How to build Powershot A85 Power supply?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

Has anyone built their own DC power supply for an A85? With four AA, it
would need to be 6 volt but what amperage?

What is the pin configuration, center + or -?

Thanks
24 answers Last reply
More about build powershot power supply
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    "The Eye" <eyeonpoliticnospam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:wdCdnVLxiKs1SG7cRVn-oA@rcn.net...
    > Has anyone built their own DC power supply for an A85? With four AA, it
    > would need to be 6 volt but what amperage?
    >
    > What is the pin configuration, center + or -?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    Amperage is around 2-2.5 amps for digital cameras.

    Why built one. You can buy regulated power adapters for $20-30.

    Here is a universal ac adapter for Digital Cameras. About $30.
    http://www.digipowersolutions.com/show_product.php3?pid=100817&Group=AC+Adaptors&Type=A80&Manuf=CANON&subgroup=


    Radio Shack has one(if you can find it):
    Catalog #: 273-1696
    http://www.radioshack.com/searchsku.asp?find=273-1696

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Would that one work on a powershot a400?
    I already have an adapter with a ton of jacks, it says right on the adapter
    what the voltage levels can be set at (multiple levels) but how could I tell
    if it'd provide the right amperage? I'm not super-knowledgable about
    electrical circuitry, just enough to know that there is more to a given
    source of DC than voltage (pressure of electrons) but also amperage(volume
    of electrons at a given voltage).
    Any informed opinions gratefully accepted.


    "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:EERId.18850$wi2.6977@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    > "The Eye" <eyeonpoliticnospam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:wdCdnVLxiKs1SG7cRVn-oA@rcn.net...
    >> Has anyone built their own DC power supply for an A85? With four AA, it
    >> would need to be 6 volt but what amperage?
    >>
    >> What is the pin configuration, center + or -?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >>
    > Amperage is around 2-2.5 amps for digital cameras.
    >
    > Why built one. You can buy regulated power adapters for $20-30.
    >
    > Here is a universal ac adapter for Digital Cameras. About $30.
    > http://www.digipowersolutions.com/show_product.php3?pid=100817&Group=AC+Adaptors&Type=A80&Manuf=CANON&subgroup=
    >
    >
    > Radio Shack has one(if you can find it):
    > Catalog #: 273-1696
    > http://www.radioshack.com/searchsku.asp?find=273-1696
    >
    > --
    > CSM1
    > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > --
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    If the power adapter can supply up to about 2 amperes of current and is
    voltage regulated for the voltage that is set, then it is safe to use on
    just about any digital still camera. (you just have to find the power plug
    that fits and has the correct polarity)

    DO NOT use a power adapter that is NOT regulated.

    The camera will only draw as much current as needed. A power supply with a
    larger current capacity is necessary over a power supply that does not have
    enough current capacity.

    If the power supply does not have enough power (current), the voltage will
    drop to a level too low for the camera to work correctly.

    By the way there is another universal power adapter.
    http://www.bizrate.com/buy/products__att259--221062-,cat_id--46011.html

    The important things to know about power for digital cameras is Voltage,
    Current and Polarity.

    Volt defined:
    The volt is the practical unit of electromotive force (emf), or electric
    potential. It is that potential which will cause a current of one ampere to
    flow through a resistance of one ohm.

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --

    "Tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:aqTId.152141$Xk.123613@pd7tw3no...
    > Would that one work on a powershot a400?
    > I already have an adapter with a ton of jacks, it says right on the
    > adapter what the voltage levels can be set at (multiple levels) but how
    > could I tell if it'd provide the right amperage? I'm not
    > super-knowledgable about electrical circuitry, just enough to know that
    > there is more to a given source of DC than voltage (pressure of electrons)
    > but also amperage(volume of electrons at a given voltage).
    > Any informed opinions gratefully accepted.
    >
    >
    > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:EERId.18850$wi2.6977@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >>
    >> "The Eye" <eyeonpoliticnospam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >> news:wdCdnVLxiKs1SG7cRVn-oA@rcn.net...
    >>> Has anyone built their own DC power supply for an A85? With four AA,
    >>> it would need to be 6 volt but what amperage?
    >>>
    >>> What is the pin configuration, center + or -?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks
    >>>
    >>>
    >> Amperage is around 2-2.5 amps for digital cameras.
    >>
    >> Why built one. You can buy regulated power adapters for $20-30.
    >>
    >> Here is a universal ac adapter for Digital Cameras. About $30.
    >> http://www.digipowersolutions.com/show_product.php3?pid=100817&Group=AC+Adaptors&Type=A80&Manuf=CANON&subgroup=
    >>
    >>
    >> Radio Shack has one(if you can find it):
    >> Catalog #: 273-1696
    >> http://www.radioshack.com/searchsku.asp?find=273-1696
    >>
    >> --
    >> CSM1
    >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> --
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---

    PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a Canadian
    Underwriters Lab Symbol
    Model MWS1189UC
    Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    Current 1700 mA

    -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were rated at 1.2V
    (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home and
    looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished charging
    them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up to the
    large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were connected to an
    actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be even
    less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is rated at
    1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway (especially if I
    turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can handle
    batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long question)

    -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate that it
    is 'Regulated'?

    -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the highest I
    think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that for the
    first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that average
    amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat anyway as
    the battery depleted itself)?

    -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out an average
    of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    >
    > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a Canadian
    > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > Model MWS1189UC
    > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > Current 1700 mA
    >
    > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were rated at
    1.2V
    > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home and
    > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished charging
    > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up to the
    > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were connected to
    an
    > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be even
    > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is rated at
    > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway (especially if
    I
    > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can handle
    > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long
    question)
    >
    > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate that it
    > is 'Regulated'?
    >
    > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the highest I
    > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that for the
    > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that average
    > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat anyway as
    > the battery depleted itself)?
    >
    > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out an
    average
    > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    >
    >
    The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would test the
    adapter before using it on my digital camera.

    Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads open), note
    the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).

    To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm resistor, but
    since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt or more
    resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put power
    supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage stays at
    6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated and safe
    to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)

    However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for supplying
    a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power. If there
    is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be conservative
    with flash use also.

    On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4 volts no
    load.
    Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)

    The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour before
    dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).

    A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour until the
    voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current until the
    battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in that
    shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.

    You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price. The higher
    the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For Digital
    cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    I must not be understanding something properly (please be patient, I'm not
    very technicaly oriented ).:
    -if a battery rated at 300mAh only provides 300mA, how is it possible for a
    300mAh to power one of these cameras at all? Given that the camera needs
    minimun 1700mA( I thought that was what you said, no? Different context
    maybe), and the battery only puts out 300mA? Yet it has been my experience
    that these 300mAh batteries will run a digital camera, just not for very
    long.


    "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    >> Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    >>
    >> PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    >> "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a Canadian
    >> Underwriters Lab Symbol
    >> Model MWS1189UC
    >> Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    >> Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    >> Current 1700 mA
    >>
    >> -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were rated at
    > 1.2V
    >> (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home and
    >> looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished charging
    >> them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up to the
    >> large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were connected to
    > an
    >> actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be even
    >> less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is rated at
    >> 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway (especially if
    > I
    >> turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can handle
    >> batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long
    > question)
    >>
    >> -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate that
    >> it
    >> is 'Regulated'?
    >>
    >> -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the highest I
    >> think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that for the
    >> first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that
    >> average
    >> amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat anyway as
    >> the battery depleted itself)?
    >>
    >> -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out an
    > average
    >> of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    >>
    >>
    > The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would test
    > the
    > adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    >
    > Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads open), note
    > the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    >
    > To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm resistor, but
    > since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt or
    > more
    > resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put power
    > supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage stays
    > at
    > 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated and
    > safe
    > to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    >
    > However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    > supplying
    > a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power. If there
    > is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be conservative
    > with flash use also.
    >
    > On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4 volts
    > no
    > load.
    > Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    >
    > The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour before
    > dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    >
    > A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour until the
    > voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current until the
    > battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in that
    > shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    >
    > You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price. The
    > higher
    > the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For Digital
    > cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    >
    > --
    > CSM1
    > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > --
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the power
    adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts. The
    resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    (1700 ma=1.7 A)

    For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is 4 ohms, so 6
    V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --
    "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    > >
    > > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a Canadian
    > > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > > Model MWS1189UC
    > > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > > Current 1700 mA
    > >
    > > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were rated at
    > 1.2V
    > > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home and
    > > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished charging
    > > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up to the
    > > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were connected
    to
    > an
    > > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be even
    > > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is rated at
    > > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway (especially
    if
    > I
    > > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can handle
    > > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long
    > question)
    > >
    > > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate that
    it
    > > is 'Regulated'?
    > >
    > > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the highest
    I
    > > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that for
    the
    > > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that
    average
    > > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat anyway
    as
    > > the battery depleted itself)?
    > >
    > > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out an
    > average
    > > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    > >
    > >
    > The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would test
    the
    > adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    >
    > Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads open), note
    > the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    >
    > To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm resistor, but
    > since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt or
    more
    > resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put power
    > supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage stays
    at
    > 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated and
    safe
    > to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    >
    > However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    supplying
    > a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power. If there
    > is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be conservative
    > with flash use also.
    >
    > On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4 volts
    no
    > load.
    > Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    >
    > The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour before
    > dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    >
    > A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour until the
    > voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current until the
    > battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in that
    > shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    >
    > You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price. The
    higher
    > the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For Digital
    > cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    >
    > --
    > CSM1
    > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > --
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Question: Will a 300 mah battery power a digital camera?
    The short answer is not for very long. A 300 mah battery will supply 1700 ma
    for a very short time. About 10-11 minutes.

