Who has built their own Tivo or PVR?

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Who here has built their own Tivo or PVR unit?

And..... has it worked out as well as say buying a
pre-made DVD/HDD unit such as one in link below?

http://tinyurl.com/7xj6x
125 answers Last reply
More about built tivo
  1. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me6@privacy.net wrote:

    > Who here has built their own Tivo or PVR unit?

    I've set up my own MythTV machine.


    > And..... has it worked out as well as say buying a
    > pre-made DVD/HDD unit such as one in link below?
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/7xj6x

    Who knows. I've never used the above item.
    MythTV rocks, though.


    -WD
  2. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >Who knows. I've never used the above item.
    >MythTV rocks, though.

    Questions abt Myth....

    What vidoe/PVR card are you using?

    Is the Hauppage line OK?

    And..... does Myth allow setups for recording JUST like a VCR by using
    start and stop times?

    I realize it can get fancier than that by using online guides and
    such.... but I also NEED basic VCR-like programming with start/stop
    and channel entry.

    Also..... how do you play back recording on a standard TV? Or can
    it?

    Do you use a media hub to playback to reg TV?
  3. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me6@privacy.net wrote:

    > Questions abt Myth....
    >
    > What vidoe/PVR card are you using?

    It's an OEM PVR250. That's the preferred card for Myth. It cost
    something like $75 just over a year ago.


    > Is the Hauppage line OK?

    See above. Any of the ivtv supported cards should be fine.


    > And..... does Myth allow setups for recording JUST like a VCR by using
    > start and stop times?

    Yes, but I've only used this feature in testing. (Much easier to
    search by program name)


    > Also..... how do you play back recording on a standard TV? Or can
    > it?

    Generally MythTV machines are built with video cards that have TV-Out.
    For the best quality, the PVR-350 has integrated MPEG2 decoding and
    TV-out.


    > Do you use a media hub to playback to reg TV?

    Not sure what that is, so I'd say "no" to that.


    -WD
  4. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >> And..... does Myth allow setups for recording JUST like a VCR by using
    >> start and stop times?
    >
    >Yes, but I've only used this feature in testing. (Much easier to
    >search by program name)

    Oh yes Im sure it is MUCH easier programming by name.... but I
    absolutely must have the old style VCR-like start/stop timer as well.

    I may be using a TV antenna only in future and not have any internet
    connection.... hence the need for start/stop timer recordings ala VCR.

    Again..... Myth CAN do this?

    >> Also..... how do you play back recording on a standard TV? Or can
    >> it?
    >
    >Generally MythTV machines are built with video cards that have TV-Out.
    > For the best quality, the PVR-350 has integrated MPEG2 decoding and
    >TV-out.

    So the 250 does NOT have TV out then? And one must then install a
    separate TV out card if using the 250?

    Whereas the 350 has it ALL built in....TV out, etc?

    If yes on both accounts...... would you recommend getting it all in
    one card such as the 325? Or is there some advantage to using the 250
    and additional TV out card?

    >> Do you use a media hub to playback to reg TV?
    >
    >Not sure what that is, so I'd say "no" to that.

    Something like this. See ink

    http://tinyurl.com/4anud
  5. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me6@privacy.net wrote:

    > I may be using a TV antenna only in future and not have any internet
    > connection.... hence the need for start/stop timer recordings ala VCR.
    >
    > Again..... Myth CAN do this?

    Absolutely.


    > So the 250 does NOT have TV out then? And one must then install a
    > separate TV out card if using the 250?

    Correct. If your video card doesn't have TV-out, then you'll either
    need to switch it out or get an add-in card for TV-out.


    > Whereas the 350 has it ALL built in....TV out, etc?
    >
    > If yes on both accounts...... would you recommend getting it all in
    > one card such as the 325? Or is there some advantage to using the 250
    > and additional TV out card?

    Yes. The 350 has the advantage of unsurpassed quality output, all in
    one card. But at a higher cost.

    When I set up my MythTV machine, the TV-out support on the 350 was
    highly experimental if even supported at all. But the driver
    development has made it quite a viable solution lately.


    -WD
  6. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Boring to do nowadays...

    Almost any of the Windows Media PCs, PCs with ATI All-In-Wonder cards,
    and so forth will do the basics of time shifting, TV recording, creating
    burnable files, etc. quite easily. The ATI AIW with remote control
    models are super-easy to use -- acts just like any other PVR, and you
    can drop one in anyday for a Tivo, etc - with their free EasyLook software.

    On this note, lots of work has been done on alternative platforms and
    OSs, such as MythTV for Linux, Xbox Media Center, etc.
  7. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >Yes. The 350 has the advantage of unsurpassed quality output, all in
    >one card. But at a higher cost.
    >
    >When I set up my MythTV machine, the TV-out support on the 350 was
    >highly experimental if even supported at all. But the driver
    >development has made it quite a viable solution lately.

    OK Will great info!!

    But just to recap and make sure...... YOU do own the
    350, right?

    And.... do you use any kind of remote with this card
    such as that FireFly thingie they sale?
  8. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me@privacy.net wrote:

    > But just to recap and make sure...... YOU do own the
    > 350, right?

    No, I have a 250, as I stated yesterday.


    > And.... do you use any kind of remote with this card
    > such as that FireFly thingie they sale?

    It's an X10 Lola RF remote.
    http://www.x10.com/products/lola_remote.htm
    X10 was running some kind of special at the time and it was free. (just
    pay $5 or something for shipping)


    -WD
  9. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    > Who here has built their own Tivo or PVR unit?

    I have a PC running Beyond-TV as the user-interface with a PVR-250-BTV
    encoder card and a FireFly remote. This is relatively easy to build as
    soon as I find a workaround with the problem in the FireFly driver
    (that prevented me from getting access to COM port for dial-up
    connection).

    There is one catch though:
    If you only have one PC and you have multiple persons in your
    family that want to view videos, you will find that you will be
    competing with your family members for the use of that PC. You will
    likely need another PC for non-PVR use, or get a media-network-player;
    as of me, I have none; therefore, people in my family need to take
    turn using the PC -- Oh well...

