VPN Connects OK; Cannot map drives

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

When I use VPN to connect to my corporate network, it connects OK. Internet
Explorer can access the corporate intranet. But I cannot map any network
drives.

I am using Windows XP Home Edition. On my old Windows 98 PC, I have no
problem mapping the network drives.

Perhaps I don't have my WinXP network connections configured correctly. Can
anyone advise me?
7 answers Last reply
More about connects drives
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

    your error something like this:

    ""Windows cannot find '//(server ip)' . Make sure you typed the name
    correctly, and then try again. To search for a file, click the Start
    button, and then click Search."
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

    What erros do you get? Try mapping a drive using alternate credentials (for
    the domain) - use Explorer (tools menu) or a command line for that.

    net use x: \\server\share /user:domainname\username <enter>


    Don wrote:
    > When I use VPN to connect to my corporate network, it connects OK.
    > Internet Explorer can access the corporate intranet. But I cannot
    > map any network drives.
    >
    > I am using Windows XP Home Edition. On my old Windows 98 PC, I have
    > no problem mapping the network drives.
    >
    > Perhaps I don't have my WinXP network connections configured
    > correctly. Can anyone advise me?
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

    On Thu, 8 Apr 2004 19:36:45 -0400, "Don" <engguy58NOSPAM@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >When I use VPN to connect to my corporate network, it connects OK. Internet
    >Explorer can access the corporate intranet. But I cannot map any network
    >drives.
    >
    >I am using Windows XP Home Edition. On my old Windows 98 PC, I have no
    >problem mapping the network drives.
    >
    >Perhaps I don't have my WinXP network connections configured correctly. Can
    >anyone advise me?

    Unless you have an XP VPN Client, NetBIOS is unavailable for name
    resolution. MS deliberately crippled Win2K to make people buy XP. XP
    has it - look under WINS for TCP/IP in the VPN Client, then enable it.

    If you do not have NetBIOS in the VPN Client, then use the raw IP
    address of the VPN machine, e.g.

    \\192.168.1.X

    in Start|Run to display the shares on the remote machine. This is
    bi-directional - you can do it from the VPN Client or the VPN Server.

    For the VPN Server, the raw IP is the first in the range you allocated
    for IP addresses on the VPN. For the VPN Client, use a static address
    (you will have to permit the use of a static VPN Client address in
    the VPN Server).

    For example, I set up a Win2K PPTP VPN with address range
    192.168.1.100 - 200. I disabled DHCP in the router for that range,
    thus assuring that no one else would grab one of my reserved
    addresses. This is not really necessary since MS peer-to-peer only
    supports 10 users.

    I also enabled a static address for the VPN Client, namely
    192.168.1.150. The VPN Server grabs the first address in the allowed
    range, namely 192.168.1.100.

    So now I have the raw IP addresses of the two machines on the VPN.
    Using Start|Run I create a window displaying the shares for a given
    remote machine. I then make a shortcut for that window.


    --

    Map Of The Vast Right Wing Conspiracy:
    http://www.freewebs.com/vrwc/

    You know you are in Hell when you have to make a
    distinction between what is moral and what is legal.
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

    Thanks for the responses.

    I did try to map the drive using the raw IP address.

    The error I get is:

    The network path: \\111.222.333.444\SubdirectoryName could not be found.

    I can't understand why this network path works on my Win 98 PC, but not on
    XP Home Edition.

    Any more thoughts?
    "Bob" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:40765ea6.158831317@news-server.houston.rr.com...
    > On Thu, 8 Apr 2004 19:36:45 -0400, "Don" <engguy58NOSPAM@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >When I use VPN to connect to my corporate network, it connects OK.
    Internet
    > >Explorer can access the corporate intranet. But I cannot map any network
    > >drives.
    > >
    > >I am using Windows XP Home Edition. On my old Windows 98 PC, I have no
    > >problem mapping the network drives.
    > >
    > >Perhaps I don't have my WinXP network connections configured correctly.
    Can
    > >anyone advise me?
    >
    > Unless you have an XP VPN Client, NetBIOS is unavailable for name
    > resolution. MS deliberately crippled Win2K to make people buy XP. XP
    > has it - look under WINS for TCP/IP in the VPN Client, then enable it.
    >
    > If you do not have NetBIOS in the VPN Client, then use the raw IP
    > address of the VPN machine, e.g.
    >
    > \\192.168.1.X
    >
    > in Start|Run to display the shares on the remote machine. This is
    > bi-directional - you can do it from the VPN Client or the VPN Server.
    >
    > For the VPN Server, the raw IP is the first in the range you allocated
    > for IP addresses on the VPN. For the VPN Client, use a static address
    > (you will have to permit the use of a static VPN Client address in
    > the VPN Server).
    >
    > For example, I set up a Win2K PPTP VPN with address range
    > 192.168.1.100 - 200. I disabled DHCP in the router for that range,
    > thus assuring that no one else would grab one of my reserved
    > addresses. This is not really necessary since MS peer-to-peer only
    > supports 10 users.
    >
    > I also enabled a static address for the VPN Client, namely
    > 192.168.1.150. The VPN Server grabs the first address in the allowed
    > range, namely 192.168.1.100.
    >
    > So now I have the raw IP addresses of the two machines on the VPN.
    > Using Start|Run I create a window displaying the shares for a given
    > remote machine. I then make a shortcut for that window.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Map Of The Vast Right Wing Conspiracy:
    > http://www.freewebs.com/vrwc/
    >
    > You know you are in Hell when you have to make a
    > distinction between what is moral and what is legal.
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

