagine. Very smart guy. He is currently editing my resume, putting in everything I learned, keywords, the whole nine to make it as marketable as pissible. I have talked to many people from my area and with my degree and certificates I should be able to get a Help Desk position paying anywhere from 40-45k, even with no experience just because of the area I am at. I will expect around 35-40k though just so I dont get my hopes up too much. I am going to be looking at big companies in the area lime BAE, CACI, General Dynamics, anywhere in the government, theres thousands to choose from, wish me luck. Ill let you all know how it turns out.


*Cough* someone called.

Here is the thing with those companies you just mentioned, most of their jobs require a security clearance, SECRET at minimum but the really nice paying jobs are TS/SCI. How does one get a security clearance? Why you must work in a job requiring one, its kind of a catch-22. Their very expensive for a company to get as the cost alone is $50,000 or more for a simple investigation. A TS with a full scope background investigation and lifestyle investigation can cost over $250,000 and take six months to two years to complete. A company isn't going to invest that much money into a new recruit. There is a catch though, civil service jobs and military often require a clearance and they'll actually get you one. Most of my coworkers are ex-military and that is where they got theirs from. If you can get into this world it's worth it, good job security and the skill sets you'll be equipped with are in demand. Otherwise start small at a local telcom, one of our guys used to do helpdesk for AOL then AT&T before doing a stint in the Army. We hired him after he left.

Cert wise, you need them to open doors but people don't like cert monkeys. A+/Network+/Security+ will cover the basics and qualify you for entry level stuff. Get a few years experience in then choose a career path to go down. Whether it be networks (CCNA/CCNP/CCIE), Windows NT (MSCA/MCITP/ect..), Database (Oracle/Sybase/SQL) or security (CISSP/GSSAI/ect..). Also do not discount the UNIX world, especially Solaris. What I've been seeing is that most of the Unix Administrators out there are getting very old very fast. Finding an experienced individual with a Solaris or Oracle cert has been a nightmare lately. We're having positions open for 6+ months because of lack of qualified applicants. We see lots of Linux guys but very few Solaris / AIX / HPUX people. Might be something to look into branching into, pick up a OCA or OCP:SSA. But the tests are not easy and they can be expensive.
June 8, 2011 5:23:10 AM

bimbim18 said:
thanks for all the replies guys. I spent the last week reading into the upcoming changes in the new GI bill and am weighing my options. This is helping me tremendously!



Bimbim do you have a clearance? What MOS were you while inside the Army? If your still in what is the chances of you re-classing to 25B or 25N? Both of those will give you documented work experience and if your an NCO and running a section then you have documented management experience completely with evaluation reports. Get a few certs tucked under your arm and you can literally walk into a very lucrative IT world.

I did 8.5 years in the Army as a 74B(renumbered to 25B). Exited as a SSG with platoon / squad management and several years as a section team chief. Clearance + experience + certs landed me a very nice paying job with GDIT that has good possibility of vertical movement and strong resistance to volatile job markets.

Since you were gunning to be a warrant officer (I'm assuming that is what you meant by the helicopter pilot goal) you might want to look at becoming a technical warrant. 251A / 253A and 250N are all applicable. The requirements are stiff but you should have most of them already taken care of. Go into those fields and when you finally ETS your resume will be platinum plated. Defense companies pay top dollar for retired technical warrants.

The hardest part of getting into this sector is that military experience is almost mandatory for the clearance, since you've already got that its just planning and learning.
June 10, 2011 2:06:26 AM

I do have a clearance, But i have been out of the army for 5 years now and my MOS was not computer related at all, Medical (not a medic though) . My only option now from what recruiters is to go Reserves as Intell. (they do have a MOS I'm eyeballing which is signal interceptions and cyphering, but I'm guessing thats more using existing tools and is probably more 'advanced monkeywork' than anything from what I'm guessing.

Thanks for the suggestion though
June 10, 2011 3:26:55 AM

Actually you may want to look at the logistical world. Logistics (supply guys) use some very nice automation systems and specialized software. One of my assignments was to manage and maintain a pretty extensive suite of servers for the bean counters. CTASC / ITV / ILAP amongst others.