    Jay Chan
  10. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >
    >There is one catch though:
    > If you only have one PC and you have multiple persons in your
    >family that want to view videos, you will find that you will be
    >competing with your family members for the use of that PC. You will
    >likely need another PC for non-PVR use, or get a media-network-player;

    Why?

    Are you viewing your TV on the PC itself.....and NOT a
    regular TV?
  11. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    > Are you viewing your TV on the PC itself.....and NOT a
    > regular TV?

    A PC can do TV and a whole lot more!

    eg. Buy and small Shuttle XPC PC.

    http://sys.us.shuttle.com/

    Attach to the latest big-screen LCD/Plasma monitor.

    Now, you have TIVO & TV.

    Load up the Shuttle with MP3 audio files from your CDs, and you have
    a jukebox as well.

    Load up the Shuttle with all of your movies, and you now have a video
    jukebox.

    Load up all of your pictures from your digital camera, and now you've
    got your entire photo album viewable on a big screen.

    Hook it up to the Internet, and you can now surf the Internet and
    watch TV/Video at the same time on the same big-screen from a comfy couch.

    All in the size of a small bread-box. No need for all those
    traditional pieces of AV equipment, like the tape player, CD player, DVD
    player, etc, etc.
  12. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    In article <ce9e4s$gnq$1@news.service.uci.edu>,
    David Chien <chiendh@uci.edu> wrote:

    > > Are you viewing your TV on the PC itself.....and NOT a
    > > regular TV?
    >
    > A PC can do TV and a whole lot more!
    >
    > eg. Buy and small Shuttle XPC PC.
    >
    > http://sys.us.shuttle.com/
    >
    > Attach to the latest big-screen LCD/Plasma monitor.
    >
    > Now, you have TIVO & TV.
    >
    > Load up the Shuttle with MP3 audio files from your CDs, and you have
    > a jukebox as well.
    >
    > Load up the Shuttle with all of your movies, and you now have a video
    > jukebox.
    >
    > Load up all of your pictures from your digital camera, and now you've
    > got your entire photo album viewable on a big screen.
    >
    > Hook it up to the Internet, and you can now surf the Internet and
    > watch TV/Video at the same time on the same big-screen from a comfy couch.
    >
    > All in the size of a small bread-box. No need for all those
    > traditional pieces of AV equipment, like the tape player, CD player, DVD
    > player, etc, etc.
    >

    And the best part is when someone steals your Shuttle XPC PC they will
    have stolen every memory you own.
  13. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me@privacy.net wrote in message news:<u8pfg0lvg5l5u23ju03te13oqqge97f801@4ax.com>...
    > >
    > >There is one catch though:
    > > If you only have one PC and you have multiple persons in your
    > >family that want to view videos, you will find that you will be
    > >competing with your family members for the use of that PC. You will
    > >likely need another PC for non-PVR use, or get a media-network-player;
    >
    > Why?
    >
    > Are you viewing your TV on the PC itself.....and NOT a
    > regular TV?

    I am viewing on my TV, not on the PC monitor. But that doesn't really
    matter. The reason is that the CPU is the one decoding MPEG (at least
    that is how it is being done in Beyond-TV), and this is a CPU
    intensive process. If someone is viewing TV via Beyond-TV, I cannot
    use the same PC to edit video clips -- too slow in my 1.5-GHz P4 PC.
    The solution seems to come down to:

    - Not allow multiple users to use the same PC (this is what I am
    doing now).

    - Get a second PC or a media network player (this is what I will do).

    - Get another front-end program that can take advantage of hardware
    MPEG decoder (Beyond-TV cannot do this).

    Jay Chan
  14. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >
    > A PC can do TV and a whole lot more!
    >
    > eg. Buy and small Shuttle XPC PC.
    >
    > http://sys.us.shuttle.com/
    >
    > Attach to the latest big-screen LCD/Plasma monitor.

    Any particular Shuttle model you like best for this
    use?

    Also.....what DVD drive/burner do you use?
  15. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me6@privacy.net wrote:

    > Who here has built their own Tivo or PVR unit?
    >
    > And..... has it worked out as well as say buying a
    > pre-made DVD/HDD unit such as one in link below?
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/7xj6x

    I have, and yeah, it works GREAT. Not only that, but mine has a 250 GB
    drive, can access internet radio stations, movies on demand, play DVDs,
    burn DVDs, will play photo slide shows from a card reader, play MP3s
    over the network, and let me move the recorded shows to any PC on my
    network. In addition, *I*, not Tivo, determine when and what software
    upgrades will or won't be installed. I can add any number of tuner cards
    - any box with only one tuner is pretty much useless in a family
    situation - currently I'm using two PVR-250 tuner/encoder cards. And I
    can schedule recordings remotely via a web browser.

    And the whole thing looks nothing like a "PC", runs solely from a remote
    control, and it took all of 10 minutes to install and configure the
    software. No geek degree required (although I admit to being one).
  16. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me@privacy.net wrote:

    > >
    > >There is one catch though:
    > > If you only have one PC and you have multiple persons in your
    > >family that want to view videos, you will find that you will be
    > >competing with your family members for the use of that PC. You will
    > >likely need another PC for non-PVR use, or get a media-network-player;
    >
    > Why?
    >
    > Are you viewing your TV on the PC itself.....and NOT a
    > regular TV?

    I have my media center PC connected to a TV in the living room and run it
    exclusively via a remote control (Firefly), although I did configure a VNC
    server on it for occasional remote administration chores.

    It's real easy, almost all video cards today have "TV out". The motherboard
    I used for my media center box, an Asus P4R800-V Deluxe, has onboard ATI
    Radeon graphics and TV-out built in, including S-Video and composite analog
    connectors. It works GREAT for this purpose.

    http://usa.asus.com/products/mb/socket478/p4r800-v/overview.htm

    The *only* add-in cards in the box are two PVR-250 tuner cards. 5.1 audio
    (and SPDIF connector), gigabit Ethernet, Firewire, are all built in to the
    motherboard. It's perfect for media-center use. It runs for weeks without
    being issues.

