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Huge 'Pixels' on TV monitor from still files

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Anonymous
a b C Monitor
July 18, 2004 9:48:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hi There--

This is the first time I've done anything with video processing. I've
searched in google groups, but no luck with the search terms that I
was using. If there are any previous posts that deal with this that
you know of, please let me know.

Still photo. Did an animation in Flash that ends in the photo for
sixteen seconds static just on the photo. Exported to PNG sequence.
Imported into AfterEffects. Converted to AVI file for import into
Premiere.

Before importing the photo into Flash, I did some retouching in
Photoshop. The photo is black and white. I added a black to
transparent gradient in the area that seems to be the affected. I read
that the palette for TV is more limited that computer monitors, but I
didn't think that a black and white photo would be a problem.

Using the unretouched photo does not produce huge 'pixels'.

Tried exporting the flash to a pict sequence. This also produced the
large 'pixels'.

The Premiere software and the TV monitor are both on a windows
computer. I'm on a mac and I don't have a TV monitor attached to it so
I can't tell what will work. I can get hold of one, though.

I'm hoping that there will be an easier way to fix this so that I
don't have to do the breakout box thing with the TV.

I hope that all of you are well and having a great time making
wonderful video!

Cheers,

Lee
July 19, 2004 6:18:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Webslinger2300@hotmail.com (Webslinger2300) wrote:

>Hi There--
>
>This is the first time I've done anything with video processing. I've
>searched in google groups, but no luck with the search terms that I
>was using. If there are any previous posts that deal with this that
>you know of, please let me know.
>
>Still photo. Did an animation in Flash that ends in the photo for
>sixteen seconds static just on the photo. Exported to PNG sequence.
>Imported into AfterEffects. Converted to AVI file for import into
>Premiere.
>
>Before importing the photo into Flash, I did some retouching in
>Photoshop. The photo is black and white. I added a black to
>transparent gradient in the area that seems to be the affected. I read
>that the palette for TV is more limited that computer monitors, but I
>didn't think that a black and white photo would be a problem.
>
>Using the unretouched photo does not produce huge 'pixels'.
>
>Tried exporting the flash to a pict sequence. This also produced the
>large 'pixels'.
>
>The Premiere software and the TV monitor are both on a windows
>computer. I'm on a mac and I don't have a TV monitor attached to it so
>I can't tell what will work. I can get hold of one, though.
>
>I'm hoping that there will be an easier way to fix this so that I
>don't have to do the breakout box thing with the TV.
>
>I hope that all of you are well and having a great time making
>wonderful video!
>
>Cheers,
>
>Lee

Can you provide more details such as the size in pixels of the final
photo and the photo format jpg, tiff, bmp, etc
Are you creating a video DVD and playing the result on a desktop DVD
player to view on TV?
It could be a problem if the resulting picture was small in size in
pixel dimensions.

Regards Brian
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
July 19, 2004 6:18:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Brian Said:
>
> Can you provide more details such as the size in pixels of the final
> photo and the photo format jpg, tiff, bmp, etc
> Are you creating a video DVD and playing the result on a desktop DVD
> player to view on TV?
> It could be a problem if the resulting picture was small in size in
> pixel dimensions.
>
> Regards Brian

Hi Brian, thanks for replying.

Whether the pictures were part of an original PICT sequence or a PNG
sequence before being converted to an AVI file, seems to make no
difference. I didn't use the other options, like JPG, because they're
lossy formats.

The only part of the picture that's affected is where I added the
black gradient at the bottom of the photo. Other parts of the photo
where I retouched don't have the large 'pixels'. (big squares of flat
color, sort of like when people want to censor out naughty bits - I'm
sure there's a better word than 'pixels'. Pixelated?)

So I don't think it's a screen resolution thing because the rest of
the photo is fine.

The 'pixels' are between half and a quarter inch.

I've just found out that part of the picture where the midtones are
has a blue tint. They didn't tell me this yesterday.

I'm wondering whether the pure blacks that I used exceeded the range
of TV colors.

Any thoughts?

Thanks so much for replying. The editor leaves town tomorrow.

Cheers,

Lee
Related resources
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
July 21, 2004 11:41:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm (More info?)

Georges Preddivous wrote:

>
> Salutations Lee!
>
> Video cameras were not made to capture still images. Buy yourself a
> high end digital still camera like the Sigma SD10 and you will have
> better results. Sigma digital cameras contain the highly superior
> Foveon images sensor which is the only sensor that records images in 3
> colour layers like film.

This message brought to you by Georges Preddivous, Sales rep for Sigma
aka Junk.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
July 22, 2004 12:41:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm (More info?)

High priced 3 megapixel camera, if you count like all the rest of the
companies.