    As long as the voltage is present, the load will draw as much current as
    demanded. If the camera looks like a 3.5 ohm resistor to the 6 volt battery,
    the battery will try to supply 1700 ma. (It is Ohms law) Ohms law is voltage
    divided by resistance in ohms equals current in amps. E/R=I where E is
    Voltage, R is resistance in ohms and I is current in amps.

    What happens with batteries, the voltage drops with the more load put on it.
    You would not want to put a short on a strong battery, such as your car
    battery, it will explode.

    Use 1600 mah or more. A 1600 mah battery will supply 1600 ma for one hour
    until the battery voltage drops to around 1 volt. 1600 ma = 1.6 amperes.

    A 2300 mah battery = 2.3 amperes for one hour. At 1700 ma load, it will last
    longer.

    I miscalculated the resistor to test the power adapter. Use a 4 ohm 10 watt
    wire wound resistor.

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --
    "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:cfbJd.160009$6l.43964@pd7tw2no...
    > I must not be understanding something properly (please be patient, I'm not
    > very technicaly oriented ).:
    > -if a battery rated at 300mAh only provides 300mA, how is it possible for
    a
    > 300mAh to power one of these cameras at all? Given that the camera needs
    > minimun 1700mA( I thought that was what you said, no? Different context
    > maybe), and the battery only puts out 300mA? Yet it has been my
    experience
    > that these 300mAh batteries will run a digital camera, just not for very
    > long.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > > news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > >> Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    > >>
    > >> PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > >> "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a Canadian
    > >> Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > >> Model MWS1189UC
    > >> Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > >> Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > >> Current 1700 mA
    > >>
    > >> -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were rated at
    > > 1.2V
    > >> (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home and
    > >> looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished charging
    > >> them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up to
    the
    > >> large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were connected
    to
    > > an
    > >> actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be even
    > >> less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is rated at
    > >> 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway (especially
    if
    > > I
    > >> turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can
    handle
    > >> batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long
    > > question)
    > >>
    > >> -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate that
    > >> it
    > >> is 'Regulated'?
    > >>
    > >> -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the highest
    I
    > >> think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that for
    the
    > >> first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that
    > >> average
    > >> amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat anyway
    as
    > >> the battery depleted itself)?
    > >>
    > >> -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out an
    > > average
    > >> of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    > >>
    > >>
    > > The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would test
    > > the
    > > adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    > >
    > > Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads open),
    note
    > > the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    > >
    > > To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm resistor,
    but
    > > since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt or
    > > more
    > > resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put power
    > > supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage
    stays
    > > at
    > > 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated and
    > > safe
    > > to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    > >
    > > However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    > > supplying
    > > a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power. If
    there
    > > is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be conservative
    > > with flash use also.
    > >
    > > On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4 volts
    > > no
    > > load.
    > > Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    > >
    > > The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour
    before
    > > dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    > >
    > > A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour until
    the
    > > voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current until
    the
    > > battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in that
    > > shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    > >
    > > You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price. The
    > > higher
    > > the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For Digital
    > > cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    > >
    > > --
    > > CSM1
    > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > --
    > >
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify the color
    codes?
    I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black, gold,
    brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that critical in this
    case.
    I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right bands --- CSM1?

    "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the power
    > adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts. The
    > resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    > (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    >
    > For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is 4 ohms, so
    > 6
    > V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    >
    > --
    > CSM1
    > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > --
    > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    >> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    >> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    >> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    >> >
    >> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    >> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a Canadian
    >> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    >> > Model MWS1189UC
    >> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    >> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    >> > Current 1700 mA
    >> >
    >> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were rated at
    >> 1.2V
    >> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home and
    >> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished charging
    >> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up to
    >> > the
    >> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were connected
    > to
    >> an
    >> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be even
    >> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is rated at
    >> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway (especially
    > if
    >> I
    >> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can
    >> > handle
    >> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long
    >> question)
    >> >
    >> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate that
    > it
    >> > is 'Regulated'?
    >> >
    >> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the highest
    > I
    >> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that for
    > the
    >> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that
    > average
    >> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat anyway
    > as
    >> > the battery depleted itself)?
    >> >
    >> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out an
    >> average
    >> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    >> >
    >> >
    >> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would test
    > the
    >> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    >>
    >> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads open),
    >> note
    >> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    >>
    >> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm resistor, but
    >> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt or
    > more
    >> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put power
    >> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage stays
    > at
    >> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated and
    > safe
    >> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    >>
    >> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    > supplying
    >> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power. If
    >> there
    >> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be conservative
    >> with flash use also.
    >>
    >> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4 volts
    > no
    >> load.
    >> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    >>
    >> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour
    >> before
    >> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    >>
    >> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour until the
    >> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current until
    >> the
    >> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in that
    >> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    >>
    >> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price. The
    > higher
    >> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For Digital
    >> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    >>
    >> --
    >> CSM1
    >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> --
    >>
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    You made me think, it has been a long time since I read color codes.
    Black Yellow Black

    1st band Color is on one end of the resistor. Read Left to Right.
    First significant figure Black is 0
    Second significant figureYellow is 4
    Multiplier Black is 1
    Fourth band is tolerance.
    Gold = 5%
    Silver=10%
    No color= 20%

    Values of less that one ohm then use the multiplier of Gold = 0.1 and
    Silver=0.01. Which is Gold divide by 10 or Silver divide by 100.

    10 Watt wire wound resistors usually do not have color codes. The value is
    printed on the light brown square.

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --

    "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify the
    > color codes?
    > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black, gold,
    > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that critical in this
    > case.
    > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right bands --- CSM1?
    >
    > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >>I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the power
    >> adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts. The
    >> resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    >> (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    >>
    >> For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is 4 ohms,
    >> so 6
    >> V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    >>
    >> --
    >> CSM1
    >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> --
    >> "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    >>> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    >>> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    >>> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    >>> >
    >>> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    >>> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a Canadian
    >>> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    >>> > Model MWS1189UC
    >>> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    >>> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    >>> > Current 1700 mA
    >>> >
    >>> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were rated
    >>> > at
    >>> 1.2V
    >>> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home and
    >>> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished
    >>> > charging
    >>> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up to
    >>> > the
    >>> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were connected
    >> to
    >>> an
    >>> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be even
    >>> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is rated
    >>> > at
    >>> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway (especially
    >> if
    >>> I
    >>> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can
    >>> > handle
    >>> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long
    >>> question)
    >>> >
    >>> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate
    >>> > that
    >> it
    >>> > is 'Regulated'?
    >>> >
    >>> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the
    >>> > highest
    >> I
    >>> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that for
    >> the
    >>> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that
    >> average
    >>> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat anyway
    >> as
    >>> > the battery depleted itself)?
    >>> >
    >>> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out an
    >>> average
    >>> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would test
    >> the
    >>> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    >>>
    >>> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads open),
    >>> note
    >>> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    >>>
    >>> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm resistor,
    >>> but
    >>> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt or
    >> more
    >>> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put power
    >>> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage
    >>> stays
    >> at
    >>> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated and
    >> safe
    >>> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    >>>
    >>> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    >> supplying
    >>> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power. If
    >>> there
    >>> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be conservative
    >>> with flash use also.
    >>>
    >>> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4 volts
    >> no
    >>> load.
    >>> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    >>>
    >>> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour
    >>> before
    >>> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    >>>
    >>> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour until
    >>> the
    >>> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current until
    >>> the
    >>> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in that
    >>> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    >>>
    >>> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price. The
    >> higher
    >>> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For Digital
    >>> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> CSM1
    >>> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    There are no bands on a 10W resistor. The rating is printed on the side or
    top.

    If you require 10 Watts if actual power, a 25W resistor would last much
    longer, not burn up as quickly, disapate the heat better (run cooler to the
    touch). Yes a 10W resistor is capable of disapating 10watts but only at it's
    maximum rated temperature that will burn you if you touch it.

    Remember that the power is proportional to the square of the appplied
    voltage and even a slight voltage fluctuation can push the power over the
    rating quite easily.