    On Fri, 9 Apr 2004 11:05:09 -0400, "Don" <engguy58NOSPAM@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >The error I get is:

    >The network path: \\111.222.333.444\SubdirectoryName could not be found.

    \\servername\sharename

    "\\servername" is the raw IP address expressed in NetBIOS format. Make
    sure it is the VPN address, e.g., 192.168.1.X. The fact that you did
    not give a valid address in your example above makes me suspect you
    are using a WAN address. A VPN address of the type 192.168.X.X is
    non-routable over the Internet, so telling us what it is would not
    compromise your LAN from the outside.

    "\sharename" is the name you gave the share. Windows uses the same
    name as the directory as the default when you first establish the
    share. It is good practive IMO to make the share name different from
    the directory name. For example, if the directory is "xyz", make the
    sharename "C-XYZ" to indicate that it is on the C: drive.

    Make sure you have given the VPN Client user permission to access that
    share. When you use Start|Run|\\servername to get the shares on that
    machine, you will literally get all the shares, some of which may not
    be permissioned for a given user.


    --

    Map Of The Vast Right Wing Conspiracy:
    http://www.freewebs.com/vrwc/

    You know you are in Hell when you have to make a
    distinction between what is moral and what is legal.
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

    Thank you Bob for your reply. I think you are getting me closer to the
    solution. Apparently, I had been using a WAN address rather than a VPN
    address.

    When I click on the VPN icon after connecting, it gives me a "Destination IP
    Address" of 165.170.74.41 and a "Assigned IP Address" of 165.170.8.17.

    I then selected Start - Run - \\165.170.8.17 and it was accepted! But
    the window that came up did not show anything on my corporate network and I
    was still unable to map any drives (after trying the VPN address or a
    combination of VPN and WAN addresses). So I don't know what to use for a
    "sharename".

    So I hope I'm on the right track, but I'm still unsuccessful.

    Don

    "Bob" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:4076c1f3.5531113@news-server.houston.rr.com...
    > On Fri, 9 Apr 2004 11:05:09 -0400, "Don" <engguy58NOSPAM@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >The error I get is:
    >
    > >The network path: \\111.222.333.444\SubdirectoryName could not be found.
    >
    > \\servername\sharename
    >
    > "\\servername" is the raw IP address expressed in NetBIOS format. Make
    > sure it is the VPN address, e.g., 192.168.1.X. The fact that you did
    > not give a valid address in your example above makes me suspect you
    > are using a WAN address. A VPN address of the type 192.168.X.X is
    > non-routable over the Internet, so telling us what it is would not
    > compromise your LAN from the outside.
    >
    > "\sharename" is the name you gave the share. Windows uses the same
    > name as the directory as the default when you first establish the
    > share. It is good practive IMO to make the share name different from
    > the directory name. For example, if the directory is "xyz", make the
    > sharename "C-XYZ" to indicate that it is on the C: drive.
    >
    > Make sure you have given the VPN Client user permission to access that
    > share. When you use Start|Run|\\servername to get the shares on that
    > machine, you will literally get all the shares, some of which may not
    > be permissioned for a given user.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Map Of The Vast Right Wing Conspiracy:
    > http://www.freewebs.com/vrwc/
    >
    > You know you are in Hell when you have to make a
    > distinction between what is moral and what is legal.
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

    On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 11:28:18 -0400, "Don" <engguy58NOSPAM@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >I then selected Start - Run - \\165.170.8.17 and it was accepted!

    Then you now are looking at the other machine as you wanted. I do not
    believe you would have gotten that window if you did not connect to
    the remote filesystem as a valid user. But make sure you are a valid
    user on the corporate network and that you have permission to access
    various shares.

    >But the window that came up did not show anything on my corporate network
    >So I don't know what to use for a "sharename".

    If there were shares available to anyone (even if you were not
    permissioned) they should have shown up with their sharenames
    displayed.

    You would have then treated them as you would any Windows directory
    scheme, assuming you had permission to open a particular share.

    >So I hope I'm on the right track, but I'm still unsuccessful.

    Time to have a talk with your corporate network administrator.


    --

    Map Of The Vast Right Wing Conspiracy:
    http://www.freewebs.com/vrwc/

    You know you are in Hell when you have to make a
    distinction between what is moral and what is legal.
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