Walk me through 16:9 on Premiere for 4:3 TV showing

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

Hi there

I like to shoot in 16:9, but so far, if I want to show the footage, I
have to show off my camera, playing it on a conventional TV (several
different ones, so buying a widescreen enhanced is not the solution
here) shows the footage anomorphically squeezed.

Now, I know there is a way to set the frame size so that it does show on
NSTC 4:3 TVs properly. How do I do that? I would have to add black bars
to the top and bottom, after all my editing is done and the frame size
adjustment is the last step right?

I am using Premiere 6.5. What I have tried is setting the aspect ratio
of the clip AND the pixel aspect ratio AND tried the settings aspect
ratio of both 4:3 and 16:9.

Nada, the video looks the same in each, even when I put black bars in
there. IS there something that I am not doing right?

I would like to even edit the 16:9 and put it back onto the miniDV tape,
but in the "4:3" black barred version so I can show people.

Can anyone help?
16 answers Last reply
More about walk premiere showing
  1. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    While you're waiting for a Premiere specific answer, here's something that
    may help:

    When you specify an aspect ratio in an editing program, you are doing one of
    two things:

    1. Setting a file tag. This doesn't change anything about the actual video.
    It's simply a cue to the eventual user or device as to the type of material
    it is.

    2. Letterboxing. This is actually a transformation of the frame that reduces
    the number of vertical scan lines to about 384, filling in above and below
    that with black. The horizontal dimension of the video is preserved. This is
    what enables a 4:3 TV to display widescren material.

    (2) is what you want. On the program I use, which is not Premiere,
    letterboxing is an effect, and is found with the other effects.

    You might think that an editing program would have a simple command to
    output letterbox16:9, but this is not necessarily so. In the case of Avid
    Express, this must be applied as an effect.

    "eb7g" <eb7g@shaw.caNOSPAM> wrote in message
    news:dbWNc.126604$Mr4.62369@pd7tw1no...
    > Hi there
    >
    > I like to shoot in 16:9, but so far, if I want to show the footage, I
    > have to show off my camera, playing it on a conventional TV (several
    > different ones, so buying a widescreen enhanced is not the solution
    > here) shows the footage anomorphically squeezed.
    >
    > Now, I know there is a way to set the frame size so that it does show on
    > NSTC 4:3 TVs properly. How do I do that? I would have to add black bars
    > to the top and bottom, after all my editing is done and the frame size
    > adjustment is the last step right?
    >
    > I am using Premiere 6.5. What I have tried is setting the aspect ratio
    > of the clip AND the pixel aspect ratio AND tried the settings aspect
    > ratio of both 4:3 and 16:9.
    >
    > Nada, the video looks the same in each, even when I put black bars in
    > there. IS there something that I am not doing right?
    >
    > I would like to even edit the 16:9 and put it back onto the miniDV tape,
    > but in the "4:3" black barred version so I can show people.
    >
    > Can anyone help?
    >
  2. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    In Premiere, this can be done with a simple mask on an overlay track. Using
    alpha channel. Or even a 'title' will do the trick. Of course it does have
    to be rendered.
    "eb7g" <eb7g@shaw.caNOSPAM> wrote in message
    news:dbWNc.126604$Mr4.62369@pd7tw1no...
    > Hi there
    >
    > I like to shoot in 16:9, but so far, if I want to show the footage, I
    > have to show off my camera, playing it on a conventional TV (several
    > different ones, so buying a widescreen enhanced is not the solution
    > here) shows the footage anomorphically squeezed.
    >
    > Now, I know there is a way to set the frame size so that it does show on
    > NSTC 4:3 TVs properly. How do I do that? I would have to add black bars
    > to the top and bottom, after all my editing is done and the frame size
    > adjustment is the last step right?
    >
    > I am using Premiere 6.5. What I have tried is setting the aspect ratio
    > of the clip AND the pixel aspect ratio AND tried the settings aspect
    > ratio of both 4:3 and 16:9.
    >
    > Nada, the video looks the same in each, even when I put black bars in
    > there. IS there something that I am not doing right?
    >
    > I would like to even edit the 16:9 and put it back onto the miniDV tape,
    > but in the "4:3" black barred version so I can show people.
    >
    > Can anyone help?
    >
  3. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    On 29-Jul-2004, "nappy" <no_spam_@sorry.com> wrote:

