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Premiere rendering times

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August 20, 2004 8:50:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I tried to render an hour and 20 minutes of AVI video with audio in
Premiere 6.5, and it will take about 15 hours. Then I tried to render just
under 40 minutes of video only and Premiere will take over 2 hours. Given
my machine stats (below), is this normal? If not, is there anything I can
do to speed up rendering?


Pentium 4 3.0GHz
1GB DDR RAM
dedicated 120MB video drive


--
Ruben
Anonymous
August 20, 2004 9:30:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

What format were you starting from and which codec were you rendering to?
Without that info it is impossible to help you.

"Ruben" <psychobuffalo@sillyspamspoiler.gmail.com> wrote in message
news:7ZpVc.8827$n04.1560@newssvr27.news.prodigy.com...
> I tried to render an hour and 20 minutes of AVI video with audio in
> Premiere 6.5, and it will take about 15 hours. Then I tried to render just
> under 40 minutes of video only and Premiere will take over 2 hours. Given
> my machine stats (below), is this normal? If not, is there anything I can
> do to speed up rendering?
>
>
> Pentium 4 3.0GHz
> 1GB DDR RAM
> dedicated 120MB video drive
>
>
> --
> Ruben
Anonymous
August 20, 2004 9:30:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

>>I tried to render an hour and 20 minutes of AVI video with audio in
>>Premiere 6.5, and it will take about 15 hours. Then I tried to render just
>>under 40 minutes of video only and Premiere will take over 2 hours. Given
>>my machine stats (below), is this normal? If not, is there anything I can
>>do to speed up rendering?

Depends on the format, output settings, etc.

Keep in mind that you can't really do real-time encoding in software
alone because here's what happens.

Video frame is decoded from HD, sent to Premiere, effects are
applied, video frame is compressed into destination format, frame is
finally written to disk.

Now, to get real-time encoding, you need to have each frame fully
decoded, processed, then reencoded and written to disk in real-time (ie.
1/30th of a second or so for each frame; assuming NTSC frame rate-ish).

No way is any software only processor going to be able to do this,
and even going to dual-processors won't help. Here, you really need a
hardware accellerator card from Maxtor or other companies, and only by
limiting yourself to those effects that can be rendered in real-time,
and limiting the total number of effects that the board can
simultenously process.

You can easily have 2x-100x processing times if you simply add a few
filters, effects, and so forth, and are rendering to a format that does
a lot of CPU processing (any MPEG-2 format for example).

This is why many advanced video programs like Vegas Video are
multi-computer render ready and capable, so that you can send multiple
frames to multiple computers to process simultaneously for real-time or
better rendering of complex video edits. (realistically, those who are
doing multi-computer farms are doing effects so complex, it still takes
2x+ real-time to process...)
Related resources
August 20, 2004 9:53:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"nappy" <no_spam_@sorry.com> wrote in
news:tyqVc.8838$Te4.5754@newssvr27.news.prodigy.com:

> What format were you starting from and which codec were you rendering
> to? Without that info it is impossible to help you.


Sorry - the source files are AVIs using PICVideo MJPEG Codec. I am
exporting for DVD using Premiere's Adobe MPEG Encorder on the DVD NTSC
Medium Bitrate setting.


--
Ruben
Anonymous
August 20, 2004 9:53:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

>> What format were you starting from and which codec were you rendering
>> to? Without that info it is impossible to help you.
>
>Sorry - the source files are AVIs using PICVideo MJPEG Codec. I am
>exporting for DVD using Premiere's Adobe MPEG Encorder on the DVD NTSC
>Medium Bitrate setting.

In general, that subject was discussed recently at the Premiere forum
http://www.adobeforums.com/cgi-bin/webx?13@129.V1Lwcl8p...

