16:9 widescreen help

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hi, I have a Panasonic PV-GS200 and I would like to shoot in widescreen
format. Instead of having the black bars of "cinema" mode, I have been
using a 0.7x (or 0.8x) converter (ala Kodak for $70) and a step-up ring and
then shooting with the "slim" effect which basically squeezes the picture.
Actually, with the converter on, I have better scene coverage than without
the converter and no effect. This seems like a practical way of getting
around spending $350 for a Century Optics 16:9 converter.
I have been using Adobe Premiere 6.0 which came with my computer and I've
been burning DVDs from the avi files with Easy DVD Creator 6. When I start
a new project with Premiere, I've made the settings so that the project will
be a 16:9 NTSC DV format. In the project window, the proportions are
correct, i.e. 16:9, but when I "Export to Video", the aspect ratio changes
so that the image is still a little squeezed slim (not 4:3, but the
proportions do not look the same). Furthermore, when I import to Easy DVD
Creator, I lose the aspect ratio completely and it reverts to 4:3 when I
"preview" it. Also when I play the avi file with Windows Media Player 9,
the aspect ratio does not reflect 16:9 but rather 4:3.
How do I get the Premiere output file to reflect 16:9 and how do I get the
DVD to be 16:9?
Should I upgrade to Premiere Pro and Encore?

I am trying to shoot a documentary and I hope to get it transferred to 35mm.

Thanks for you help,

Rocket
1 answer Last reply
More about widescreen help
  1. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    "Rocket" <noone@noneofyourbusiness.com> wrote in message news:<10h0vl1rq39u7ae@corp.supernews.com>...
    > Hi, I have a Panasonic PV-GS200 and I would like to shoot in widescreen
    > format. Instead of having the black bars of "cinema" mode, I have been
    > using a 0.7x (or 0.8x) converter (ala Kodak for $70) and a step-up ring and
    > then shooting with the "slim" effect which basically squeezes the picture.
    > Actually, with the converter on, I have better scene coverage than without
    > the converter and no effect. This seems like a practical way of getting
    > around spending $350 for a Century Optics 16:9 converter.
    > I have been using Adobe Premiere 6.0 which came with my computer and I've
    > been burning DVDs from the avi files with Easy DVD Creator 6. When I start
    > a new project with Premiere, I've made the settings so that the project will
    > be a 16:9 NTSC DV format. In the project window, the proportions are
    > correct, i.e. 16:9, but when I "Export to Video", the aspect ratio changes
    > so that the image is still a little squeezed slim (not 4:3, but the
    > proportions do not look the same). Furthermore, when I import to Easy DVD
    > Creator, I lose the aspect ratio completely and it reverts to 4:3 when I
    > "preview" it. Also when I play the avi file with Windows Media Player 9,
    > the aspect ratio does not reflect 16:9 but rather 4:3.
    > How do I get the Premiere output file to reflect 16:9 and how do I get the
    > DVD to be 16:9?
    > Should I upgrade to Premiere Pro and Encore?
    >
    > I am trying to shoot a documentary and I hope to get it transferred to 35mm.
    >
    > Thanks for you help,
    >
    > Rocket

    Rocket,

    No problem. The DV AVI will appear in 4:3 since you are distorting the
    image to fit the entire CCD. I use a Sony TRV33 which has this 16:9
    capability on board and that is how the DV file appears on my computer
    as well. The key is in your MPEG encoder settings when you prepare the
    MPEG2 file for authoring to DVD. I am not familiar with Easy DVD
    Creator but in Cinema Craft Encoder you just need to be sure you
    select 16:9 aspect when encoding the video. Then you MPEG2 file will
    be the correct aspect for authoring to a 16:9 DVD. I have shot many
    videos this way now and it looks great on my widescreen TV. I suggest
    that you try working with other programs if Easy DVD Creator doesn't
    give you this option. The latest version of Ulead DVD Workshop seems
    to provide good quality and is full featured so you may have more
    flexibility in choosing video encoding options.
Ask a new question

Read More

Tuner Cards Converter Graphics