    > In Premiere, this can be done with a simple mask on an overlay track.
    > Using
    > alpha channel. Or even a 'title' will do the trick. Of course it does have
    > to be rendered.
    > "eb7g" <eb7g@shaw.caNOSPAM> wrote in message
    > news:dbWNc.126604$Mr4.62369@pd7tw1no...
    > > Hi there
    > >
    > > I like to shoot in 16:9, but so far, if I want to show the footage, I
    > > have to show off my camera, playing it on a conventional TV (several
    > > different ones, so buying a widescreen enhanced is not the solution
    > > here) shows the footage anomorphically squeezed.

    I think you're missing the point of his question. The 16:9 footage is
    stretched vertically in his 4:3 frame. Masking it off won't help.

    Here's what you need to do...

    Keep everything is a 16:9 project until your production is complete. Render
    it to a single 16:9 DV AVI file. You can then archive this back to tape for
    a backup and keep a full resolution copy.

    Next, open a new 4:3 project. Import the 16:9 file as a single "clip". Apply
    the effect "Transform" to the clip and set the height to 75% and render
    (this will take a while).

    You now should have a 4:3 movie with your 16:9 footage "letterboxed". Export
    to tape and you can show it on any 4:3 TV and it will display correctly with
    the right aspect ratio and black bars on the top and bottom.

    --
    Chris

    Munged email. To reply by email (each "word" a letter):
    see jay bee are oh oh kay ee [AT] em ess en [DOT] see oh em
  4. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    "FlyByKnight" <FlyByKnight@example.invalid> wrote in message
    news:PgbOc.18564$I82.12899@fe52.usenetserver.com...
    >
    > On 29-Jul-2004, "nappy" <no_spam_@sorry.com> wrote:
    >
    > > In Premiere, this can be done with a simple mask on an overlay track.
    > > Using
    > > alpha channel. Or even a 'title' will do the trick. Of course it does
    have
    > > to be rendered.
    > > "eb7g" <eb7g@shaw.caNOSPAM> wrote in message
    > > news:dbWNc.126604$Mr4.62369@pd7tw1no...
    > > > Hi there
    > > >
    > > > I like to shoot in 16:9, but so far, if I want to show the footage, I
    > > > have to show off my camera, playing it on a conventional TV (several
    > > > different ones, so buying a widescreen enhanced is not the solution
    > > > here) shows the footage anomorphically squeezed.
    >
    > I think you're missing the point of his question. The 16:9 footage is
    > stretched vertically in his 4:3 frame. Masking it off won't help.


    true.. so true.. ashamed am i.. can;t he use 'maintain aspect' and size it?


    >
    > Here's what you need to do...
    >
    > Keep everything is a 16:9 project until your production is complete.
    Render
    > it to a single 16:9 DV AVI file. You can then archive this back to tape
    for
    > a backup and keep a full resolution copy.
    >
    > Next, open a new 4:3 project. Import the 16:9 file as a single "clip".
    Apply
    > the effect "Transform" to the clip and set the height to 75% and render
    > (this will take a while).
    >
    > You now should have a 4:3 movie with your 16:9 footage "letterboxed".
    Export
    > to tape and you can show it on any 4:3 TV and it will display correctly
    with
    > the right aspect ratio and black bars on the top and bottom.
    >
    > --
    > Chris
    >
    > Munged email. To reply by email (each "word" a letter):
    > see jay bee are oh oh kay ee [AT] em ess en [DOT] see oh em
    >
  5. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    On 29-Jul-2004, "nappy" <no_spam_@sorry.com> wrote:

    > > I think you're missing the point of his question. The 16:9 footage is
    > > stretched vertically in his 4:3 frame. Masking it off won't help.
    >
    >
    > true.. so true.. ashamed am i.. can;t he use 'maintain aspect' and size
    > it?

    In Premiere 6.0, the "Maintain Aspect Ratio" setting didn't work properly
    after the clip was rendered. They may have fixed this in 6.5 (or Pro 1.5)
    but maybe not. Using the tranform effect removes all doubt and ensures
    correct AR in the final render. Better safe than sorry, I always say.