    "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:h6gJd.24007$iC4.7314@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > You made me think, it has been a long time since I read color codes.
    > Black Yellow Black
    >
    > 1st band Color is on one end of the resistor. Read Left to Right.
    > First significant figure Black is 0
    > Second significant figureYellow is 4
    > Multiplier Black is 1
    > Fourth band is tolerance.
    > Gold = 5%
    > Silver=10%
    > No color= 20%
    >
    > Values of less that one ohm then use the multiplier of Gold = 0.1 and
    > Silver=0.01. Which is Gold divide by 10 or Silver divide by 100.
    >
    > 10 Watt wire wound resistors usually do not have color codes. The value
    is
    > printed on the light brown square.
    >
    > --
    > CSM1
    > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > --
    >
    > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    > > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify the
    > > color codes?
    > > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black, gold,
    > > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that critical in
    this
    > > case.
    > > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right bands ---
    CSM1?
    > >
    > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > >>I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the power
    > >> adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts. The
    > >> resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    > >> (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    > >>
    > >> For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is 4 ohms,
    > >> so 6
    > >> V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> CSM1
    > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> --
    > >> "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > >>> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > >>> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > >>> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    > >>> >
    > >>> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > >>> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a Canadian
    > >>> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > >>> > Model MWS1189UC
    > >>> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > >>> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > >>> > Current 1700 mA
    > >>> >
    > >>> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were rated
    > >>> > at
    > >>> 1.2V
    > >>> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home
    and
    > >>> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished
    > >>> > charging
    > >>> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up to
    > >>> > the
    > >>> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were
    connected
    > >> to
    > >>> an
    > >>> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be even
    > >>> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is rated
    > >>> > at
    > >>> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway
    (especially
    > >> if
    > >>> I
    > >>> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can
    > >>> > handle
    > >>> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long
    > >>> question)
    > >>> >
    > >>> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate
    > >>> > that
    > >> it
    > >>> > is 'Regulated'?
    > >>> >
    > >>> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the
    > >>> > highest
    > >> I
    > >>> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that
    for
    > >> the
    > >>> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that
    > >> average
    > >>> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat
    anyway
    > >> as
    > >>> > the battery depleted itself)?
    > >>> >
    > >>> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out an
    > >>> average
    > >>> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    > >>> >
    > >>> >
    > >>> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would
    test
    > >> the
    > >>> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    > >>>
    > >>> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads open),
    > >>> note
    > >>> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    > >>>
    > >>> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm resistor,
    > >>> but
    > >>> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt or
    > >> more
    > >>> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put
    power
    > >>> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage
    > >>> stays
    > >> at
    > >>> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated
    and
    > >> safe
    > >>> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    > >>>
    > >>> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    > >> supplying
    > >>> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power. If
    > >>> there
    > >>> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be
    conservative
    > >>> with flash use also.
    > >>>
    > >>> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4
    volts
    > >> no
    > >>> load.
    > >>> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    > >>>
    > >>> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour
    > >>> before
    > >>> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    > >>>
    > >>> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour until
    > >>> the
    > >>> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current until
    > >>> the
    > >>> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in
    that
    > >>> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    > >>>
    > >>> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price. The
    > >> higher
    > >>> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For Digital
    > >>> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    > >>>
    > >>> --
    > >>> CSM1
    > >>> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >>> --
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    I have a 4.7 ohm 2 watt resistor.
    The color bands are yellow,violet,gold.
    So the bands for 4 ohms would be yellow, black,gold.

    Or they could be black,yellow,black.

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --
    "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify the
    color
    > codes?
    > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black, gold,
    > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that critical in this
    > case.
    > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right bands --- CSM1?
    >
    > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > >I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the power
    > > adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts. The
    > > resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    > > (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    > >
    > > For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is 4 ohms,
    so
    > > 6
    > > V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    > >
    > > --
    > > CSM1
    > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > --
    > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > >> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > >> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    > >> >
    > >> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > >> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a Canadian
    > >> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > >> > Model MWS1189UC
    > >> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > >> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > >> > Current 1700 mA
    > >> >
    > >> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were rated
    at
    > >> 1.2V
    > >> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home
    and
    > >> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished
    charging
    > >> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up to
    > >> > the
    > >> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were
    connected
    > > to
    > >> an
    > >> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be even
    > >> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is rated
    at
    > >> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway
    (especially
    > > if
    > >> I
    > >> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can
    > >> > handle
    > >> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long
    > >> question)
    > >> >
    > >> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate
    that
    > > it
    > >> > is 'Regulated'?
    > >> >
    > >> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the
    highest
    > > I
    > >> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that for
    > > the
    > >> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that
    > > average
    > >> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat
    anyway
    > > as
    > >> > the battery depleted itself)?
    > >> >
    > >> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out an
    > >> average
    > >> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would
    test
    > > the
    > >> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    > >>
    > >> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads open),
    > >> note
    > >> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    > >>
    > >> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm resistor,
    but
    > >> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt or
    > > more
    > >> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put power
    > >> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage
    stays
    > > at
    > >> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated and
    > > safe
    > >> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    > >>
    > >> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    > > supplying
    > >> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power. If
    > >> there
    > >> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be
    conservative
    > >> with flash use also.
    > >>
    > >> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4
    volts
    > > no
    > >> load.
    > >> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    > >>
    > >> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour
    > >> before
    > >> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    > >>
    > >> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour until
    the
    > >> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current until
    > >> the
    > >> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in that
    > >> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    > >>
    > >> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price. The
    > > higher
    > >> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For Digital
    > >> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> CSM1
    > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> --
    > >>
    > >
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Black, yellow, black isn't used in standard colour codes

    "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:JrgJd.19308$wi2.2137@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > I have a 4.7 ohm 2 watt resistor.
    > The color bands are yellow,violet,gold.
    > So the bands for 4 ohms would be yellow, black,gold.
    >
    > Or they could be black,yellow,black.
    >
    > --
    > CSM1
    > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > --
    > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    > > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify the
    > color
    > > codes?
    > > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black, gold,
    > > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that critical in
    this
    > > case.
    > > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right bands ---
    CSM1?
    > >
    > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > > >I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the power
    > > > adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts. The
    > > > resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    > > > (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    > > >
    > > > For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is 4
    ohms,
    > so
    > > > 6
    > > > V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > CSM1
    > > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > > --
    > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > > >> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > > >> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > > >> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    > > >> >
    > > >> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > > >> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a
    Canadian
    > > >> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > > >> > Model MWS1189UC
    > > >> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > > >> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > > >> > Current 1700 mA
    > > >> >
    > > >> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were
    rated
    > at
    > > >> 1.2V
    > > >> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got home
    > and
    > > >> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished
    > charging
    > > >> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up
    to
    > > >> > the
    > > >> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were
    > connected
    > > > to
    > > >> an
    > > >> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be
    even
    > > >> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is
    rated
    > at
    > > >> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway
    > (especially
    > > > if
    > > >> I
    > > >> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can
    > > >> > handle
    > > >> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry, long
    > > >> question)
    > > >> >
    > > >> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all, indicate
    > that
    > > > it
    > > >> > is 'Regulated'?
    > > >> >
    > > >> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the
    > highest
    > > > I
    > > >> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that
    for
    > > > the
    > > >> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out that
    > > > average
    > > >> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat
    > anyway
    > > > as
    > > >> > the battery depleted itself)?
    > > >> >
    > > >> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out
    an
    > > >> average
    > > >> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    > > >> >
    > > >> >
    > > >> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would
    > test
    > > > the
    > > >> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    > > >>
    > > >> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads open),
    > > >> note
    > > >> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    > > >>
    > > >> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm resistor,
    > but
    > > >> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt
    or
    > > > more
    > > >> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put
    power
    > > >> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage
    > stays
    > > > at
    > > >> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated
    and
    > > > safe
    > > >> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    > > >>
    > > >> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    > > > supplying
    > > >> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power. If
    > > >> there
    > > >> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be
    > conservative
    > > >> with flash use also.
    > > >>
    > > >> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4
    > volts
    > > > no
    > > >> load.
    > > >> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    > > >>
    > > >> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour
    > > >> before
    > > >> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    > > >>
    > > >> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour until
    > the
    > > >> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current
    until
    > > >> the
    > > >> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in
    that
    > > >> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    > > >>
    > > >> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price. The
    > > > higher
    > > >> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For Digital
    > > >> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    > > >>
    > > >> --
    > > >> CSM1
    > > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > >> --
    > > >>
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    It has been years, I did not remember that the Gold and Silver multiplier is
    used below 10 ohms. I though it was one ohm.

