Putting both NTSC and PAL on the same disk

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

I've put together a history documentary on a DVD which was created
with DVDLab. I have made seperate versions of it for PAL and NTSC and
packaged in different boxes.

I have noticed some DVDs now being packaged as 'all regions' that will
play on both PAL and NTSC players. I'm a bit confused how anyone can
do this as they are seperate standards. Is there a main menu that you
need to select one or the other standard when the DVD runs?

Also is there any easy way of combining the files I already have onto
one disk? It would be great if I could because it would cause less
confusion in shops I have the two different types stocked in.
12 answers Last reply
More about putting ntsc disk
  1. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    "Groupwriting" <groupwriting@totalise.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:149e9684.0407050907.1964e69f@posting.google.com...
    > I've put together a history documentary on a DVD which was created
    > with DVDLab. I have made seperate versions of it for PAL and NTSC and
    > packaged in different boxes.
    >
    > I have noticed some DVDs now being packaged as 'all regions' that will
    > play on both PAL and NTSC players. I'm a bit confused how anyone can
    > do this as they are seperate standards. Is there a main menu that you
    > need to select one or the other standard when the DVD runs?
    >
    > Also is there any easy way of combining the files I already have onto
    > one disk? It would be great if I could because it would cause less
    > confusion in shops I have the two different types stocked in.

    Typcially all region or the technically incorrect "region 0" dvds are NTSC
    material.

    Why? Because most of the PAL world has mutli-standard televisions, whereas
    NOrth America is almost entirely NTSC only sets. Also alot of the players
    sold in the PAL regions also do PAL to NTSC and vice-versa conversion as
    well.
  2. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    In article <hcmGc.198808$Gx4.56891@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>,
    Biz <biznospam@notatt.net> writes
    >
    >"Groupwriting" <groupwriting@totalise.co.uk> wrote in message
    >news:149e9684.0407050907.1964e69f@posting.google.com...
    >> I've put together a history documentary on a DVD which was created
    >> with DVDLab. I have made seperate versions of it for PAL and NTSC and
    >> packaged in different boxes.
    >>
    >> I have noticed some DVDs now being packaged as 'all regions' that will
    >> play on both PAL and NTSC players. I'm a bit confused how anyone can
    >> do this as they are seperate standards. Is there a main menu that you
    >> need to select one or the other standard when the DVD runs?
    >>
    >> Also is there any easy way of combining the files I already have onto
    >> one disk? It would be great if I could because it would cause less
    >> confusion in shops I have the two different types stocked in.
    >
    >Typcially all region or the technically incorrect "region 0" dvds are NTSC
    >material.
    >
    >Why? Because most of the PAL world has mutli-standard televisions, whereas
    >NOrth America is almost entirely NTSC only sets. Also alot of the players
    >sold in the PAL regions also do PAL to NTSC and vice-versa conversion as
    >well.
    >
    The actual data on the disk is not NTSC or PAL or anything else, it's
    just MPEG.

    NTSC and PAL is encoding of the analogue video output, done by the DVD
    player when it replays the disk, to suit the user's TV.

    What you say above is true for VHS, where the video on the tape IS pal
    or ntsc encoded and VCRs can convert it.
    --
    Tim Mitchell
  3. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    "Tim Mitchell" <timng@sabretechnology.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:aMdP6CPs8o6AFAZp@tega.co.uk...
    > In article <hcmGc.198808$Gx4.56891@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>,
    > Biz <biznospam@notatt.net> writes
    > >
    > >"Groupwriting" <groupwriting@totalise.co.uk> wrote in message
    > >news:149e9684.0407050907.1964e69f@posting.google.com...
    > >> I've put together a history documentary on a DVD which was created
    > >> with DVDLab. I have made seperate versions of it for PAL and NTSC and
    > >> packaged in different boxes.
    > >>
    > >> I have noticed some DVDs now being packaged as 'all regions' that will
    > >> play on both PAL and NTSC players. I'm a bit confused how anyone can
    > >> do this as they are seperate standards. Is there a main menu that you
    > >> need to select one or the other standard when the DVD runs?
    > >>
    > >> Also is there any easy way of combining the files I already have onto
    > >> one disk? It would be great if I could because it would cause less
    > >> confusion in shops I have the two different types stocked in.
    > >
    > >Typcially all region or the technically incorrect "region 0" dvds are
    NTSC
    > >material.
    > >
    > >Why? Because most of the PAL world has mutli-standard televisions,
    whereas
    > >NOrth America is almost entirely NTSC only sets. Also alot of the
    players
    > >sold in the PAL regions also do PAL to NTSC and vice-versa conversion as
    > >well.
    > >
    > The actual data on the disk is not NTSC or PAL or anything else, it's
    > just MPEG.
    >
    > NTSC and PAL is encoding of the analogue video output, done by the DVD
    > player when it replays the disk, to suit the user's TV.
    >
    > What you say above is true for VHS, where the video on the tape IS pal
    > or ntsc encoded and VCRs can convert it.
    > --
    > Tim Mitchell