    --
    Chris

    Munged email. To reply by email (each "word" a letter):
    see jay bee are oh oh kay ee [AT] em ess en [DOT] see oh em
  6. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    interesting.. I never had a problem with it.

    P
    "FlyByKnight" <FlyByKnight@example.invalid> wrote in message
    news:WbvOc.32619$cX4.21965@fe04.usenetserver.com...
    >
    > On 29-Jul-2004, "nappy" <no_spam_@sorry.com> wrote:
    >
    > > > I think you're missing the point of his question. The 16:9 footage is
    > > > stretched vertically in his 4:3 frame. Masking it off won't help.
    > >
    > >
    > > true.. so true.. ashamed am i.. can;t he use 'maintain aspect' and size
    > > it?
    >
    > In Premiere 6.0, the "Maintain Aspect Ratio" setting didn't work properly
    > after the clip was rendered. They may have fixed this in 6.5 (or Pro 1.5)
    > but maybe not. Using the tranform effect removes all doubt and ensures
    > correct AR in the final render. Better safe than sorry, I always say.
    >
    > --
    > Chris
    >
    > Munged email. To reply by email (each "word" a letter):
    > see jay bee are oh oh kay ee [AT] em ess en [DOT] see oh em
    >
  7. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    "nappy" <no_spam_@sorry.com> wrote in message news:<bAvOc.101907$Li4.11505@newssvr29.news.prodigy.com>...

    >
    > interesting.. I never had a problem with it.
    >

    " Maintain Aspect Ratio" would have no effect, as so-called widescreen
    footage has a 4x3 aspect, it just happens to be anamorphically
    stretched within the image so that it can be viewed correctly on a
    widescreen TV, which induces a horizontal stretch by changing the
    shape of the pixels, thus correcting the proportions.

    M.A.R. would have worked with graphics that have a truly different
    aspect ratio in actual dimension, rather than being intended to be
    watched with distorted pixels.

    Dylan
  8. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    This worked FlyByKnight. Thanks!!!


    FlyByKnight wrote:

    > On 29-Jul-2004, "nappy" <no_spam_@sorry.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In Premiere, this can be done with a simple mask on an overlay track.
    >>Using
    >>alpha channel. Or even a 'title' will do the trick. Of course it does have
    >>to be rendered.
    >>"eb7g" <eb7g@shaw.caNOSPAM> wrote in message
    >>news:dbWNc.126604$Mr4.62369@pd7tw1no...
    >>
    >>>Hi there
    >>>
    >>>I like to shoot in 16:9, but so far, if I want to show the footage, I
    >>>have to show off my camera, playing it on a conventional TV (several
    >>>different ones, so buying a widescreen enhanced is not the solution
    >>>here) shows the footage anomorphically squeezed.
    >
    >
    > I think you're missing the point of his question. The 16:9 footage is
    > stretched vertically in his 4:3 frame. Masking it off won't help.
    >
    > Here's what you need to do...
    >
    > Keep everything is a 16:9 project until your production is complete. Render
    > it to a single 16:9 DV AVI file. You can then archive this back to tape for
    > a backup and keep a full resolution copy.
    >
    > Next, open a new 4:3 project. Import the 16:9 file as a single "clip". Apply
    > the effect "Transform" to the clip and set the height to 75% and render
    > (this will take a while).
    >
    > You now should have a 4:3 movie with your 16:9 footage "letterboxed". Export
    > to tape and you can show it on any 4:3 TV and it will display correctly with
    > the right aspect ratio and black bars on the top and bottom.
    >
  9. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    Does anyone else have this problem?

    I am supposed to be able to export edited videos from my Sony Viao
    laptap into my Sony PDX10. This can be done through Premiere 6.5 or
    through Sony DV GateMotion (this came with the computer).

    Well I edit the clip in Premiere and when I am done, regardless of
    whether it's 4:3 or 16:9, it will not import into DV GateMotion. Perhaps
    there is some special setting/treatment I can do in Premiere to get DV
    Gate to accept the Premiere rendered file? Anyone know?

    Anyhow, I am able to get clips to sorta "print to tape" or "export to
    video" or even play off the timeline and record on the camera. HOWEVER,
    the image will break up, VERY badly, like totally blank out, sound cuts
    in and out, a lot of bad stuff. Basically it will start for about 10
    secs then the rest will be screwed up.

