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different ip addresses at different locations

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Anonymous
April 1, 2004 7:11:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

I have two locations (main office and a remote site) Both locations have static IP addressing schemes that are different. I need to have the user login in to either site with the the correct ip address, subnetmask, gateway and dns servers.

I tried hardware profiles but that does work. Each time I change the IP address it changes it for all profiles. There is only one ethernet card as it is a laptop.
Neither locations have a DHCP in existence.

Help I can't find anything on this.

Thanks
Cathryn

More about : addresses locations

Anonymous
April 1, 2004 11:20:10 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

You can't do this in XP without a 3rd party product like Netswitcher. See
http://www.netswitcher.com/

--

Thanks,
Marc Reynolds
Microsoft Technical Support

This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.


"Cathryn" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:458599A8-3C6D-462F-8030-38081643B79A@microsoft.com...
> I have two locations (main office and a remote site) Both locations have
static IP addressing schemes that are different. I need to have the user
login in to either site with the the correct ip address, subnetmask, gateway
and dns servers.
>
> I tried hardware profiles but that does work. Each time I change the IP
address it changes it for all profiles. There is only one ethernet card as
it is a laptop.
> Neither locations have a DHCP in existence.
>
> Help I can't find anything on this.
>
> Thanks
> Cathryn
>
Anonymous
April 2, 2004 12:24:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Just curious - why are you not using DHCP??

Cathryn wrote:
> I have two locations (main office and a remote site) Both locations
> have static IP addressing schemes that are different. I need to have
> the user login in to either site with the the correct ip address,
> subnetmask, gateway and dns servers.
>
> I tried hardware profiles but that does work. Each time I change the
> IP address it changes it for all profiles. There is only one
> ethernet card as it is a laptop. Neither locations have a DHCP in
> existence.
>
> Help I can't find anything on this.
>
> Thanks
> Cathryn
Related resources
Anonymous
April 2, 2004 10:22:51 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Cathryn wrote:
> I have two locations (main office and a remote site) Both locations
> have static IP addressing schemes that are different. I need to have
> the user login in to either site with the the correct ip address,
> subnetmask, gateway and dns servers.
>
> I tried hardware profiles but that does work. Each time I change the
> IP address it changes it for all profiles. There is only one
> ethernet card as it is a laptop.
>
> Neither locations have a DHCP in existence.
>
> Help I can't find anything on this.

Lanwench [MVP - Exchange] wrote:
> Just curious - why are you not using DHCP??

Depending on how you mean that question, Lanwench; either they already gave
you that answer or they don't have control over the network at either
location.

Marc gave you one solution - third party products.

Another solution would require some user knowledge/experience, but not much.
Even assuming they must log into a domain, the machine will cache the logon
and then, given the user have the correct rights, they could use a batch
script you write for them to change the IP appropriately.

We do this in several locations. Using a NETSH dump for each site and
applying those dumps using the scripts. We have as many scripts on the
laptop as the user has locations without DHCP and they run the appropriate
script.

Do a GOOGLE search for NETSH for more information, but essentially:

To Save the current Settings, type the following command:

netsh -c interface dump >settingssiteone.txt

You can then create a dump file for every network that you use.

To load a set of settings again, type the following command:

netsh -f settingssiteone.txt

--
<- Shenan ->
--
Anonymous
April 2, 2004 1:02:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Shenan Stanley wrote:
<snip>

>Lanwench [MVP - Exchange] wrote:
>> Just curious - why are you not using DHCP??
>
> Depending on how you mean that question, Lanwench; either they
> already gave you that answer or they don't have control over the
> network at either location.

No, they didn't give me an answer, and since the OP phrased it as "I have
two locations" and was talking about a user, it made me wonder whether this
might indeed be under his/her control...I haven't used static addressing
(besides printers/servers/network equipment) for ages! It was an innocent
question. :-)

<snip>
Anonymous
April 2, 2004 5:33:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

"Shenan Stanley" <news_helper@hushmail.com> wrote in message
news:o G3X30KGEHA.2408@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>
> Another solution would require some user knowledge/experience, but not
> much.
> Even assuming they must log into a domain, the machine will cache the
> logon
> and then, given the user have the correct rights, they could use a batch
> script you write for them to change the IP appropriately.
>
> We do this in several locations. Using a NETSH dump for each site and
> applying those dumps using the scripts. We have as many scripts on the
> laptop as the user has locations without DHCP and they run the appropriate
> script.
>
> Do a GOOGLE search for NETSH for more information, but essentially:
>
> To Save the current Settings, type the following command:
>
> netsh -c interface dump >settingssiteone.txt
>
> You can then create a dump file for every network that you use.
>
> To load a set of settings again, type the following command:
>
> netsh -f settingssiteone.txt

Netsh gets even more powerful with SP2--it will be able to configure both
the IPV4 and IPV6 firewalls.

This is a very useful mechanism, and I suspect we'll see more third-party
stuff using it under the hood.
!