    I'm beta testing both BeyondTV 3.5 and Beyond Media 1.0 on it, and it's
    been extremely stable.
  17. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Jay Chan wrote:

    > I am viewing on my TV, not on the PC monitor. But that doesn't really
    > matter. The reason is that the CPU is the one decoding MPEG (at least
    > that is how it is being done in Beyond-TV), and this is a CPU
    > intensive process. If someone is viewing TV via Beyond-TV, I cannot
    > use the same PC to edit video clips -- too slow in my 1.5-GHz P4 PC.
    >

    It's not so much a CPU issue, as a hard drive issue. It's really hard to view
    DVD-quality mpeg-2 and to edit from the same hard drive regardless of CPU.

    Your *best* bet is to not use your DVR box for editing at all. copy the files over the
    network to another machine and edit on that one. Keep the DVR box as a purely recording
    and viewing box, nothing more, and you'll be fine.

    Network media players are OK, I have a Hauppauge Media-MVP, which I wouldn't recommend
    to anyone...but your best bet is to dedicate the box running BeyondTV as a DVR and
    nothing more.
  18. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >Network media players are OK, I have a Hauppauge Media-MVP, which I wouldn't recommend
    >to anyone...but your best bet is to dedicate the box running BeyondTV as a DVR and
    >nothing more.

    Why do you not like the Media MVP box?

    I thought I read decent reviews of it.

    My thoughts were to get the 250 card...... keep the PC
    in another room.....and run video off that PC to TV in
    living rom via the MVP box

    Not a good idea?

    Is it a better idea to have the dedicated PC/PVR box
    right NEXT to TV in living room....and use it that way?
    And forget abt media hubs like the MVP?
  19. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >And the whole thing looks nothing like a "PC", runs solely from a remote
    >control, and it took all of 10 minutes to install and configure the
    >software. No geek degree required (although I admit to being one).

    What type of PC did you use as a "base" to build this
    PVR with? Did you use a small form factor PC like
    the Shuttle?
  20. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    > Attach to the latest big-screen LCD/Plasma monitor.

    Im curious...... what LCD/plasma monitor are you using
    with YOUR Shuttle?

    Thanks!
  21. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me@privacy.net wrote:

    > >Network media players are OK, I have a Hauppauge Media-MVP, which I wouldn't recommend
    > >to anyone...but your best bet is to dedicate the box running BeyondTV as a DVR and
    > >nothing more.
    >
    > Why do you not like the Media MVP box?
    >
    > I thought I read decent reviews of it.
    >

    Well, here's the thing about "reviews".

    People who write "reviews" don't actually own the things, never paid any money for them,
    and if they work "once" that's good enough. In some cases, "reviewers" never even test
    them, they just cut and paste from press releases.

    To be fair - video quality is truly outstanding. *IF* you can get it to work. The signal
    levels apparently don't meet NTSC standards and it doesn't work with all TVs (my Sony has
    no problems but I had to run it through a buffer to get it to work with my Zenith).

    Don't even think about using one on a wireless network. 'Nuff said about that.

    Many people report problems with them on wired networks. Mine seems to work OK on a 100 Mb
    Ethernet switch.

    Forget what the instructions say about getting one to work with a crossover. Mine will not
    work, period, using a crossover cable and direct connection, even though I have link and
    can ping it.

    Hauppauge is *glacially* slow about firmware updates. They haven't updated the beta drivers
    that support Divx since May.

    Speaking of Divx, forget using anything other than 640x480 files, their software isn't
    smart enough to scale it - never mind that it's your PC providing all the processing power.

    Fast forward/rewind does not work. Period. 'Nuff said.

    Skipping forward in 30 second increments works, but if you skip too far forward, often you
    can't go back.

    If you stop watching a file and play it later, the software remembers where you left off.

    As long as you don't reboot your PC or restart the service. Otherwise forget it.

    And there are no on-screen indicators to tell you where in the program you are or how much
    time you have left, etc.

    If all you want is a no frills "just play the file" device, the MediaMVP ain't bad.

    But if you want it to work as well as a $30 VCR, you'll be greatly disappointed.

    You can find more info here : http://www.shspvr.com/forum/ (scroll down to the MVP
    section).


    >
    > My thoughts were to get the 250 card...... keep the PC
    > in another room.....and run video off that PC to TV in
    > living rom via the MVP box
    >
    > Not a good idea?
    >
    > Is it a better idea to have the dedicated PC/PVR box
    > right NEXT to TV in living room....and use it that way?
    > And forget abt media hubs like the MVP?

    That's the way I prefer.

    The on-screen interface of BeyondTV is just AWESOME. Together with the Firefly remote and
    the software that ship with it, they make a PC into a real entertainment center When the
    in-laws come, we just pick up the remote control to some them the latest pictures or home
    videos, for example. Everything is either on a PC on the network or there on the DVR box.
    It's really handy.

    Your other option is to simply burn the files to DVD and use the sneaker net and set-top
    DVD player, but that's not as convenient. I used that method for a while, before I built a
    dedicated DVR box. Now I'd be lost without it.

    Anyway, by the time you get a *good* media hub, you'd have paid for a media center box
    anyway.
  22. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me@privacy.net wrote:

    > >And the whole thing looks nothing like a "PC", runs solely from a remote
    > >control, and it took all of 10 minutes to install and configure the
    > >software. No geek degree required (although I admit to being one).
    >
    > What type of PC did you use as a "base" to build this
    > PVR with? Did you use a small form factor PC like
    > the Shuttle?

    Well the Asus P4R800-V Deluxe board I used as the heart of the box is
    standard ATX, so I used a regular size case, that's roughly the same size as
    my Onkyo receiver, and it looks right at home in my entertainment unit.

    The case I used is a SilverStone SST-LC03-B case, which looks like a high end
    audio amp more than a PC (no exposed connectors, drive bays, etc).

    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=11-163-016&depa=1

    Then I used a silent Zalman 300W power supply (it truly is silent), and
    Zalman alimunum/copper heat sink (with it's fan set to it's slowest
    setting). The box is very quiet, the clock ticking on the wall makes louder
    noise.
  23. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >Well the Asus P4R800-V Deluxe board I used as the heart of the box is
    >standard ATX, so I used a regular size case, that's roughly the same size as
    >my Onkyo receiver, and it looks right at home in my entertainment unit.