    Does anyone have experience with this and have any solutions? Perhaps
    Sony Vegas will export properly?

    Thanks
  10. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    You should be able to export directly to the camera from Premiere. That is
    done every day by a lot of people.


    "eb7g" <eb7g@shaw.caNOSPAM> wrote in message
    news:GhxPc.155922$Mr4.140684@pd7tw1no...
    > Does anyone else have this problem?
    >
    > I am supposed to be able to export edited videos from my Sony Viao
    > laptap into my Sony PDX10. This can be done through Premiere 6.5 or
    > through Sony DV GateMotion (this came with the computer).
    >
    > Well I edit the clip in Premiere and when I am done, regardless of
    > whether it's 4:3 or 16:9, it will not import into DV GateMotion. Perhaps
    > there is some special setting/treatment I can do in Premiere to get DV
    > Gate to accept the Premiere rendered file? Anyone know?
    >
    > Anyhow, I am able to get clips to sorta "print to tape" or "export to
    > video" or even play off the timeline and record on the camera. HOWEVER,
    > the image will break up, VERY badly, like totally blank out, sound cuts
    > in and out, a lot of bad stuff. Basically it will start for about 10
    > secs then the rest will be screwed up.
    >
    > Does anyone have experience with this and have any solutions? Perhaps
    > Sony Vegas will export properly?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
  11. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 20:15:34 GMT, eb7g <eb7g@shaw.caNOSPAM> wrote:

    >Does anyone else have this problem?
    >
    >I am supposed to be able to export edited videos from my Sony Viao
    >laptap into my Sony PDX10. This can be done through Premiere 6.5 or
    >through Sony DV GateMotion (this came with the computer).
    >
    >Well I edit the clip in Premiere and when I am done, regardless of
    >whether it's 4:3 or 16:9, it will not import into DV GateMotion. Perhaps
    >there is some special setting/treatment I can do in Premiere to get DV
    >Gate to accept the Premiere rendered file? Anyone know?
    >
    >Anyhow, I am able to get clips to sorta "print to tape" or "export to
    >video" or even play off the timeline and record on the camera. HOWEVER,
    >the image will break up, VERY badly, like totally blank out, sound cuts
    >in and out, a lot of bad stuff. Basically it will start for about 10
    >secs then the rest will be screwed up.
    >
    >Does anyone have experience with this and have any solutions? Perhaps
    >Sony Vegas will export properly?

    I've also experienced that DVgate only works with files captured with
    DVgate. Maybe it is a dv type (1 or 2) thing. The best thing you can
    do is to capture with Premiere, edit with Premiere and export with
    Premiere, that should work. Vegas is certainly worth a try.

    I set my hope on DV to be a good standard which would be
    interchangeable between lots of programs, it appeared to be not
    trouble free however.
  12. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production (More info?)

    I think you will find that in order for you to export edited video
    from your VAIO using DVGate, it is necessary for you to render it in
    Premiere using the Sony DV codec ONLY, using the correct settings for
    DVGate, such as audio, interleaving rate of each frame, rather than
    each second, etc.

    The best way to assure that you are using the correct settings is to
    "capture" (import) a video clip using DVGAte(Motion, and then
    determine what settings DVGate used to import the clip. When
    rendering a clip for eventual export, you must use exactly the same
    settings as the test clip, and most importantly, use ONLY the Sony DV
    codec for rendering.

    Premiere is most likely not set up to use the Sony DV codec, so any
    video rendered by any other codec in Premiere automatically becomes
    incompatible with DVGate.

    Commencing with Premiere 5.1 (as I recall), Sony provided a "Sony DV
    codec plug-in" for Premiere. If you use the plug-in AND religiously
    adhere to the Sony parameters, you should be fine.

    One other caution: My experience has all been with older VAIOs and
    versions of DVGate. Those versions of hardware and software used
    Video for windows, and were limited to 2 GB maximum file size (about 9
    and 1/2 minute video files).

    If you are using newer versions of VAIOs and DVGAte, then feel free to
    ignore all the above.