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --
    "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    news:idydnY4SXqGWCmjcRVn-sg@golden.net...
    > Black, yellow, black isn't used in standard colour codes
    >
    > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:JrgJd.19308$wi2.2137@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > > I have a 4.7 ohm 2 watt resistor.
    > > The color bands are yellow,violet,gold.
    > > So the bands for 4 ohms would be yellow, black,gold.
    > >
    > > Or they could be black,yellow,black.
    > >
    > > --
    > > CSM1
    > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > --
    > > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > > news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    > > > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify the
    > > color
    > > > codes?
    > > > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black,
    gold,
    > > > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that critical in
    > this
    > > > case.
    > > > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right bands ---
    > CSM1?
    > > >
    > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > > > >I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the power
    > > > > adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts. The
    > > > > resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    > > > > (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    > > > >
    > > > > For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is 4
    > ohms,
    > > so
    > > > > 6
    > > > > V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    > > > >
    > > > > --
    > > > > CSM1
    > > > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > > > --
    > > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > > > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > > > >> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > > > >> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > > > >> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > > > >> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a
    > Canadian
    > > > >> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > > > >> > Model MWS1189UC
    > > > >> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > > > >> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > > > >> > Current 1700 mA
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were
    > rated
    > > at
    > > > >> 1.2V
    > > > >> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got
    home
    > > and
    > > > >> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished
    > > charging
    > > > >> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked up
    > to
    > > > >> > the
    > > > >> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were
    > > connected
    > > > > to
    > > > >> an
    > > > >> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be
    > even
    > > > >> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is
    > rated
    > > at
    > > > >> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway
    > > (especially
    > > > > if
    > > > >> I
    > > > >> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly can
    > > > >> > handle
    > > > >> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry,
    long
    > > > >> question)
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all,
    indicate
    > > that
    > > > > it
    > > > >> > is 'Regulated'?
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the
    > > highest
    > > > > I
    > > > >> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly that
    > for
    > > > > the
    > > > >> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out
    that
    > > > > average
    > > > >> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat
    > > anyway
    > > > > as
    > > > >> > the battery depleted itself)?
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts out
    > an
    > > > >> average
    > > > >> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I would
    > > test
    > > > > the
    > > > >> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads
    open),
    > > > >> note
    > > > >> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    > > > >>
    > > > >> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm
    resistor,
    > > but
    > > > >> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one watt
    > or
    > > > > more
    > > > >> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put
    > power
    > > > >> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the voltage
    > > stays
    > > > > at
    > > > >> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is regulated
    > and
    > > > > safe
    > > > >> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    > > > >>
    > > > >> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    > > > > supplying
    > > > >> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power.
    If
    > > > >> there
    > > > >> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be
    > > conservative
    > > > >> with flash use also.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about 1.3-1.4
    > > volts
    > > > > no
    > > > >> load.
    > > > >> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    > > > >>
    > > > >> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one hour
    > > > >> before
    > > > >> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    > > > >>
    > > > >> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour
    until
    > > the
    > > > >> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current
    > until
    > > > >> the
    > > > >> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection built-in
    > that
    > > > >> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price.
    The
    > > > > higher
    > > > >> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For
    Digital
    > > > >> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> --
    > > > >> CSM1
    > > > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > > >> --
    > > > >>
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Precision resirtors are printed text on the side. I believe precision
    resistors can be ordered custom made or from a big supplier in any value
    desired for not too bad a price (a few years back). The time wait for them
    is brutal though.

    "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:btiJd.24026$iC4.15242@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > It has been years, I did not remember that the Gold and Silver multiplier
    is
    > used below 10 ohms. I though it was one ohm.
    >
    > --
    > CSM1
    > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > --
    > "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    > news:idydnY4SXqGWCmjcRVn-sg@golden.net...
    > > Black, yellow, black isn't used in standard colour codes
    > >
    > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:JrgJd.19308$wi2.2137@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > > > I have a 4.7 ohm 2 watt resistor.
    > > > The color bands are yellow,violet,gold.
    > > > So the bands for 4 ohms would be yellow, black,gold.
    > > >
    > > > Or they could be black,yellow,black.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > CSM1
    > > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > > --
    > > > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > > > news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    > > > > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify
    the
    > > > color
    > > > > codes?
    > > > > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black,
    > gold,
    > > > > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that critical
    in
    > > this
    > > > > case.
    > > > > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right bands ---
    > > CSM1?
    > > > >
    > > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > > > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > > > > >I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the
    power
    > > > > > adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts. The
    > > > > > resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    > > > > > (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    > > > > >
    > > > > > For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is 4
    > > ohms,
    > > > so
    > > > > > 6
    > > > > > V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > --
    > > > > > CSM1
    > > > > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > > > > --
    > > > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > > > > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > > > > >> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > > > > >> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > > > > >> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    > > > > >> >
    > > > > >> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > > > > >> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a
    > > Canadian
    > > > > >> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > > > > >> > Model MWS1189UC
    > > > > >> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > > > > >> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > > > > >> > Current 1700 mA
    > > > > >> >
    > > > > >> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were
    > > rated
    > > > at
    > > > > >> 1.2V
    > > > > >> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got
    > home
    > > > and
    > > > > >> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished
    > > > charging
    > > > > >> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked
    up
    > > to
    > > > > >> > the
    > > > > >> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were
    > > > connected
    > > > > > to
    > > > > >> an
    > > > > >> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would be
    > > even
    > > > > >> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is
    > > rated
    > > > at
    > > > > >> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway
    > > > (especially
    > > > > > if
    > > > > >> I
    > > > > >> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly
    can
    > > > > >> > handle
    > > > > >> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry,
    > long
    > > > > >> question)
    > > > > >> >
    > > > > >> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all,
    > indicate
    > > > that
    > > > > > it
    > > > > >> > is 'Regulated'?
    > > > > >> >
    > > > > >> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or the
    > > > highest
    > > > > > I
    > > > > >> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly
    that
    > > for
    > > > > > the
    > > > > >> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out
    > that
    > > > > > average
    > > > > >> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it, somewhat
    > > > anyway
    > > > > > as
    > > > > >> > the battery depleted itself)?
    > > > > >> >
    > > > > >> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts
    out
    > > an
    > > > > >> average
    > > > > >> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's lifetime?
    > > > > >> >
    > > > > >> >
    > > > > >> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I
    would
    > > > test
    > > > > > the
    > > > > >> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads
    > open),
    > > > > >> note
    > > > > >> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm
    > resistor,
    > > > but
    > > > > >> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one
    watt
    > > or
    > > > > > more
    > > > > >> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch). Put
    > > power
    > > > > >> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the
    voltage
    > > > stays
    > > > > > at
    > > > > >> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is
    regulated
    > > and
    > > > > > safe
    > > > > >> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity for
    > > > > > supplying
    > > > > >> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most power.
    > If
    > > > > >> there
    > > > > >> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be
    > > > conservative
    > > > > >> with flash use also.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about
    1.3-1.4
    > > > volts
    > > > > > no
    > > > > >> load.
    > > > > >> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one
    hour
    > > > > >> before
    > > > > >> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour
    > until
    > > > the
    > > > > >> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current
    > > until
    > > > > >> the
    > > > > >> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection
    built-in
    > > that
    > > > > >> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price.
    > The
    > > > > > higher
    > > > > >> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For
    > Digital
    > > > > >> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> --
    > > > > >> CSM1
    > > > > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > > > > >> --
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Ok, well it looks good, actually. I found a resistor that didn't have color
    bands on it, but was red, and had 4R(7 or Z couldn't tell), and +-5% on the
    other side. Since it is only necessary to hook it up momentarily to a low
    voltage I wasn't that worried about heat dissipation capacity.
    I checked the R with my multimetere and it showed exactly 4 Ohms of
    resistance.
    Then I set the adapter at 3V, with no load but the meter, and tested --- it
    showed exactly 3V, to within a hair actually.
    Then I put the resistor in parallel with the meter and it showed exactly the
    same voltage, no perceptible drop. And I know I had good connection with
    the resistor becaue, boy, did it ever get hot --- in the two seconds that
    power was applied, it got too hot to touch and I could smell the 'hot
    component' smell! No smoke, but next time I do something like this I'll pay
    more attention to power ratings, I think.
    So there doesn't seem to be a problem with the adapter supplying enough amps
    to a the camera, is there any way to ensure it won't push too much?
    No, I guess not because you said that the camera will only take what it
    needs, right? The only potential problem was that it couldn't supply ENOUGH
    amps, and the voltage would sag(if I have it right), if it wasn't regulated.
    Now there's another problem with using this adapter, which is that not one,
    out of the dozen or so jacks that came with the adapter, fits the DC In
    receptacle on the camera. I'll go hunt around 2nd hand shops and see what I
    can find.

    How's my methodology here, guys? Am I making any glaring mistakes?