    Great info! Many thanks

    Its exactly what I needed to know

    And that case you use does look great!

    And I also know maybe its best to get the 250 card and use a separate
    video card with TV out...... rather than al in one 350 card
  24. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    I have built one. Here's the config:
    * Mini-itx M10000. You can probably get away with M6000 for silent
    system since the CPU is hardly ever used.
    * Really compact case similar to this:
    http://www.neoseeker.com/resourcelink.html?rlid=67715
    * 256M RAM
    * 250GB maxtor 7200RPM drive
    * Hauppauge PVR-350
    * BeyondTV 3.5
    * No mouse, no keyboard, no monitor, no CDROM/DVDROM.

    The unit is so small that put it on top of a wall unit, out of sight. I
    use VNC to connect to it if I need to. I view the recordings on TV and
    wireless on any of the 4 PCs in the house. The recording quality is
    excellent and is better than Tivo. I can also edit recordings which
    Tivo does not allow you to do (this is the primary reason I wanted to
    build my own PVR).

    And best of all, it's a file/web server!


    me6@privacy.net wrote:

    > Who here has built their own Tivo or PVR unit?
    >
    > And..... has it worked out as well as say buying a
    > pre-made DVD/HDD unit such as one in link below?
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/7xj6x
  25. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    King Lear wrote:

    >
    > I can also edit recordings which
    > Tivo does not allow you to do (this is the primary reason I wanted to
    > build my own PVR).
    >

    Same here. What I do with shows I pay to watch ($55 a month for analog cable
    is absurd), is my business, not Hollywood's (I'm not going to waste my
    bandwidth "sharing" or downloading shows anyway).

    That and having control (aka : choice) over what updates get installed and
    when.
  26. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    In article <4109234B.91D75859@hotmail.com>,
    Keith Clark <clarkphotography@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    > currently I'm using two PVR-250 tuner/encoder cards.

    I tried to do that (add a second tuner card alongside my AIW 8500DV), but
    they each wanted Line In. What's your secret?

    --
    -eben ebQenW1@EtaRmpTabYayU.rIr.OcoPm home.tampabay.rr.com/hactar
    Your pretended fear lest error might step in is like the man who
    would keep all wine out of the country lest men should be drunk.
    -- Oliver Cromwell
  27. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Hactar wrote:

    > In article <4109234B.91D75859@hotmail.com>,
    > Keith Clark <clarkphotography@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > currently I'm using two PVR-250 tuner/encoder cards.
    >
    > I tried to do that (add a second tuner card alongside my AIW 8500DV), but
    > they each wanted Line In. What's your secret?
    >
    >

    Well, PVR-250 carda are a lot different than an AIW card, so I can't help
    with AIW issues, as I've never used one.

    With PVR-250, you just plug them in, and the recroding software (in my case,
    BeyondTV 3.5 beta) configures them. Both have Line-in, but I don't use those
    inputs as I record from cable. I used a distribution amplifier (cheap Radio
    Shack version) and connected each cable tuner input to it's own amp output.
    You don't *need* to use a distribution amp, but they're cheap and I wanted
    the best picture I could get, so I figured why not (it cost a lot less than
    all the cables I had to buy to hook everything up).

    The only caveat that I know of for using multiple PVR-250 cards is that both
    have to be rev 15 or 16 cards.

    If you look at the BeyondTV forum or the forums on www.shspvr.com then you'll
    find more specific info. Both places would be good places to post questions
    like yours.

    Good luck,
    Keith
  28. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    In article <410D147F.4B853465@hotmail.com>,
    Keith Clark <clarkphotography@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Hactar wrote:
    >
    > > In article <4109234B.91D75859@hotmail.com>,
    > > Keith Clark <clarkphotography@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > currently I'm using two PVR-250 tuner/encoder cards.
    > >
    > > I tried to do that (add a second tuner card alongside my AIW 8500DV), but
    > > they each wanted Line In. What's your secret?
    >
    > With PVR-250, you just plug them in, and the recroding software (in my case,
    > BeyondTV 3.5 beta)

    I was using the immediately previous public version of BTV.

    > Both have Line-in,

    On the card, with no breakout box?

    > (it cost a lot less than all the cables I had to buy to hook everything up).

    Well, all I had to buy was a two-way CATV splitter and two short CATV cables.
    And I may have had the splitter already.

    So the PVR 250's sound output goes through the PCI bus, right? ATI's AIW
    8500DV (and the EVGA Personal Cinema I got to replace it when it died) sends
    it out through the breakout box cable, to be plugged into Line In on the
    sound card.

    --
    -eben ebQenW1@EtaRmpTabYayU.rIr.OcoPm home.tampabay.rr.com/hactar
    GEMINI: Your birthday party will be ruined once again by your explosive
    flatulence. Your love life will run into trouble when your fiancee hurls a
    javelin through your chest. -- Weird Al, _Your Horoscope for Today_
  29. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    <me6@privacy.net> wrote in message
    news:gopag0trokoertbik5unl01nhnlom94ier@4ax.com...
    > Who here has built their own Tivo or PVR unit?
    >
    > And..... has it worked out as well as say buying a
    > pre-made DVD/HDD unit such as one in link below?
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/7xj6x

    I own two TiVo's and just built a PVR based on a Beyond TV / Firefly /
    PVR-250BTW bundle that I can't seem to find on their website anymore. The
    bundle cost me $187.15 delivered and arrived within a week from when I
    ordered it. You could add this to an existing computer with a big hard
    drive and be set for viewing on your monitor, but I thought I'd build from
    scratch as a fun project. I might post details later in a separate thread,
    but overall I think TiVo is better for enjoying TV.

    You can get a TiVo with lifetime subscription for under $500, and you won't
    beat that price building your own PVR. You also won't beat the user
    interface, remote control, program guide, or scheduling options. Even
    worse, you will have a Windows machine as your PVR which I doubt will be as
    reliable as my TiVo's which have never let me down, other than their program
    guide not getting updated with the latest schedule change, but that will
    bite you with your own PVR as well, probably worse.