    "someone" <mike@xyz.com> wrote in message news:<cemd2803vl@enews1.newsguy.com>...
    > You should be able to export directly to the camera from Premiere. That is
    > done every day by a lot of people.
    >
    >
    >
    > "eb7g" <eb7g@shaw.caNOSPAM> wrote in message
    > news:GhxPc.155922$Mr4.140684@pd7tw1no...
    > > Does anyone else have this problem?
    > >
    > > I am supposed to be able to export edited videos from my Sony Viao
    > > laptap into my Sony PDX10. This can be done through Premiere 6.5 or
    > > through Sony DV GateMotion (this came with the computer).
    > >
    > > Well I edit the clip in Premiere and when I am done, regardless of
    > > whether it's 4:3 or 16:9, it will not import into DV GateMotion. Perhaps
    > > there is some special setting/treatment I can do in Premiere to get DV
    > > Gate to accept the Premiere rendered file? Anyone know?
    > >
    > > Anyhow, I am able to get clips to sorta "print to tape" or "export to
    > > video" or even play off the timeline and record on the camera. HOWEVER,
    > > the image will break up, VERY badly, like totally blank out, sound cuts
    > > in and out, a lot of bad stuff. Basically it will start for about 10
    > > secs then the rest will be screwed up.
    > >
    > > Does anyone have experience with this and have any solutions? Perhaps
    > > Sony Vegas will export properly?
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
  13. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On 3 Aug 2004 08:44:57 -0700, sandyprice@msn.com (mikep76) wrote:

    >I think you will find that in order for you to export edited video
    >from your VAIO using DVGate, it is necessary for you to render it in
    >Premiere using the Sony DV codec ONLY, using the correct settings for
    >DVGate, such as audio, interleaving rate of each frame, rather than
    >each second, etc.
    >
    >The best way to assure that you are using the correct settings is to
    >"capture" (import) a video clip using DVGAte(Motion, and then
    >determine what settings DVGate used to import the clip. When
    >rendering a clip for eventual export, you must use exactly the same
    >settings as the test clip, and most importantly, use ONLY the Sony DV
    >codec for rendering.
    >
    >Premiere is most likely not set up to use the Sony DV codec, so any
    >video rendered by any other codec in Premiere automatically becomes
    >incompatible with DVGate.
    >
    >Commencing with Premiere 5.1 (as I recall), Sony provided a "Sony DV
    >codec plug-in" for Premiere. If you use the plug-in AND religiously
    >adhere to the Sony parameters, you should be fine.
    >
    >One other caution: My experience has all been with older VAIOs and
    >versions of DVGate. Those versions of hardware and software used
    >Video for windows, and were limited to 2 GB maximum file size (about 9
    >and 1/2 minute video files).
    >
    >If you are using newer versions of VAIOs and DVGAte, then feel free to
    >ignore all the above.

    Interesting story. Did you ever succeed with the described procedure
    in opening a file from Adobe's Premiere with DVgate? Thank you.
  14. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    YUP. I still own a VAIO 522DS, a VAIO 314DS(?), a VAIO F-180 laptop
    (which SONY said could not do video, but with a bootleg copy of
    DVGate, I was capturing editing and outputting back to tape within 5
    minutes of installing DVGate, and a PictureBook C1PVK (Win2k OS).

    I eventually was able to load a later version of DVGate from a VAIO
    XG29 onto any of my others, and update them to include the DVGate
    plug-in for Premiere 5.1, which included the ability to output MPEG-2
    video as well as MPEG-1 and DV.

    If you search this forum for my name, back several years (starting in
    late 1999 or early 2000) you will find that I gave this same advice to
    many VAIO users who could not get them to import, edit and output back
    to tape. Their problem almost always stemmed from using the wrong
    settings for DVGate, or attempting to render directly in Premiere (4.2
    or 5.1) without using the Sony DV Codec option in Premiere (with the
    DVGate parameters.)