    "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    news:BaqdnTo-ALbsKWjcRVn-pg@golden.net...
    > Precision resirtors are printed text on the side. I believe precision
    > resistors can be ordered custom made or from a big supplier in any value
    > desired for not too bad a price (a few years back). The time wait for them
    > is brutal though.
    >
    > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:btiJd.24026$iC4.15242@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    >> It has been years, I did not remember that the Gold and Silver multiplier
    > is
    >> used below 10 ohms. I though it was one ohm.
    >>
    >> --
    >> CSM1
    >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> --
    >> "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    >> news:idydnY4SXqGWCmjcRVn-sg@golden.net...
    >> > Black, yellow, black isn't used in standard colour codes
    >> >
    >> > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    >> > news:JrgJd.19308$wi2.2137@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >> > > I have a 4.7 ohm 2 watt resistor.
    >> > > The color bands are yellow,violet,gold.
    >> > > So the bands for 4 ohms would be yellow, black,gold.
    >> > >
    >> > > Or they could be black,yellow,black.
    >> > >
    >> > > --
    >> > > CSM1
    >> > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> > > --
    >> > > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    >> > > news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    >> > > > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify
    > the
    >> > > color
    >> > > > codes?
    >> > > > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black,
    >> gold,
    >> > > > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that critical
    > in
    >> > this
    >> > > > case.
    >> > > > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right
    >> > > > bands ---
    >> > CSM1?
    >> > > >
    >> > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    >> > > > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >> > > > >I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the
    > power
    >> > > > > adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts.
    >> > > > > The
    >> > > > > resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    >> > > > > (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    >> > > > >
    >> > > > > For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is 4
    >> > ohms,
    >> > > so
    >> > > > > 6
    >> > > > > V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    >> > > > >
    >> > > > > --
    >> > > > > CSM1
    >> > > > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> > > > > --
    >> > > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    >> > > > > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    >> > > > >> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    >> > > > >> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    >> > > > >> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    >> > > > >> >
    >> > > > >> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    >> > > > >> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a
    >> > Canadian
    >> > > > >> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    >> > > > >> > Model MWS1189UC
    >> > > > >> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    >> > > > >> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    >> > > > >> > Current 1700 mA
    >> > > > >> >
    >> > > > >> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that were
    >> > rated
    >> > > at
    >> > > > >> 1.2V
    >> > > > >> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I got
    >> home
    >> > > and
    >> > > > >> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I finished
    >> > > charging
    >> > > > >> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when hooked
    > up
    >> > to
    >> > > > >> > the
    >> > > > >> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were
    >> > > connected
    >> > > > > to
    >> > > > >> an
    >> > > > >> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would
    >> > > > >> > be
    >> > even
    >> > > > >> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter is
    >> > rated
    >> > > at
    >> > > > >> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway
    >> > > (especially
    >> > > > > if
    >> > > > >> I
    >> > > > >> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it clearly
    > can
    >> > > > >> > handle
    >> > > > >> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V? (sorry,
    >> long
    >> > > > >> question)
    >> > > > >> >
    >> > > > >> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all,
    >> indicate
    >> > > that
    >> > > > > it
    >> > > > >> > is 'Regulated'?
    >> > > > >> >
    >> > > > >> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or
    >> > > > >> > the
    >> > > highest
    >> > > > > I
    >> > > > >> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly
    > that
    >> > for
    >> > > > > the
    >> > > > >> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put out
    >> that
    >> > > > > average
    >> > > > >> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it,
    >> > > > >> > somewhat
    >> > > anyway
    >> > > > > as
    >> > > > >> > the battery depleted itself)?
    >> > > > >> >
    >> > > > >> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it puts
    > out
    >> > an
    >> > > > >> average
    >> > > > >> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's
    >> > > > >> > lifetime?
    >> > > > >> >
    >> > > > >> >
    >> > > > >> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I
    > would
    >> > > test
    >> > > > > the
    >> > > > >> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    >> > > > >>
    >> > > > >> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads
    >> open),
    >> > > > >> note
    >> > > > >> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    >> > > > >>
    >> > > > >> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm
    >> resistor,
    >> > > but
    >> > > > >> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one
    > watt
    >> > or
    >> > > > > more
    >> > > > >> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch).
    >> > > > >> Put
    >> > power
    >> > > > >> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the
    > voltage
    >> > > stays
    >> > > > > at
    >> > > > >> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is
    > regulated
    >> > and
    >> > > > > safe
    >> > > > >> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    >> > > > >>
    >> > > > >> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity
    >> > > > >> for
    >> > > > > supplying
    >> > > > >> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most
    >> > > > >> power.
    >> If
    >> > > > >> there
    >> > > > >> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be
    >> > > conservative
    >> > > > >> with flash use also.
    >> > > > >>
    >> > > > >> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about
    > 1.3-1.4
    >> > > volts
    >> > > > > no
    >> > > > >> load.
    >> > > > >> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    >> > > > >>
    >> > > > >> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one
    > hour
    >> > > > >> before
    >> > > > >> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    >> > > > >>
    >> > > > >> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one hour
    >> until
    >> > > the
    >> > > > >> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some current
    >> > until
    >> > > > >> the
    >> > > > >> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection
    > built-in
    >> > that
    >> > > > >> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    >> > > > >>
    >> > > > >> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best price.
    >> The
    >> > > > > higher
    >> > > > >> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For
    >> Digital
    >> > > > >> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    >> > > > >>
    >> > > > >> --
    >> > > > >> CSM1
    >> > > > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> > > > >> --
    >> > > > >>
    >> > > > >
    >> > > >
    >> > > >
    >> > >
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >
    >
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    That was probably a good enough test.

    Since the voltage did not change from no load to half full load, the power
    supply is regulated.
    The next most important thing is to get the polarity correct.

    Look closely at the symbol next to the power connector on the camera, it
    should have the polarity marked.
    Use a magnifying glass to see the + or - symbol in the center of the
    semicircle.

    Wire a connector to the power supply that fits the camera. Make sure the
    polarity is correct for the center connector of the plug.
    Put the power supply on 3 volts and DO NOT change to any other voltage.

    The A400 uses 2 AA batteries, so the voltage required is 3 volts.

    It would be a good idea to put tape on the voltage switch, so that it does
    not get changed accidentally.

    Be brave, try it on the camera.

    If you want to buy the ACK 800 AC adapter kit, click this link. I have seen
    it for $30 at amazon.com.
    http://www.google.com/froogle?q=AC+adapter+kit+ACK800+&btnG=Search+Froogle