    But you can't edit the video files from the TiVo, right? I just capture the
    programs to my hard drive, and edit away with no discernible loss in
    quality.

    If you have never used a TiVo, building a PVR may make you happy, but I
    don't EVER use mine to watch TV since it is so inferior to TiVo, so I will
    probably just sell it.
  30. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Al wrote:

    > <me6@privacy.net> wrote in message
    > news:gopag0trokoertbik5unl01nhnlom94ier@4ax.com...
    > > Who here has built their own Tivo or PVR unit?
    > >
    > > And..... has it worked out as well as say buying a
    > > pre-made DVD/HDD unit such as one in link below?
    > >
    > > http://tinyurl.com/7xj6x
    >
    > I own two TiVo's and just built a PVR based on a Beyond TV / Firefly /
    > PVR-250BTW bundle that I can't seem to find on their website anymore. The
    > bundle cost me $187.15 delivered and arrived within a week from when I
    > ordered it. You could add this to an existing computer with a big hard
    > drive and be set for viewing on your monitor, but I thought I'd build from
    > scratch as a fun project. I might post details later in a separate thread,
    > but overall I think TiVo is better for enjoying TV.
    >
    > You can get a TiVo with lifetime subscription for under $500, and you won't
    > beat that price building your own PVR. You also won't beat the user
    > interface, remote control, program guide, or scheduling options. Even
    > worse, you will have a Windows machine as your PVR which I doubt will be as
    > reliable as my TiVo's which have never let me down, other than their program
    > guide not getting updated with the latest schedule change, but that will
    > bite you with your own PVR as well, probably worse.
    >

    I strongly disagree. The BeyondTV interface should win awards in my opinion. I
    like the transparent program guide you can pop up over live TV, too. And v3.5 is
    even better in my opinion.


    >
    > But you can't edit the video files from the TiVo, right? I just capture the
    > programs to my hard drive, and edit away with no discernible loss in
    > quality.
    >
    > If you have never used a TiVo, building a PVR may make you happy, but I
    > don't EVER use mine to watch TV since it is so inferior to TiVo, so I will
    > probably just sell it.

    You must have done something wrong. Did you use the default quality or use 7000
    kbps? I find that to be at least as good as live TV.
  31. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    "Al" <No@Email.com> wrote in message
    news:410e6814$0$2838$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
    >
    > I own two TiVo's and just built a PVR based on a Beyond TV / Firefly /
    > PVR-250BTW bundle that I can't seem to find on their website anymore. The
    > bundle cost me $187.15 delivered and arrived within a week from when I
    > ordered it. You could add this to an existing computer with a big hard
    > drive and be set for viewing on your monitor, but I thought I'd build from
    > scratch as a fun project. I might post details later in a separate
    thread,
    > but overall I think TiVo is better for enjoying TV.
    >
    > You can get a TiVo with lifetime subscription for under $500, and you
    won't
    > beat that price building your own PVR. You also won't beat the user
    > interface, remote control, program guide, or scheduling options. Even
    > worse, you will have a Windows machine as your PVR which I doubt will be
    as
    > reliable as my TiVo's which have never let me down, other than their
    program
    > guide not getting updated with the latest schedule change, but that will
    > bite you with your own PVR as well, probably worse.
    >
    > But you can't edit the video files from the TiVo, right? I just capture
    the
    > programs to my hard drive, and edit away with no discernible loss in
    > quality.
    >
    > If you have never used a TiVo, building a PVR may make you happy, but I
    > don't EVER use mine to watch TV since it is so inferior to TiVo, so I will
    > probably just sell it.
    >
    I have TiVos as well, and I suspect the above poster is correct. He brings
    out that you can't edit or archive what you capture with the TiVo, while you
    can with a built-up computer based system. A good alternative is a TiVo
    and a Tabletop DVD recorder with a built in hard drive. You can capture
    with the TiVo and then transfer the video to the DVD recorder's harddrive.
    Once the video is on the hard drive you can trim off the head and tail, and
    remove portions you do not wish to archive. Then you can transfer the
    material to a DVD for later viewing. The accuracy of the editing on TiVo
    isn't great. I'm not sure if it is to the nearest "I frame" or the nearest
    second,
    but it is good enough for archiving for later viewing.

    A Tivo with a lifetime subscription and a DVD recorder together are still
    competitive with a multimedia computer, or a home built system, and likely
    much nicer to use.

    David
  32. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    "david.mccall" wrote:

    > "Al" <No@Email.com> wrote in message
    > news:410e6814$0$2838$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
    > >
    > > I own two TiVo's and just built a PVR based on a Beyond TV / Firefly /
    > > PVR-250BTW bundle that I can't seem to find on their website anymore. The
    > > bundle cost me $187.15 delivered and arrived within a week from when I
    > > ordered it. You could add this to an existing computer with a big hard
    > > drive and be set for viewing on your monitor, but I thought I'd build from
    > > scratch as a fun project. I might post details later in a separate
    > thread,
    > > but overall I think TiVo is better for enjoying TV.
    > >
    > > You can get a TiVo with lifetime subscription for under $500, and you
    > won't
    > > beat that price building your own PVR. You also won't beat the user
    > > interface, remote control, program guide, or scheduling options. Even
    > > worse, you will have a Windows machine as your PVR which I doubt will be
    > as
    > > reliable as my TiVo's which have never let me down, other than their
    > program
    > > guide not getting updated with the latest schedule change, but that will
    > > bite you with your own PVR as well, probably worse.
    > >
    > > But you can't edit the video files from the TiVo, right? I just capture
    > the
    > > programs to my hard drive, and edit away with no discernible loss in
    > > quality.
    > >
    > > If you have never used a TiVo, building a PVR may make you happy, but I
    > > don't EVER use mine to watch TV since it is so inferior to TiVo, so I will
    > > probably just sell it.
    > >
    > I have TiVos as well, and I suspect the above poster is correct. He brings
    > out that you can't edit or archive what you capture with the TiVo, while you
    > can with a built-up computer based system. A good alternative is a TiVo
    > and a Tabletop DVD recorder with a built in hard drive. You can capture
    > with the TiVo and then transfer the video to the DVD recorder's harddrive.
    > Once the video is on the hard drive you can trim off the head and tail, and
    > remove portions you do not wish to archive. Then you can transfer the
    > material to a DVD for later viewing. The accuracy of the editing on TiVo
    > isn't great. I'm not sure if it is to the nearest "I frame" or the nearest
    > second,
    > but it is good enough for archiving for later viewing.
    >
    > A Tivo with a lifetime subscription and a DVD recorder together are still
    > competitive with a multimedia computer, or a home built system, and likely
    > much nicer to use.
    >
    > David

    I've used both and I prefer BeyondTV/BeyondMedia/Firefly. Hands down.
  33. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >I have TiVos as well, and I suspect the above poster is correct. He brings
    >out that you can't edit or archive what you capture with the TiVo, while you
    >can with a built-up computer based system.