    You have to encode you original MPEG for one of the two standards, otherwise
    it won't be up to DVD specs and will most likely be rejected by your
    authoring software, not to mention a lot of players. I believe Region 0 DVDs
    are encoded to NTSC specs.
  4. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    In article <cce5k9$5vt$1@titan.btinternet.com>, Adam H
    <dfghjkl@fghjkl.ur> writes
    >
    >"Tim Mitchell" <timng@sabretechnology.co.uk> wrote in message
    >news:aMdP6CPs8o6AFAZp@tega.co.uk...
    >> In article <hcmGc.198808$Gx4.56891@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>,
    >> Biz <biznospam@notatt.net> writes
    >> >
    >> >Typcially all region or the technically incorrect "region 0" dvds are
    >NTSC
    >> >material.
    >> >
    >> >Why? Because most of the PAL world has mutli-standard televisions,
    >whereas
    >> >NOrth America is almost entirely NTSC only sets. Also alot of the
    >players
    >> >sold in the PAL regions also do PAL to NTSC and vice-versa conversion as
    >> >well.
    >> >
    >> The actual data on the disk is not NTSC or PAL or anything else, it's
    >> just MPEG.
    >>
    >> NTSC and PAL is encoding of the analogue video output, done by the DVD
    >> player when it replays the disk, to suit the user's TV.
    >>
    >> What you say above is true for VHS, where the video on the tape IS pal
    >> or ntsc encoded and VCRs can convert it.
    >
    >You have to encode you original MPEG for one of the two standards, otherwise
    >it won't be up to DVD specs and will most likely be rejected by your
    >authoring software, not to mention a lot of players. I believe Region 0 DVDs
    >are encoded to NTSC specs.
    >
    OK, but I think this is only the frame rate, i.e. 525/60Hz or 625/50Hz.
    It hasn't really got anything to do with the PAL or NTSC standards which
    apply to analogue composite video only. It's not correct to say that the
    DVD player does PAL to NTSC conversion, as it was never PAL or NTSC in
    the first place.
    --
    Tim Mitchell
  5. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    > >You have to encode you original MPEG for one of the two standards,
    otherwise
    > >it won't be up to DVD specs and will most likely be rejected by your
    > >authoring software, not to mention a lot of players. I believe Region 0
    DVDs
    > >are encoded to NTSC specs.
    > >
    > OK, but I think this is only the frame rate, i.e. 525/60Hz or 625/50Hz.
    > It hasn't really got anything to do with the PAL or NTSC standards which
    > apply to analogue composite video only. It's not correct to say that the
    > DVD player does PAL to NTSC conversion, as it was never PAL or NTSC in
    > the first place.

    The MPEG resolution is different. PAL is 576 horizontal, NTSC is 480.
    Technicalities aside, these formats are specified as NTSC and PAL formats in
    the DVD specs, and if you create an off-spec file, say 640x480/25fps, it
    will be rejected. You are talking about the final analog standard, but you
    still need to create a DVD complaint MPEG file to begin with.
  6. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    > You have to encode you original MPEG for one of the two standards,
    otherwise
    > it won't be up to DVD specs and will most likely be rejected by your
    > authoring software, not to mention a lot of players. I believe Region 0
    DVDs
    > are encoded to NTSC specs.