    Funprice <jhbusscherNOSPAM@freemail.nl> wrote in message news:<kaevg0h5vmkt7ttp54cnur4g74gss5sl44@4ax.com>...
    > On 3 Aug 2004 08:44:57 -0700, sandyprice@msn.com (mikep76) wrote:
    >
    > >I think you will find that in order for you to export edited video
    > >from your VAIO using DVGate, it is necessary for you to render it in
    > >Premiere using the Sony DV codec ONLY, using the correct settings for
    > >DVGate, such as audio, interleaving rate of each frame, rather than
    > >each second, etc.
    > >
    > >The best way to assure that you are using the correct settings is to
    > >"capture" (import) a video clip using DVGAte(Motion, and then
    > >determine what settings DVGate used to import the clip. When
    > >rendering a clip for eventual export, you must use exactly the same
    > >settings as the test clip, and most importantly, use ONLY the Sony DV
    > >codec for rendering.
    > >
    > >Premiere is most likely not set up to use the Sony DV codec, so any
    > >video rendered by any other codec in Premiere automatically becomes
    > >incompatible with DVGate.
    > >
    > >Commencing with Premiere 5.1 (as I recall), Sony provided a "Sony DV
    > >codec plug-in" for Premiere. If you use the plug-in AND religiously
    > >adhere to the Sony parameters, you should be fine.
    > >
    > >One other caution: My experience has all been with older VAIOs and
    > >versions of DVGate. Those versions of hardware and software used
    > >Video for windows, and were limited to 2 GB maximum file size (about 9
    > >and 1/2 minute video files).
    > >
    > >If you are using newer versions of VAIOs and DVGAte, then feel free to
    > >ignore all the above.
    >
    > Interesting story. Did you ever succeed with the described procedure
    > in opening a file from Adobe's Premiere with DVgate? Thank you.
  15. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On 3 Aug 2004 19:51:36 -0700, sandyprice@msn.com (mikep76) wrote:

    >YUP. I still own a VAIO 522DS, a VAIO 314DS(?), a VAIO F-180 laptop
    >(which SONY said could not do video, but with a bootleg copy of
    >DVGate, I was capturing editing and outputting back to tape within 5
    >minutes of installing DVGate, and a PictureBook C1PVK (Win2k OS).
    >
    >I eventually was able to load a later version of DVGate from a VAIO
    >XG29 onto any of my others, and update them to include the DVGate
    >plug-in for Premiere 5.1, which included the ability to output MPEG-2
    >video as well as MPEG-1 and DV.
    >
    >If you search this forum for my name, back several years (starting in
    >late 1999 or early 2000) you will find that I gave this same advice to
    >many VAIO users who could not get them to import, edit and output back
    >to tape. Their problem almost always stemmed from using the wrong
    >settings for DVGate, or attempting to render directly in Premiere (4.2
    >or 5.1) without using the Sony DV Codec option in Premiere (with the
    >DVGate parameters.)

    To bother you again and to take away more of my disbelieve: can you be
    more specific on what those DVgate parameters are and should be set
    to? Thanks again.
  16. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Funprice:

    I went to VEgas a coule of years ago, and no longer even have Premiere
    on any of my machines. I started using Premiere 4.2 on an old Gateway
    Pentium Pro using a FAST AV Master campture card. When I got my VAIO
    522DS I moved Premiere 4.2 onto that machine. After a lot of reading,
    web-crawling and trial and error attempts, I finally learned that I
    had to render in 2 GB or smaller file size, use the Sony DV Codec
    option in Premiere (4.2 or 5.1), select 720 x 480 frame size (Premiere
    4.2 would naturally choose 640 x 480 frame size if I didn't change the
    preference list), interlace set at single frame, rather than each
    second, use only the "SONY" correct audio sample rate, (which was
    either 44.1 KHZ or 48 KHZ - I don't remember which), and there may
    have been more settings, but I no longer concern myself with them, so
    I don't recall what they might have been.

    Since you have never said which version of Premiere and VAIO you are
    using, only implying that you question my veracity, I can be of no
    further assistance that this. As I said in my first reply, if you are
    using more recent hardware or software versions, none of this may be
    pertinent.

    The only other suggestion I can offer is the following URL for the
    unofficial Sony website:

    http://p200.ezboard.com/bunofficialsony

    where you can search their archives, which are full of frustrated VAIO
    users trying to help each other figure out how to use their Sony
    equipment and software.

    Funprice <jhbusscherNOSPAM@freemail.nl> wrote in message news:<fs91h05frslmah8ukvbjs2j0e60sepreej@4ax.com>...

    > To bother you again and to take away more of my disbelieve: can you be
    > more specific on what those DVgate parameters are and should be set
    > to? Thanks again.
Ask a new question

Read More

Tuner Cards TV Video Graphics