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --
    "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:WEjJd.163793$8l.10981@pd7tw1no...
    > Ok, well it looks good, actually. I found a resistor that didn't have
    color
    > bands on it, but was red, and had 4R(7 or Z couldn't tell), and +-5% on
    the
    > other side. Since it is only necessary to hook it up momentarily to a low
    > voltage I wasn't that worried about heat dissipation capacity.
    > I checked the R with my multimetere and it showed exactly 4 Ohms of
    > resistance.
    > Then I set the adapter at 3V, with no load but the meter, and tested ---
    it
    > showed exactly 3V, to within a hair actually.
    > Then I put the resistor in parallel with the meter and it showed exactly
    the
    > same voltage, no perceptible drop. And I know I had good connection with
    > the resistor becaue, boy, did it ever get hot --- in the two seconds that
    > power was applied, it got too hot to touch and I could smell the 'hot
    > component' smell! No smoke, but next time I do something like this I'll
    pay
    > more attention to power ratings, I think.
    > So there doesn't seem to be a problem with the adapter supplying enough
    amps
    > to a the camera, is there any way to ensure it won't push too much?
    > No, I guess not because you said that the camera will only take what it
    > needs, right? The only potential problem was that it couldn't supply
    ENOUGH
    > amps, and the voltage would sag(if I have it right), if it wasn't
    regulated.
    > Now there's another problem with using this adapter, which is that not
    one,
    > out of the dozen or so jacks that came with the adapter, fits the DC In
    > receptacle on the camera. I'll go hunt around 2nd hand shops and see what
    I
    > can find.
    >
    > How's my methodology here, guys? Am I making any glaring mistakes?
    >
    >
    >
    > "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    > news:BaqdnTo-ALbsKWjcRVn-pg@golden.net...
    > > Precision resirtors are printed text on the side. I believe precision
    > > resistors can be ordered custom made or from a big supplier in any value
    > > desired for not too bad a price (a few years back). The time wait for
    them
    > > is brutal though.
    > >
    > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:btiJd.24026$iC4.15242@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> It has been years, I did not remember that the Gold and Silver
    multiplier
    > > is
    > >> used below 10 ohms. I though it was one ohm.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> CSM1
    > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> --
    > >> "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    > >> news:idydnY4SXqGWCmjcRVn-sg@golden.net...
    > >> > Black, yellow, black isn't used in standard colour codes
    > >> >
    > >> > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > >> > news:JrgJd.19308$wi2.2137@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> > > I have a 4.7 ohm 2 watt resistor.
    > >> > > The color bands are yellow,violet,gold.
    > >> > > So the bands for 4 ohms would be yellow, black,gold.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > Or they could be black,yellow,black.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > --
    > >> > > CSM1
    > >> > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> > > --
    > >> > > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > >> > > news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    > >> > > > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify
    > > the
    > >> > > color
    > >> > > > codes?
    > >> > > > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black,
    > >> gold,
    > >> > > > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that
    critical
    > > in
    > >> > this
    > >> > > > case.
    > >> > > > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right
    > >> > > > bands ---
    > >> > CSM1?
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > >> > > > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> > > > >I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the
    > > power
    > >> > > > > adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts.
    > >> > > > > The
    > >> > > > > resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    > >> > > > > (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > > For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is
    4
    > >> > ohms,
    > >> > > so
    > >> > > > > 6
    > >> > > > > V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > > --
    > >> > > > > CSM1
    > >> > > > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> > > > > --
    > >> > > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > >> > > > > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> > > > >> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > >> > > > >> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > >> > > > >> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > >> > > > >> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a
    > >> > Canadian
    > >> > > > >> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > >> > > > >> > Model MWS1189UC
    > >> > > > >> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > >> > > > >> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > >> > > > >> > Current 1700 mA
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that
    were
    > >> > rated
    > >> > > at
    > >> > > > >> 1.2V
    > >> > > > >> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I
    got
    > >> home
    > >> > > and
    > >> > > > >> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I
    finished
    > >> > > charging
    > >> > > > >> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when
    hooked
    > > up
    > >> > to
    > >> > > > >> > the
    > >> > > > >> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were
    > >> > > connected
    > >> > > > > to
    > >> > > > >> an
    > >> > > > >> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would
    > >> > > > >> > be
    > >> > even
    > >> > > > >> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter
    is
    > >> > rated
    > >> > > at
    > >> > > > >> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway
    > >> > > (especially
    > >> > > > > if
    > >> > > > >> I
    > >> > > > >> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it
    clearly
    > > can
    > >> > > > >> > handle
    > >> > > > >> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V?
    (sorry,
    > >> long
    > >> > > > >> question)
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all,
    > >> indicate
    > >> > > that
    > >> > > > > it
    > >> > > > >> > is 'Regulated'?
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or
    > >> > > > >> > the
    > >> > > highest
    > >> > > > > I
    > >> > > > >> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly
    > > that
    > >> > for
    > >> > > > > the
    > >> > > > >> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put
    out
    > >> that
    > >> > > > > average
    > >> > > > >> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it,
    > >> > > > >> > somewhat
    > >> > > anyway
    > >> > > > > as
    > >> > > > >> > the battery depleted itself)?
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it
    puts
    > > out
    > >> > an
    > >> > > > >> average
    > >> > > > >> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's
    > >> > > > >> > lifetime?
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I
    > > would
    > >> > > test
    > >> > > > > the
    > >> > > > >> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads
    > >> open),
    > >> > > > >> note
    > >> > > > >> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm
    > >> resistor,
    > >> > > but
    > >> > > > >> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one
    > > watt
    > >> > or
    > >> > > > > more
    > >> > > > >> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch).
    > >> > > > >> Put
    > >> > power
    > >> > > > >> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the
    > > voltage
    > >> > > stays
    > >> > > > > at
    > >> > > > >> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is
    > > regulated
    > >> > and
    > >> > > > > safe
    > >> > > > >> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity
    > >> > > > >> for
    > >> > > > > supplying
    > >> > > > >> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most
    > >> > > > >> power.
    > >> If
    > >> > > > >> there
    > >> > > > >> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be
    > >> > > conservative
    > >> > > > >> with flash use also.
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about
    > > 1.3-1.4
    > >> > > volts
    > >> > > > > no
    > >> > > > >> load.
    > >> > > > >> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one
    > > hour
    > >> > > > >> before
    > >> > > > >> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one
    hour
    > >> until
    > >> > > the
    > >> > > > >> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some
    current
    > >> > until
    > >> > > > >> the
    > >> > > > >> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection
    > > built-in
    > >> > that
    > >> > > > >> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best
    price.
    > >> The
    > >> > > > > higher
    > >> > > > >> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For
    > >> Digital
    > >> > > > >> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> --
    > >> > > > >> CSM1
    > >> > > > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> > > > >> --
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > >
    > >> > >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    There is no polarity switch, you alter the plug's polarity by how the plug
    connects to the cord, it has 2 identical prongs that go into 2 identical
    receptacles and depending on which prong goes into which hole the polarity
    of the plug is determined --- point taken, though. I'll tape it.
    So, if it goes bang and fills the room with evil plastic-smelling fumes,
    you'll buy me another one, right?

    (joke)

    I'll let you know what happens, but first I have to find a plug.