Otherwise keep gunning for signal / 25B / 25N. The Army has a steep shortage of 25N's right now. Also a shortage of 25E, but there is a pretty steep requirement for that field. Don't let a recruiter / counselor convince you to throw another 4~5 years away. What their doing is only looking at 90-day requirement projections. Basically any slots open that need filling in the next 90 days, with a couple being "high priority" and floating to the top. Their mission is to fill those high priority ones and any / all of the 90-day ones. They couldn't care less about your personal needs / goals.

When I first went to join I requested 25B and was told "sorry no". They then gave me a list of about 10 jobs, none of them I wanted. I asked if they could get me 74B, and I was told nope sorry. I told them I had plenty of time and was in no rush and that I would check with the Air Force in the office across the hall. I was told to wait outside while he asked the station commander. 15 min later they called me back in and had a billet lined up for 74B. The billet has me leaving 99 days later. I signed up and entered into the DEP for the 99 days.

See if someone else would of walked in 10 days after me, they could of been offered the 74B slot I asked for. It is 100% based on timing, and they don't always tell you whats available.
June 15, 2011 7:00:44 PM

my problem is they are sticking to thier guns about they can't take Active Duty Prior Service :(  AF recruiters told me they may be hiring in July. Im keeping my fingers crossed.
June 16, 2011 7:33:09 AM

Is this Army or Air Force telling you this? AF has traditionally taken a snobby nose towards picking up "prior service" but the Army usually has arms wide open lol.

But with a draw down on the horizon and a projected reduction in force size, the Army might get stingy for a couple of years. Prior-service guys are looked at kinda sidways, you got out so you need training, but they won't get their full "moneys worth" as you have less time till retirement then a 18yr old fresh recruit.
June 17, 2011 3:18:25 AM

I did hiring in IT for many years and my best advice is to start learning as much as you possible can on your own. If you want to get into networking, buy a few old cheap Cisco routers off of Ebay, setup an overly complex home network. If you want to work with Windows create an AD environment to play in. While certs and degrees can open doors, the IT field is one of the few fields that you can be very successful purely based on your own merit. If you really know your stuff, your ownly challenge will be getting a chance to speak with the right person.
June 17, 2011 11:11:15 AM

I'd say better than downloading cheap routers off of ebay is to download GNS3. Yes, you'll need a copy of IOS for them, but it can simulate real routing in a lab. No, it won't let you physically plug, and does not do switching, but works great for setting up routing labs, which are a blast.

If you want to play with Windows or Linux and set up an enterprise network, I'd strongly consider looking at building a VMware whitebox, or getting a hold of old support server hardware. Get a copy of ESXi (free) and virtualize it. On top of giving you the necessary Windows or Linux training, it will get you started with virtualization, a very good skill to have.

I've heard that most of the government and military hiring require the basic certs you have, and I believe the DC area has a huge market (or at least it did).
September 20, 2011 1:07:33 AM

palladin9479 said:
Is this Army or Air Force telling you this? AF has traditionally taken a snobby nose towards picking up "prior service" but the Army usually has arms wide open lol.

But with a draw down on the horizon and a projected reduction in force size, the Army might get stingy for a couple of years. Prior-service guys are looked at kinda sidways, you got out so you need training, but they won't get their full "moneys worth" as you have less time till retirement then a 18yr old fresh recruit.


update, I am going to probably sign up for reserves in the next 2 weeks. I'm trying to see if they can pull some strings for me to see if a reserve unit is 'willing to train' me as a 25B. meanwhile my GI bill is going to kick in about Jan (ill be back from training by then probably) and start school. If i can get those strings pulled hopefully i can get a Fed job at least to get time under my belt. btw yes i still retain my secret clearance currently (I work for TSA)
September 20, 2011 1:18:11 AM

bimbim18 said:
update, I am going to probably sign up for reserves in the next 2 weeks. I'm trying to see if they can pull some strings for me to see if a reserve unit is 'willing to train' me as a 25B. meanwhile my GI bill is going to kick in about Jan (ill be back from training by then probably) and start school. If i can get those strings pulled hopefully i can get a Fed job at least to get time under my belt. btw yes i still retain my secret clearance currently (I work for TSA)


Keep that clearance and get some documented IT experience under your belt and your a good candidate for entry level positions for the defense contracting companies. Their always looking for fresh blood, too many people been retiring.
!