"Georges Preddivous" <preddivous@aemail4u.com> wrote in message
news:11e7f152.0407210255.5889a119@posting.google.com...
> Webslinger2300@hotmail.com (Webslinger2300) wrote in message
news:<cb14adfa.0407181648.60657818@posting.google.com>...
> > Hi There--
> >
> > This is the first time I've done anything with video processing. I've
> > searched in google groups, but no luck with the search terms that I
> > was using. If there are any previous posts that deal with this that
> > you know of, please let me know.
> >
> > Still photo. Did an animation in Flash that ends in the photo for
> > sixteen seconds static just on the photo. Exported to PNG sequence.
> > Imported into AfterEffects. Converted to AVI file for import into
> > Premiere.
> >
> > Before importing the photo into Flash, I did some retouching in
> > Photoshop. The photo is black and white. I added a black to
> > transparent gradient in the area that seems to be the affected. I read
> > that the palette for TV is more limited that computer monitors, but I
> > didn't think that a black and white photo would be a problem.
> >
> > Using the unretouched photo does not produce huge 'pixels'.
> >
> > Tried exporting the flash to a pict sequence. This also produced the
> > large 'pixels'.
> >
> > The Premiere software and the TV monitor are both on a windows
> > computer. I'm on a mac and I don't have a TV monitor attached to it so
> > I can't tell what will work. I can get hold of one, though.
> >
> > I'm hoping that there will be an easier way to fix this so that I
> > don't have to do the breakout box thing with the TV.
> >
> > I hope that all of you are well and having a great time making
> > wonderful video!
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Lee
>
> Salutations Lee!
>
> Video cameras were not made to capture still images. Buy yourself a
> high end digital still camera like the Sigma SD10 and you will have
> better results. Sigma digital cameras contain the highly superior
> Foveon images sensor which is the only sensor that records images in 3
> colour layers like film.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
July 22, 2004 1:40:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm (More info?)

"Gymmy Bob" <nospamming@bite.me> wrote in message news:<hradnc1D-s_YjWLd4p2dnA@golden.net>...
> High priced 3 megapixel camera, if you count like all the rest of the
> companies.
>
> "Georges Preddivous" <preddivous@aemail4u.com> wrote in message
> news:11e7f152.0407210255.5889a119@posting.google.com...

> > Video cameras were not made to capture still images. Buy yourself a
> > high end digital still camera like the Sigma SD10 and you will have
> > better results. Sigma digital cameras contain the highly superior
> > Foveon images sensor which is the only sensor that records images in 3
> > colour layers like film.

Hi and thanks for answering my post!

I apologize for not being clear on this.

This is the title sequence for a documentary for an old house. This
was an old black and white picture of an old house which I retouched
in photoshop, saved as a PICT file, imported it into Flash, animated a
sequence in front of it. Then I saved the whole thing as a PNG
sequence and imported the sequence into AfterEffects and saved as an
AVI file.

You can view a very sped-up Flash version of it here:
http://www.leevodra.com/ArtvisionAni/ .

If it starts weird for you, hit refresh and it should work fine.
Parts of the building and the sky were also retouched, but didn't turn
blue or get the big censor pixellation.

It's the black part at the bottom that gets the big pixels. It's the
mid-tone part of the garden that turns blue.

After being turned into an AVI file, the photo looks fine on a
computer monitor - both Mac and PC, but is affected only when it's
shown in a TV monitor.

The animated part, which is also pure black, seems unaffected.

The unretouched photo is not affected - it looks fine on the TV
monitor, but it's a damaged photo and has a lot of age artifacts on
it.

I hope this is more clear.

Thanks to everyone who reads this and answers,

Lee
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
July 28, 2004 1:52:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm (More info?)

Any other thoughts?

Please?

Lee
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
July 29, 2004 1:47:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,alt.comp.periphs.dcameras,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm (More info?)

Webslinger2300 wrote:
>
> After being turned into an AVI file, the photo looks fine on a
> computer monitor - both Mac and PC, but is affected only when it's
> shown in a TV monitor.
>
> The animated part, which is also pure black, seems unaffected.
>
> The unretouched photo is not affected - it looks fine on the TV
> monitor, but it's a damaged photo and has a lot of age artifacts on
> it.

Without knowing the specifics of the output device you are using to get to
video, it sounds like it might be a problem of mis-matched luminance levels,
which is common when going between computers and video.

What you might like to try is in After Effects, add an effect layer over
your comp and apply a Levels effect and set the *output* levels to 16 for
shadow and 235 for highlights. On your computer monitor, this will make the
blacks look a little grey, and the whites a little off-white, however when
it's converted to video and on a TV screen, you'll find that you'll get
proper blacks and whites, and you'll get a nice smooth transition at the
bottom of your image. If the blue is looking strange, you could also apply
another effect to the effect layer to de-saturate the comp and make it pure
black and white.

Hope that helps.

Russ.
!