    "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:KDtJd.19532$wi2.19404@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > That was probably a good enough test.
    >
    > Since the voltage did not change from no load to half full load, the power
    > supply is regulated.
    > The next most important thing is to get the polarity correct.
    >
    > Look closely at the symbol next to the power connector on the camera, it
    > should have the polarity marked.
    > Use a magnifying glass to see the + or - symbol in the center of the
    > semicircle.
    >
    > Wire a connector to the power supply that fits the camera. Make sure the
    > polarity is correct for the center connector of the plug.
    > Put the power supply on 3 volts and DO NOT change to any other voltage.
    >
    > The A400 uses 2 AA batteries, so the voltage required is 3 volts.
    >
    > It would be a good idea to put tape on the voltage switch, so that it does
    > not get changed accidentally.
    >
    > Be brave, try it on the camera.
    >
    > If you want to buy the ACK 800 AC adapter kit, click this link. I have
    > seen
    > it for $30 at amazon.com.
    > http://www.google.com/froogle?q=AC+adapter+kit+ACK800+&btnG=Search+Froogle
    >
    > --
    > CSM1
    > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > --
    > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > news:WEjJd.163793$8l.10981@pd7tw1no...
    >> Ok, well it looks good, actually. I found a resistor that didn't have
    > color
    >> bands on it, but was red, and had 4R(7 or Z couldn't tell), and +-5% on
    > the
    >> other side. Since it is only necessary to hook it up momentarily to a
    >> low
    >> voltage I wasn't that worried about heat dissipation capacity.
    >> I checked the R with my multimetere and it showed exactly 4 Ohms of
    >> resistance.
    >> Then I set the adapter at 3V, with no load but the meter, and tested ---
    > it
    >> showed exactly 3V, to within a hair actually.
    >> Then I put the resistor in parallel with the meter and it showed exactly
    > the
    >> same voltage, no perceptible drop. And I know I had good connection with
    >> the resistor becaue, boy, did it ever get hot --- in the two seconds that
    >> power was applied, it got too hot to touch and I could smell the 'hot
    >> component' smell! No smoke, but next time I do something like this I'll
    > pay
    >> more attention to power ratings, I think.
    >> So there doesn't seem to be a problem with the adapter supplying enough
    > amps
    >> to a the camera, is there any way to ensure it won't push too much?
    >> No, I guess not because you said that the camera will only take what it
    >> needs, right? The only potential problem was that it couldn't supply
    > ENOUGH
    >> amps, and the voltage would sag(if I have it right), if it wasn't
    > regulated.
    >> Now there's another problem with using this adapter, which is that not
    > one,
    >> out of the dozen or so jacks that came with the adapter, fits the DC In
    >> receptacle on the camera. I'll go hunt around 2nd hand shops and see
    >> what
    > I
    >> can find.
    >>
    >> How's my methodology here, guys? Am I making any glaring mistakes?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    >> news:BaqdnTo-ALbsKWjcRVn-pg@golden.net...
    >> > Precision resirtors are printed text on the side. I believe precision
    >> > resistors can be ordered custom made or from a big supplier in any
    >> > value
    >> > desired for not too bad a price (a few years back). The time wait for
    > them
    >> > is brutal though.
    >> >
    >> > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    >> > news:btiJd.24026$iC4.15242@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    >> >> It has been years, I did not remember that the Gold and Silver
    > multiplier
    >> > is
    >> >> used below 10 ohms. I though it was one ohm.
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> CSM1
    >> >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> >> --
    >> >> "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    >> >> news:idydnY4SXqGWCmjcRVn-sg@golden.net...
    >> >> > Black, yellow, black isn't used in standard colour codes
    >> >> >
    >> >> > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    >> >> > news:JrgJd.19308$wi2.2137@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >> >> > > I have a 4.7 ohm 2 watt resistor.
    >> >> > > The color bands are yellow,violet,gold.
    >> >> > > So the bands for 4 ohms would be yellow, black,gold.
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > Or they could be black,yellow,black.
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > --
    >> >> > > CSM1
    >> >> > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> >> > > --
    >> >> > > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    >> >> > > news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    >> >> > > > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you
    >> >> > > > verify
    >> > the
    >> >> > > color
    >> >> > > > codes?
    >> >> > > > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow,
    >> >> > > > black,
    >> >> gold,
    >> >> > > > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that
    > critical
    >> > in
    >> >> > this
    >> >> > > > case.
    >> >> > > > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right
    >> >> > > > bands ---
    >> >> > CSM1?
    >> >> > > >
    >> >> > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    >> >> > > > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >> >> > > > >I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the
    >> > power
    >> >> > > > > adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts.
    >> >> > > > > The
    >> >> > > > > resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    >> >> > > > > (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    >> >> > > > >
    >> >> > > > > For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value
    >> >> > > > > is
    > 4
    >> >> > ohms,
    >> >> > > so
    >> >> > > > > 6
    >> >> > > > > V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    >> >> > > > >
    >> >> > > > > --
    >> >> > > > > CSM1
    >> >> > > > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> >> > > > > --
    >> >> > > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    >> >> > > > > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    >> >> > > > >> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    >> >> > > > >> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    >> >> > > > >> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    >> >> > > > >> >
    >> >> > > > >> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    >> >> > > > >> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a
    >> >> > Canadian
    >> >> > > > >> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    >> >> > > > >> > Model MWS1189UC
    >> >> > > > >> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    >> >> > > > >> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    >> >> > > > >> > Current 1700 mA
    >> >> > > > >> >
    >> >> > > > >> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that
    > were
    >> >> > rated
    >> >> > > at
    >> >> > > > >> 1.2V
    >> >> > > > >> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I
    > got
    >> >> home
    >> >> > > and
    >> >> > > > >> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I
    > finished
    >> >> > > charging
    >> >> > > > >> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when
    > hooked
    >> > up
    >> >> > to
    >> >> > > > >> > the
    >> >> > > > >> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they
    >> >> > > > >> > were
    >> >> > > connected
    >> >> > > > > to
    >> >> > > > >> an
    >> >> > > > >> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V
    >> >> > > > >> > would
    >> >> > > > >> > be
    >> >> > even
    >> >> > > > >> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter
    > is
    >> >> > rated
    >> >> > > at
    >> >> > > > >> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway
    >> >> > > (especially
    >> >> > > > > if
    >> >> > > > >> I
    >> >> > > > >> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it
    > clearly
    >> > can
    >> >> > > > >> > handle
    >> >> > > > >> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V?
    > (sorry,
    >> >> long
    >> >> > > > >> question)
    >> >> > > > >> >
    >> >> > > > >> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all,
    >> >> indicate
    >> >> > > that
    >> >> > > > > it
    >> >> > > > >> > is 'Regulated'?
    >> >> > > > >> >
    >> >> > > > >> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or
    >> >> > > > >> > the
    >> >> > > highest
    >> >> > > > > I
    >> >> > > > >> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean
    >> >> > > > >> > basicaly
    >> > that
    >> >> > for
    >> >> > > > > the
    >> >> > > > >> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put
    > out
    >> >> that
    >> >> > > > > average
    >> >> > > > >> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it,
    >> >> > > > >> > somewhat
    >> >> > > anyway
    >> >> > > > > as
    >> >> > > > >> > the battery depleted itself)?
    >> >> > > > >> >
    >> >> > > > >> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it
    > puts
    >> > out
    >> >> > an
    >> >> > > > >> average
    >> >> > > > >> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's
    >> >> > > > >> > lifetime?
    >> >> > > > >> >
    >> >> > > > >> >
    >> >> > > > >> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I
    >> > would
    >> >> > > test
    >> >> > > > > the
    >> >> > > > >> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    >> >> > > > >>
    >> >> > > > >> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load
    >> >> > > > >> (leads
    >> >> open),
    >> >> > > > >> note
    >> >> > > > >> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    >> >> > > > >>
    >> >> > > > >> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm
    >> >> resistor,
    >> >> > > but
    >> >> > > > >> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm,
    >> >> > > > >> one
    >> > watt
    >> >> > or
    >> >> > > > > more
    >> >> > > > >> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch).
    >> >> > > > >> Put
    >> >> > power
    >> >> > > > >> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the
    >> > voltage
    >> >> > > stays
    >> >> > > > > at
    >> >> > > > >> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is
    >> > regulated
    >> >> > and
    >> >> > > > > safe
    >> >> > > > >> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7
    >> >> > > > >> volts)
    >> >> > > > >>
    >> >> > > > >> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity
    >> >> > > > >> for
    >> >> > > > > supplying
    >> >> > > > >> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most
    >> >> > > > >> power.
    >> >> If
    >> >> > > > >> there
    >> >> > > > >> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be
    >> >> > > conservative
    >> >> > > > >> with flash use also.
    >> >> > > > >>
    >> >> > > > >> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about
    >> > 1.3-1.4
    >> >> > > volts
    >> >> > > > > no
    >> >> > > > >> load.
    >> >> > > > >> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some
    >> >> > > > >> use)
    >> >> > > > >>
    >> >> > > > >> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for
    >> >> > > > >> one
    >> > hour
    >> >> > > > >> before
    >> >> > > > >> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    >> >> > > > >>
    >> >> > > > >> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one
    > hour
    >> >> until
    >> >> > > the
    >> >> > > > >> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some
    > current
    >> >> > until
    >> >> > > > >> the
    >> >> > > > >> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection
    >> > built-in
    >> >> > that
    >> >> > > > >> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    >> >> > > > >>
    >> >> > > > >> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best
    > price.
    >> >> The
    >> >> > > > > higher
    >> >> > > > >> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For
    >> >> Digital
    >> >> > > > >> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    >> >> > > > >>
    >> >> > > > >> --
    >> >> > > > >> CSM1
    >> >> > > > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    >> >> > > > >> --
    >> >> > > > >>
    >> >> > > > >
    >> >> > > >
    >> >> > > >
    >> >> > >
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    "4R7" is the standard way of rating resistors in ohms. Back in about 1976
    the standards committees decided to replace the decimal point with "R" to
    make diagrams and components more readable. "K" replaces "kilo" and "M"
    replaces "Mega" etc...

    4K7 would be 4700 ohms and 3M125 would be 3.125 megohms.