    I agree

    Good points!
  34. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    In article <410e6814$0$2838$61fed72c@news.rcn.com>, Al <No@Email.com> wrote:
    ><me6@privacy.net> wrote in message
    >You can get a TiVo with lifetime subscription for under $500, and you won't
    >beat that price building your own PVR. You also won't beat the user
    >interface, remote control, program guide, or scheduling options. Even
    >worse, you will have a Windows machine as your PVR which I doubt will be as
    >reliable as my TiVo's which have never let me down, other than their program
    >guide not getting updated with the latest schedule change, but that will
    >bite you with your own PVR as well, probably worse.

    True, but your own PC based PVR (build it on Linux instead of Windows)
    can tune OTA HDTV and record it, which Tivo won't do, unless you buy
    an HDTivo for $1000 and a subscription to DirecTV.

    Tivo has announced they will not be making a stand alone HDTivo, alas.
    --
    Spam was 25 years old in May of 2003 -- read more
    http://www.templetons.com/brad/spam/spam25.html
  35. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Brad Templeton wrote:

    >
    >
    > Tivo has announced they will not be making a stand alone HDTivo, alas.
    > --
    >

    Right, and I'm sure politics has a lot to do with it.

    If Hollywood, the NFL, et.al. get their way, nobody will be *allowed* to build
    such things.
  36. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    "Keith Clark" <clarkphotography@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:410E8282.9A62CF53@hotmail.com...
    >
    > I've used both and I prefer BeyondTV/BeyondMedia/Firefly. Hands down.
    >
    I respect your opinion, so it is likely you are correct. However, you are
    among the most PC savey folks around here and can probably put
    together a system that performs really well (I wish you were my neighbor
    :-).
    Many (perhaps most) of us aren't as skilled or patient. Tivos, and a DVD
    recorders are designed for the masses so they are easy to setup and use.
    For some people they may be an easier choice. I am encouraged to hear
    that the BeyondTV/BeyondMedia/Firefly combination is working so well
    these days. Too bad I just bought 2 more TiVos (the 80 minute was $100
    and the 40 was $50. They have made the home networking option free
    (although it failed over the weekend) so you can easily transfer shows from
    one TiVo to the next, and you can program all three online from anywhere.
    It's pretty cool.

    David
  37. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    "david.mccall" wrote:

    > "Keith Clark" <clarkphotography@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:410E8282.9A62CF53@hotmail.com...
    > >
    > > I've used both and I prefer BeyondTV/BeyondMedia/Firefly. Hands down.
    > >
    > I respect your opinion, so it is likely you are correct. However, you are
    > among the most PC savey folks around here and can probably put
    > together a system that performs really well (I wish you were my neighbor
    > :-).
    > Many (perhaps most) of us aren't as skilled or patient. Tivos, and a DVD
    > recorders are designed for the masses so they are easy to setup and use.
    > For some people they may be an easier choice. I am encouraged to hear
    > that the BeyondTV/BeyondMedia/Firefly combination is working so well
    > these days. Too bad I just bought 2 more TiVos (the 80 minute was $100
    > and the 40 was $50. They have made the home networking option free
    > (although it failed over the weekend) so you can easily transfer shows from
    > one TiVo to the next, and you can program all three online from anywhere.
    > It's pretty cool.
    >
    > David

    Wow! Thanks for the kind words, David, but here's the thing...

    Let Dell do the technical work of building the PC and then plug in a PVR-250
    card (or 2 or three), Install BeyondTV, follow the wizards, install the Firefly
    software, follow the wizards, plug your TV into the TV out jack, and you're
    done. It's very easy.

    Anyone that's motivated and can follow directions can do this today. Snapstream
    gives you lots of pre-set "qualities" that you don't need to modify to get "as
    good as live broadcast" quality. I only modified their mpeg-2 profile so I
    could import the mpeg-2 files into Ulead DVD Movie Factory without any
    re-rendering.

    I don't doubt the coolness of Tivo, and for people who have no desire to do
    things on their own, or aren't comfortable opening the cover of a PC (I've
    changed motors in cars before but I prefer not to these days ;->) I'm sure it's
    fine.

    The feature about sharing shows with other units may or may not be available at
    all times in the future depending on how successful Hollywood and others are in
    buying new laws. There was a good article over the weekend on Tivo and the
    Broadcast Flag. People need to wake up and realize what the Broadcast Flag, the
    Induce Act, etc are likely to do to the future of recording for personal use as
    we know it. Tivo's may well be viewed as "illegal" under the wording of the
    Induce Act (as will be VCRs, too) without changes, one of which would be the
    mandatory removal of *any* sharing features. According to Hollywood, even
    giving a tape of a show to your Mom who couldn't watch the show, is illegal,
    never mind removing commercials. Hollywood desperately wants to turn the clock
    back to the pre-VCR days of the 1950's.

    So that's one plus for a custom built unit. Hollywood can't force me to stop
    editing commercials or recording to DVD or converting to Divx on my PCs. Nobody
    can force me to install an update that would take away that possibility, as
    opposed to Tivo, which just crams such things down customer's throats...

    Keith
  38. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Keith Clark wrote:
    >
    > It's a lot simpler than regular tuner cards, and the quality is just stunning in
    > my opinion.
    >

    I agree. The output of my PVR-350 is visibly superior compared to
    Tivo's in full motion, and even more so in pause mode. Tivo's still
    images have pixelations while PVR-350's has absolutely none. Both are
    using the highest quality settings.