I don't use your input codec (what I use is on my Video page at the
jtsmith link in my sig) but from what I have read about mjpeg it is
just "barely" able to be edited/used by Premiere (the fact that it
ends in .AVI really is just a file name, the internals of the file
are determined by the codec) so Premiere is working "really hard" to
convert the input file to the output format

Of course... there may be someone with actual mjpeg experience who
will have better information

John Thomas Smith
http://www.direct2usales.com
http://www.pacifier.com/~jtsmith
August 21, 2004 4:01:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

David Chien <chiendh@uci.edu> wrote in
news:cg61kt$pol$1@news.service.uci.edu:

>>>I tried to render an hour and 20 minutes of AVI video with audio in
>>>Premiere 6.5, and it will take about 15 hours. Then I tried to render
>>>just under 40 minutes of video only and Premiere will take over 2
>>>hours. Given my machine stats (below), is this normal? If not, is
>>>there anything I can do to speed up rendering?
>
> Depends on the format, output settings, etc.
>
> Keep in mind that you can't really do real-time encoding in
> software
> alone because here's what happens.

<snip>

Thanks for the explanation. I didn't expect to get real-time encoding,
but it just seemed that 15 hours for 1.2 hours of video was excessive,
although that may not be the case. I didn't make any custom adjustments
to the export settings, I just took all the defaults, so I wasn't sure if
that was a reasonable time for rendering using Premiere's default export
settings. I am just trying to learn the best settings for what I am
doing.




--
Ruben
Anonymous
August 21, 2004 4:01:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

>>
>> Depends on the format, output settings, etc.
>>


Video effects ?

Frank /~ http://newmex.com/f10
@/
August 21, 2004 4:07:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

John Thomas Smith <jtsmith@pacifier.com> wrote in
news:t61di0d4hu2kkgdg1rofab17ps22d2jmjc@4ax.com:


>>Sorry - the source files are AVIs using PICVideo MJPEG Codec. I am
>>exporting for DVD using Premiere's Adobe MPEG Encorder on the DVD NTSC
>>Medium Bitrate setting.
>
> In general, that subject was discussed recently at the Premiere forum
> http://www.adobeforums.com/cgi-bin/webx?13@129.V1Lwcl8p...
>
> I don't use your input codec (what I use is on my Video page at the
> jtsmith link in my sig) but from what I have read about mjpeg it is
> just "barely" able to be edited/used by Premiere (the fact that it
> ends in .AVI really is just a file name, the internals of the file
> are determined by the codec) so Premiere is working "really hard" to
> convert the input file to the output format
>
> Of course... there may be someone with actual mjpeg experience who
> will have better information


Thanks for the response. The more I am reading the more it seems that
Premiere doesn't like this codec. I had used VirtualDub to capture the
VHS video and create the AVI files with the PICVideo MJPEG codec, but I
think that I will re-capture the video using a different codec.




--
Ruben
Anonymous
August 26, 2004 3:52:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"David Chien" <chiendh@uci.edu> wrote in message news:cg61kt$pol$1@news.service.uci.edu...
> ....
> No way is any software only processor going to be able to do this, and even going to dual-processors won't help. Here, you
> really need a hardware accellerator card from Maxtor or other companies, and only by limiting yourself to those effects that can
> be rendered in real-time, and limiting the total number of effects that the board can simultenously process.

You can get really close to this working with DV. And I would expect
that the next software generation will deliver faster then real-time with DV.

> You can easily have 2x-100x processing times if you simply add a few filters, effects, and so forth, and are rendering to a
> format that does a lot of CPU processing (any MPEG-2 format for example).

Correct, and because of this is, its 'impossible' to say any system is real-time unless
you limit yourself.

>
> This is why many advanced video programs like Vegas Video are multi-computer render ready and capable, so that you can send
> multiple frames to multiple computers to process simultaneously for real-time or better rendering of complex video edits.
> (realistically, those who are doing multi-computer farms are doing effects so complex, it still takes 2x+ real-time to process...)

SD is now 'trivial' for todays HW... the next frontier is HD.
Its 6 time more data to process. So in this case, those 15 hours would jump to 90 hours...

Stephan Schaem
www.seriousmagic.com
!