    "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:WEjJd.163793$8l.10981@pd7tw1no...
    > Ok, well it looks good, actually. I found a resistor that didn't have
    color
    > bands on it, but was red, and had 4R(7 or Z couldn't tell), and +-5% on
    the
    > other side. Since it is only necessary to hook it up momentarily to a low
    > voltage I wasn't that worried about heat dissipation capacity.
    > I checked the R with my multimetere and it showed exactly 4 Ohms of
    > resistance.
    > Then I set the adapter at 3V, with no load but the meter, and tested ---
    it
    > showed exactly 3V, to within a hair actually.
    > Then I put the resistor in parallel with the meter and it showed exactly
    the
    > same voltage, no perceptible drop. And I know I had good connection with
    > the resistor becaue, boy, did it ever get hot --- in the two seconds that
    > power was applied, it got too hot to touch and I could smell the 'hot
    > component' smell! No smoke, but next time I do something like this I'll
    pay
    > more attention to power ratings, I think.
    > So there doesn't seem to be a problem with the adapter supplying enough
    amps
    > to a the camera, is there any way to ensure it won't push too much?
    > No, I guess not because you said that the camera will only take what it
    > needs, right? The only potential problem was that it couldn't supply
    ENOUGH
    > amps, and the voltage would sag(if I have it right), if it wasn't
    regulated.
    > Now there's another problem with using this adapter, which is that not
    one,
    > out of the dozen or so jacks that came with the adapter, fits the DC In
    > receptacle on the camera. I'll go hunt around 2nd hand shops and see what
    I
    > can find.
    >
    > How's my methodology here, guys? Am I making any glaring mistakes?
    >
    >
    >
    > "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    > news:BaqdnTo-ALbsKWjcRVn-pg@golden.net...
    > > Precision resirtors are printed text on the side. I believe precision
    > > resistors can be ordered custom made or from a big supplier in any value
    > > desired for not too bad a price (a few years back). The time wait for
    them
    > > is brutal though.
    > >
    > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:btiJd.24026$iC4.15242@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> It has been years, I did not remember that the Gold and Silver
    multiplier
    > > is
    > >> used below 10 ohms. I though it was one ohm.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> CSM1
    > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> --
    > >> "Gymmy Bob" <nothanksx@bite.me> wrote in message
    > >> news:idydnY4SXqGWCmjcRVn-sg@golden.net...
    > >> > Black, yellow, black isn't used in standard colour codes
    > >> >
    > >> > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > >> > news:JrgJd.19308$wi2.2137@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> > > I have a 4.7 ohm 2 watt resistor.
    > >> > > The color bands are yellow,violet,gold.
    > >> > > So the bands for 4 ohms would be yellow, black,gold.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > Or they could be black,yellow,black.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > --
    > >> > > CSM1
    > >> > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> > > --
    > >> > > "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > >> > > news:OSdJd.160478$Xk.128769@pd7tw3no...
    > >> > > > OK, I'm going to try to dig up a 4ohm resistor. Would you verify
    > > the
    > >> > > color
    > >> > > > codes?
    > >> > > > I believe for a 4 Ohm resistor, the bands would be yellow, black,
    > >> gold,
    > >> > > > brown. with the last band indicating tolerance, not that
    critical
    > > in
    > >> > this
    > >> > > > case.
    > >> > > > I don't even know if I've got one, but are those the right
    > >> > > > bands ---
    > >> > CSM1?
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > >> > > > news:HhbJd.19177$wi2.11806@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> > > > >I made a big miscalculation on the resistor needed to test the
    > > power
    > >> > > > > adapter. I said one watt, but the correct wattage is 10 watts.
    > >> > > > > The
    > >> > > > > resistance is 6/1.7=3.529 ohms.
    > >> > > > > (1700 ma=1.7 A)
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > > For a 10 watt wire wound resistor the nearest standard value is
    4
    > >> > ohms,
    > >> > > so
    > >> > > > > 6
    > >> > > > > V/4 ohms=1.5 or 1500 ma. 6 volts times 1.5 A = 9 watts.
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > > --
    > >> > > > > CSM1
    > >> > > > > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> > > > > --
    > >> > > > > "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > >> > > > > news:0NaJd.23946$iC4.15230@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> > > > >> "tom" <cyberhun@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > >> > > > >> news:fYYId.154987$8l.139015@pd7tw1no...
    > >> > > > >> > Hah! I finally found it. OK, on it it says ---
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > PLUG-IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
    > >> > > > >> > "MW Switching Universal Power Supply", made in China, and a
    > >> > Canadian
    > >> > > > >> > Underwriters Lab Symbol
    > >> > > > >> > Model MWS1189UC
    > >> > > > >> > Input 100V-140V, AC 60Hz, 28W
    > >> > > > >> > Output: 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12v DC.
    > >> > > > >> > Current 1700 mA
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > -I have a voltmeter and I tested some NiMH batteries that
    were
    > >> > rated
    > >> > > at
    > >> > > > >> 1.2V
    > >> > > > >> > (much to my surprise, I had assumed they were 1.5V, but I
    got
    > >> home
    > >> > > and
    > >> > > > >> > looked at the package and it said 1.2V) right after I
    finished
    > >> > > charging
    > >> > > > >> > them, and they were in fact, only putting out 1.2V when
    hooked
    > > up
    > >> > to
    > >> > > > >> > the
    > >> > > > >> > large resistance associated with a voltmeter, when they were
    > >> > > connected
    > >> > > > > to
    > >> > > > >> an
    > >> > > > >> > actual load of much lower resistance, I'm sure their V would
    > >> > > > >> > be
    > >> > even
    > >> > > > >> > less --- my point in all this being that even if my adapter
    is
    > >> > rated
    > >> > > at
    > >> > > > >> > 1700mAh, don't you think the camera could handle it anyway
    > >> > > (especially
    > >> > > > > if
    > >> > > > >> I
    > >> > > > >> > turned the LCD screen brightness way down) because it
    clearly
    > > can
    > >> > > > >> > handle
    > >> > > > >> > batteries that put out significantly less than 1.5V?
    (sorry,
    > >> long
    > >> > > > >> question)
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > -Does the fact that this adapter states a current at all,
    > >> indicate
    > >> > > that
    > >> > > > > it
    > >> > > > >> > is 'Regulated'?
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > -A lot of these NiMH batteries have ratings like 300mAh, or
    > >> > > > >> > the
    > >> > > highest
    > >> > > > > I
    > >> > > > >> > think was 2300mAh --- does this kind of rating mean basicaly
    > > that
    > >> > for
    > >> > > > > the
    > >> > > > >> > first hour of use, at the rated voltage of 1.5V, they put
    out
    > >> that
    > >> > > > > average
    > >> > > > >> > amount of current (because it would vary, wouldn't it,
    > >> > > > >> > somewhat
    > >> > > anyway
    > >> > > > > as
    > >> > > > >> > the battery depleted itself)?
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> > -If a NiMH battery was rated at 300mAh does that mean it
    puts
    > > out
    > >> > an
    > >> > > > >> average
    > >> > > > >> > of 300mA/hour at the rated voltage of 1.5V, over it's
    > >> > > > >> > lifetime?
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> >
    > >> > > > >> The Adapter may or may not be regulated, If it does not say I
    > > would
    > >> > > test
    > >> > > > > the
    > >> > > > >> adapter before using it on my digital camera.
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> Select 6 volts, measure the power supply without a load (leads
    > >> open),
    > >> > > > >> note
    > >> > > > >> the voltage (it must be 6 volts +- 5%).
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> To put a 1700 mA load at 6 volts you would need a 35.29 ohm
    > >> resistor,
    > >> > > but
    > >> > > > >> since the closest standard value is 36 ohms, use a 36 ohm, one
    > > watt
    > >> > or
    > >> > > > > more
    > >> > > > >> resistor. The resistor will get very warm (hot to the touch).
    > >> > > > >> Put
    > >> > power
    > >> > > > >> supply and the volt meter across the resistor to see if the
    > > voltage
    > >> > > stays
    > >> > > > > at
    > >> > > > >> 6 volts. If the voltage does not drop more than 5%, it is
    > > regulated
    > >> > and
    > >> > > > > safe
    > >> > > > >> to use on a digital camera. (5% drop from 6 volts = 5.7 volts)
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> However 1700 ma is very close to the minimum current capacity
    > >> > > > >> for
    > >> > > > > supplying
    > >> > > > >> a digital camera. Not using the LCD will conserve the most
    > >> > > > >> power.
    > >> If
    > >> > > > >> there
    > >> > > > >> is an optical viewfinder, use that to frame the picture. Be
    > >> > > conservative
    > >> > > > >> with flash use also.
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> On NiMH batteries, when fully charged the voltage is about
    > > 1.3-1.4
    > >> > > volts
    > >> > > > > no
    > >> > > > >> load.
    > >> > > > >> Nominal voltage is 1.25 volts. (they get better with some use)
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> The MaH rating is based on supplying the rated current for one
    > > hour
    > >> > > > >> before
    > >> > > > >> dropping to some stated minimum voltage (around 1 volt).
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> A fully charged 300 mah battery with supply 300 ma for one
    hour
    > >> until
    > >> > > the
    > >> > > > >> voltage is around 1 volt. (It would keep outputting some
    current
    > >> > until
    > >> > > > >> the
    > >> > > > >> battery is dead). Digital Cameras have a power protection
    > > built-in
    > >> > that
    > >> > > > >> shuts down the camera at some minimum voltage.
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> You want the highest Mah rating you can find for the best
    price.
    > >> The
    > >> > > > > higher
    > >> > > > >> the Mah the longer the batteries will operate the camera. For
    > >> Digital
    > >> > > > >> cameras, the minimum I would use is 1600 Mah.
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >> --
    > >> > > > >> CSM1
    > >> > > > >> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > >> > > > >> --
    > >> > > > >>
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > >
    > >> > >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    http://www.gizmos2go.com/xcart/customer/product.php?productid=3561

    Here's an example of a universal AC adapter for only $10.88. Now it says its for a digital camera. Is
    there a chance its not regulated?
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Put a load of 1/4th that of your device and measure the voltage. rplace with
    the device and measure. If they're equal - it's regulated!
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    No other way? I don't have a voltmeter.......

    > Put a load of 1/4th that of your device and measure the voltage. rplace with
    > the device and measure. If they're equal - it's regulated!
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Plug your camera in and if you get smoke, the power supply is not regulated.

    You take a big risk, not knowing.

    The label will say regulated or stabilized if it is. If the label does not
    say, it probably is not.

    Take the power supply to a electronic repair shop (TV shop) and have the
    tech check it.

    --
    CSM1
    http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    --
    "some guy" <nospam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:37emq2F5ceuipU1@individual.net...
    > No other way? I don't have a voltmeter.......
    >
    > > Put a load of 1/4th that of your device and measure the voltage. rplace
    with
    > > the device and measure. If they're equal - it's regulated!
    >
    >
  24. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    Not really true about the regulated. Most won't say since they are OEM
    specific.

    "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:OqvQd.47370$iC4.8881@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
    > Plug your camera in and if you get smoke, the power supply is not
    regulated.
    >
    > You take a big risk, not knowing.
    >
    > The label will say regulated or stabilized if it is. If the label does not
    > say, it probably is not.
    >
    > Take the power supply to a electronic repair shop (TV shop) and have the
    > tech check it.
    >
    > --
    > CSM1
    > http://www.carlmcmillan.com
    > --
    > "some guy" <nospam@spam.com> wrote in message
    > news:37emq2F5ceuipU1@individual.net...
    > > No other way? I don't have a voltmeter.......
    > >
    > > > Put a load of 1/4th that of your device and measure the voltage.
    rplace
    > with
    > > > the device and measure. If they're equal - it's regulated!
    > >
    > >
    >
Ask a new question

Read More

Cameras Power Supplies Build Peripherals Product