    That said, Tivo's user interface is the best, bar none. I have seen
    many Tivo wannabes on PC and none of them even come close Tivo in ease
    of use, conflict resolutions.

    /kl
  39. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    clarkphotography@hotmail.com shaped the electrons to say:
    >I strongly disagree. The BeyondTV interface should win awards in my opinion. I
    >like the transparent program guide you can pop up over live TV, too. And v3.5 is

    Just to note, that's how TiVo's guide screen works - it is
    semi-transparent and opens over the video.

    Some people actually complain about it because they'd rather have a
    solid background and not see the video behind the guide.

    -MZ, RHCE #806199299900541, ex-CISSP #3762
    --
    <URL:mailto:megazoneatmegazone.org> Gweep, Discordian, Author, Engineer, me.
    "A little nonsense now and then, is relished by the wisest men" 508-755-4098
    <URL:http://www.megazone.org/> <URL:http://www.eyrie-productions.com/> Eris
  40. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    btm@templetons.com (Brad Templeton) shaped the electrons to say:
    >Tivo has announced they will not be making a stand alone HDTivo, alas.

    Actually they haven't really said that. They've said things like 'no
    plans at this time'. While they have said they're looking at
    CableCARD units which would record digital cable, including HD. And I
    wouldn't be surprised to see such a unit sporting an ATSC tuner.

    I don't think they'll build a unit that *only* does OTA ATSC - there
    isn't enough market for it. The ATSC capability really needs to be
    part of a unit that can also record from other sources - analog input,
    digital cable, satellite, etc.

    There is no reason that a third party couldn't build one if they
    wanted. TiVo has had a reference design for a couple of years that
    does everything a standalone unit does today, plus ATSC.

    -MZ, RHCE #806199299900541, ex-CISSP #3762
    --
    <URL:mailto:megazoneatmegazone.org> Gweep, Discordian, Author, Engineer, me.
    "A little nonsense now and then, is relished by the wisest men" 508-755-4098
    <URL:http://www.megazone.org/> <URL:http://www.eyrie-productions.com/> Eris
  41. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    MegaZone wrote:

    > clarkphotography@hotmail.com shaped the electrons to say:
    > >I strongly disagree. The BeyondTV interface should win awards in my opinion. I
    > >like the transparent program guide you can pop up over live TV, too. And v3.5 is
    >
    > Just to note, that's how TiVo's guide screen works - it is
    > semi-transparent and opens over the video.
    >
    > Some people actually complain about it because they'd rather have a
    > solid background and not see the video behind the guide.
    >

    In BeyondTV you just change the rendering mode from "3D" to "Overlay" and the guide
    goes from transparent to solid.
  42. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >I strongly disagree. The BeyondTV interface should win awards in my opinion. I
    >like the transparent program guide you can pop up over live TV, too. And v3.5 is
    >even better in my opinion.

    I like the idea of building my own PVR using the 250
    card but a few questions first.

    One.... since the PC must be on all the time and in
    running mode will this consume a lot of power over say
    a Tivo or a combo DVD burner/Hard drive unit?

    Two....can the 250/350 cards be run under Linux as well
    as Windows?

    Does there exist PVR software for the 250/350 cards
    that "reliably" run under Linux?
  43. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me@privacy.net wrote:

    > >I strongly disagree. The BeyondTV interface should win awards in my opinion. I
    > >like the transparent program guide you can pop up over live TV, too. And v3.5 is
    > >even better in my opinion.
    >
    > I like the idea of building my own PVR using the 250
    > card but a few questions first.
    >
    > One.... since the PC must be on all the time and in
    > running mode will this consume a lot of power over say
    > a Tivo or a combo DVD burner/Hard drive unit?
    >

    Well, a PC with a 300W power supply probably takes a few more pennies a month to
    operate...of course you can set it to spin down the hard drives when they aren't
    being used, etc. You could in theory use a CPU with "speed step" that would use less
    power when it's not under heavy load, etc...

    The bottom line is "are the extra pennies worth the control and extra features that
    you don't get with a Tivo". For me it's a resounding "yes".


    >
    > Two....can the 250/350 cards be run under Linux as well
    > as Windows?
    >

    Yeah, a lot of people do it. Are you comfortable compiling a kernel? It's not as hard
    as it sounds. It's a pain though. Finding the code, patching the kernel, compiling,
    making sure your custom kernel didn't break something. If you're experience with
    this, then it's not a big deal. If you're new to Linux though...you're in for a real
    education.

    I wouldn't spend the extra money for a 350 though. The 250 is by far the better buy
    since the 350's TV out doesn't support overlay and isn't supported by any DVR
    software, at least that I'm aware of.

    >
    > Does there exist PVR software for the 250/350 cards
    > that "reliably" run under Linux?

    Sure. MythTV is really good. If you can get it to work.

    The thing is, getting Myth and a remote control to work on Linux is a Project.
    Getting BeyondTV to work is as hard (and takes as long) as making a cop of coffee.

    It takes hours, if not days or weeks to get a Myth box working well in my experience.
    And that's assuming you know your way around Linux. Myth isn't easy to get going.
    Some people have had good luck, but that's what it comes down to in many cases. I
    work in a software environment full of Linux-heads. We all run Linux boxes, many of
    us have dedicated Linux machines at home. about a half dozen of us got PVR-250 cards
    in the last year and some people called me a "traitor" for going the XP route for my
    DVR box. As of a couple weeks ago all of us had given up on MythTV.

    By contrast, to install XP, BeyondTV, Firefly, and get it configured the way I wanted
    took an evening after work (the worst part was the 75 Windows security patches).

    Look, I don't like Microsoft's business practices or their
    designed-in-lack-of-security. But my DVR runs XP Pro, on NTFS formatted drives, runs
    for weeks without rebooting or other issues except for installing new BeyondTV beta
    versions or the weekly Microsoft security updates. I have it behind a dedicated
    firewall box and run ZoneAlarm and NortonAV on it. I've had no issues.

