SVCD to DVD without re-encoding

Archived from groups: alt.video.dvd.software,alt.video.dvd.tech,rec.video.desktop,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

I have some SVCD movies, that are usually 2 or 3 SVCD mpg files
Is it possible to get them onto DVD as a DVD compliant form?

I gather if I "make" a DVD it will re-encode as the SVCD res and bitrate
isnt DVD compliant?

Can I make a SVCD on a DVD?

Tks
5 answers Last reply
More about svcd encoding
  1. Archived from groups: alt.video.dvd.software,alt.video.dvd.tech,rec.video.desktop,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

    "Tony" <tdale@xtra.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:SV0Nc.5115$N77.290590@news.xtra.co.nz...
    > I have some SVCD movies, that are usually 2 or 3 SVCD mpg files
    > Is it possible to get them onto DVD as a DVD compliant form?
    >
    > I gather if I "make" a DVD it will re-encode as the SVCD res and bitrate
    > isnt DVD compliant?

    Absolutely.

    >
    > Can I make a SVCD on a DVD?
    >
    > Tks


    Sure. Re-encode them.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.video.dvd.software,alt.video.dvd.tech,rec.video.desktop,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

    On 26.7.2004 07:47, Tony wrote:

    > I have some SVCD movies, that are usually 2 or 3 SVCD mpg files
    > Is it possible to get them onto DVD as a DVD compliant form?

    You could use DVDLab (not free unfortunately).
    http://www.dvdlab.net/dvdlab/index.html

    It can make a DVD from an SVCD mpg-file *without* re-encoding. Just
    import the .mpg file, DVDLab will split it up into a video file (.m2v)
    and an audio file (.mp2). The audio stream of an SVCD is usually 44,1
    kHz and it's a *must* to convert this to 48 kHz, but DVDLab will also do
    this job.

    DVDLab will warn you that the video is not DVD compliant, but most
    players will play the DVD anyway. My player also accepts MPEG1-files
    (VCD) on a DVD, it also doesn't care about mixing PAL and NTSC videos.
    You have to try whether your DVD-standalone is as uncritical about
    standards as mine, but most newer players are.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.video.dvd.software,alt.video.dvd.tech,rec.video.desktop,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

    "Hans Schlager" <trash@service-partner.at> wrote in message
    news:4m9Nc.1528192$ef4.180466@news.easynews.com...
    > On 26.7.2004 07:47, Tony wrote:
    >
    > > I have some SVCD movies, that are usually 2 or 3 SVCD mpg files
    > > Is it possible to get them onto DVD as a DVD compliant form?
    >
    > You could use DVDLab (not free unfortunately).
    > http://www.dvdlab.net/dvdlab/index.html
    >
    > It can make a DVD from an SVCD mpg-file *without* re-encoding. Just
    > import the .mpg file, DVDLab will split it up into a video file (.m2v)
    > and an audio file (.mp2). The audio stream of an SVCD is usually 44,1
    > kHz and it's a *must* to convert this to 48 kHz, but DVDLab will also do
    > this job.
    >
    > DVDLab will warn you that the video is not DVD compliant, but most
    > players will play the DVD anyway. My player also accepts MPEG1-files
    > (VCD) on a DVD, it also doesn't care about mixing PAL and NTSC videos.
    > You have to try whether your DVD-standalone is as uncritical about
    > standards as mine, but most newer players are.

    The process you describe I call re-encoding. Why am I wrong here?
  4. Archived from groups: alt.video.dvd.software,alt.video.dvd.tech,rec.video.desktop,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

    In effect a 4.7Gb SVCD made up of SVCD mpg clips?
  5. Archived from groups: alt.video.dvd.software,alt.video.dvd.tech,rec.video.desktop,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

    On 27.7.2004 01:03, luminos wrote:

    >> It can make a DVD from an SVCD mpg-file *without* re-encoding. Just
    >> import the .mpg file, DVDLab will split it up into a video file (.m2v)
    >> and an audio file (.mp2). The audio stream of an SVCD is usually 44,1
    >> kHz and it's a *must* to convert this to 48 kHz, but DVDLab will also do
    >> this job.

    > The process you describe I call re-encoding. Why am I wrong here?

    It re-encodes the audio, but leaves the video untouched.
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