    Is there a spec which says Region 0 DVDs can't be PAL????
  7. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    > > You have to encode you original MPEG for one of the two standards,
    > otherwise
    > > it won't be up to DVD specs and will most likely be rejected by your
    > > authoring software, not to mention a lot of players. I believe Region 0
    > DVDs
    > > are encoded to NTSC specs.
    >
    > Is there a spec which says Region 0 DVDs can't be PAL????

    I am not sure, but all the Region 0's I have seen were NTSC. You can
    definitely author a Region 0 to be PAL, but it might not be as compatible.
  8. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    "Damien Evans" <guest@anon.com> wrote in message
    news:2kvm7fF6pepmU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > Is there a spec which says Region 0 DVDs can't be PAL????
    >
    >

    Sure it COULD be PAL, but if you want it to be most compatible, you make it
    NTSC, as I stated in an earlier post on this thread most of the PAL part of
    the world can play NTSC, whereas the NTSC world can't typically play PAL.
  9. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    On Tue, 6 Jul 2004 15:17:13 +0000 (UTC), "Adam H" <dfghjkl@fghjkl.ur>
    wrote:

    >> > You have to encode you original MPEG for one of the two standards,
    >> otherwise
    >> > it won't be up to DVD specs and will most likely be rejected by your
    >> > authoring software, not to mention a lot of players. I believe Region 0
    >> DVDs
    >> > are encoded to NTSC specs.
    >>
    >> Is there a spec which says Region 0 DVDs can't be PAL????
    >
    >I am not sure, but all the Region 0's I have seen were NTSC. You can
    >definitely author a Region 0 to be PAL, but it might not be as compatible.
    >
    >
    I am living in Europe and I have seen a lot of "Region 0" Dvd
    that were in PAL.

    But I am also sure that almost 99 percents of the Dvd players in
    Europe can read "Region 0" - NTSC discs without any problem.
  10. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.video.dvd.software (More info?)

    "Biz" <biznospam@notatt.net> wrote in message news:<QYzGc.202979$Gx4.23627@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>...
    > "Damien Evans" <guest@anon.com> wrote in message
    > news:2kvm7fF6pepmU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > > Is there a spec which says Region 0 DVDs can't be PAL????
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Sure it COULD be PAL, but if you want it to be most compatible, you make it
    > NTSC, as I stated in an earlier post on this thread most of the PAL part of
    > the world can play NTSC, whereas the NTSC world can't typically play PAL.

    It' a good idea but in practice doesn't always work.

    As an experiment I gave two people an NTSC disk to put in their PAL
    players. One wasn't accepted and the other, the on-screen colours
    were funny. The PAL version played fine on their PAL Players and the
    NTSC play fine on NTSC players I've tried. When playing and NTSC disk
    on my PAL player the screen gets stretched to fix the different screen
    size.

    I couldn't see how someone could sell an NTSC disk in places that use
    PAL players. I wish I had bought one when I saw them.
  11. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On 7 Jul 2004 14:33:45 -0700, groupwriting@totalise.co.uk
    (Groupwriting) wrote:

    >It' a good idea but in practice doesn't always work.

    Yes, but many times because people do not know what the "setup" button
    is for. Their DVD player may be able to play NTSC, but needs be
    configured to do so.
  12. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Bariloche <bariloche@bariloche.com> wrote in message news:<koupe0ler9r8q4u3fa692lv0tpafi914jn@4ax.com>...
    > On 7 Jul 2004 14:33:45 -0700, groupwriting@totalise.co.uk
    > (Groupwriting) wrote:
    >
    > >It' a good idea but in practice doesn't always work.
    >
    > Yes, but many times because people do not know what the "setup" button
    > is for. Their DVD player may be able to play NTSC, but needs be
    > configured to do so.

    My DVD Player has 3 format modes: PAL, NTSC or Auto.
    When set to NTSC or Auto, a NTSC Disk displays video in black and
    white. Someone mentioned in a previous thread that although the DVD
    player plays NTSC disks the TV also needs to be compatible. Mine is a
    Mitsubishi about 2yrs old and must not be compatible.
Ask a new question

Read More

Tuner Cards DVD Video Graphics