    MythTV is OK for what it is if you can get it fully working, but I could never get
    the image quality in Linux that I could in Windows from the tuner card. Granted at
    that time I'd been using a WinTV-Go card and not a PVR-250 so the poor image quality
    was probably due to poor mpeg encoding in software. The other problem I had in Myth
    was that none of my recordings had audio, even though live TV was fine.

    So I gave up and went the point and click approach.
  44. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    According to Keith Clark <clarkphotography@hotmail.com>:
    : There was a good article over the weekend on Tivo and the
    :Broadcast Flag. People need to wake up and realize what the Broadcast Flag, the
    :Induce Act, etc are likely to do to the future of recording for personal use as
    :we know it. Tivo's may well be viewed as "illegal" under the wording of the
    :Induce Act (as will be VCRs, too) without changes, one of which would be the
    :mandatory removal of *any* sharing features.

    Actually, the goal seems to be to make any method of capturing and
    manipulating or sharing of video illegal - so even your custom job will
    be illegal. In fact, in articles last year, reports were that the goal
    was to put hardware in people's computers off the shelf to prevent the
    capturing/ripping and sharing of music, video, etc.


    --
    <URL: http://wiki.tcl.tk/ > In God we trust.
    Even if explicitly stated to the contrary, nothing in this posting
    should be construed as representing my employer's opinions.
    <URL: mailto:lvirden@yahoo.com > <URL: http://www.purl.org/NET/lvirden/ >
  45. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    lvirden@gmail.com wrote:

    > According to Keith Clark <clarkphotography@hotmail.com>:
    > : There was a good article over the weekend on Tivo and the
    > :Broadcast Flag. People need to wake up and realize what the Broadcast Flag, the
    > :Induce Act, etc are likely to do to the future of recording for personal use as
    > :we know it. Tivo's may well be viewed as "illegal" under the wording of the
    > :Induce Act (as will be VCRs, too) without changes, one of which would be the
    > :mandatory removal of *any* sharing features.
    >
    > Actually, the goal seems to be to make any method of capturing and
    > manipulating or sharing of video illegal - so even your custom job will
    > be illegal. In fact, in articles last year, reports were that the goal
    > was to put hardware in people's computers off the shelf to prevent the
    > capturing/ripping and sharing of music, video, etc.
    >

    Sigh...agreed. :-<

    Where did the "freedom" the US is supposed to value go?

    Anyone see the Manchurian Candidate yet?
  46. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 11:05:54 -0700, Keith Clark
    <clarkphotography@hotmail.com> wrote:

    Snip
    >I've used both and I prefer BeyondTV/BeyondMedia/Firefly. Hands down.

    Question Keith;I have been following this thread with great interest
    since I have a Tivo and think its the greatest thing since tv. But, I
    will be moving later this year and will not have the option of having
    Tivo and will have to get tv via cable or OTA.. I would not want to
    pay the $12 or so monthly fee for single chan. recording either. I
    want to build a pvr that will be able to record more than one chan. at
    the same time and ideally, would be able to have dolby and 5.1 also.
    Is it possible with the PVR-250 cards, BeyondTV and Firefly to have
    the 5.1 sound or does that require a special sound card with output to
    the home theater?
    Thanks a bunch for the good info.
    MR
  47. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    MR wrote:

    > On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 11:05:54 -0700, Keith Clark
    > <clarkphotography@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > Snip
    > >I've used both and I prefer BeyondTV/BeyondMedia/Firefly. Hands down.
    >
    > Question Keith;I have been following this thread with great interest
    > since I have a Tivo and think its the greatest thing since tv. But, I
    > will be moving later this year and will not have the option of having
    > Tivo and will have to get tv via cable or OTA.. I would not want to
    > pay the $12 or so monthly fee for single chan. recording either. I
    > want to build a pvr that will be able to record more than one chan. at
    > the same time and ideally, would be able to have dolby and 5.1 also.
    > Is it possible with the PVR-250 cards, BeyondTV and Firefly to have
    > the 5.1 sound or does that require a special sound card with output to
    > the home theater?
    > Thanks a bunch for the good info.
    > MR

    Well of course you need a sound card that supports 5.1 sound...the Asus
    P4R800-V Deluxe motherboard I used has built in 5.1 sound and an optical
    connector (as well as TV out). It's a sweet board for the money since all
    you'd need besides that would be the CPU (use a cheap Celeron since you
    won't be using a lot of CPU cycles anyway), memory, hard drive, and tuner.
    It also comes with a "special" version of Win-DVD that supports 5.1 sound
    so your DVR box can do double duty as a DVD player.

    Or you could just get a cheap Soundblaster Live Value card for under fifty
    bucks...that's what's in my desktop PC.

    Is TV encoded with 5.1 sound though?

    Most newer home theater receiver/amps (I use an Onkyo) have DSP hardware
    that do a really good job of simulating surround sound.

    When I recorded "The Quick and the Dead" on TBS, it sounded like the
    gunfights were all around us. It was as if bullets were ricocheting around
    the living rooms and the dogs (Jack Russells :->) were going nuts. When I
    watch baseball, it sounds like I'm in the middle of the game, so I can't
    complain. That said, you could get those effects with a Tivo too. It all
    depends on how good the sound in the program is to begin with...
  48. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    >The bottom line is "are the extra pennies worth the control and extra features that
    >you don't get with a Tivo". For me it's a resounding "yes".

    Thanks Keith!!

    You've been a big help n this process!!

    REALLY appreciate. I guess I will go ahead and order
    the 250 card and give it a go
  49. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    me@privacy.net wrote:

    > >The bottom line is "are the extra pennies worth the control and extra features that
    > >you don't get with a Tivo". For me it's a resounding "yes".
    >
    > Thanks Keith!!
    >
    > You've been a big help n this process!!
    >
    > REALLY appreciate. I guess I will go ahead and order
    > the 250 card and give it a go

    Be sure to bookmark the un-official PVR-250 user forum... (www.shspvr.com/forum)

    And the BeyondTV forum (forums.snapstream.com)

    And if you've got some extra bucks for a fancy case, www.pcalchemy.com has some nice
    ones.

    If you want reviews and stuff...bookmark www.htpcnews.com
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