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So what is considered the best software?

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Anonymous
October 26, 2004 7:22:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I am converting my VHS movie collection to DVD and I want to try and
fit each movie on 1 blank DVD. What software makes this the easiest
with the best overall video quality? I just ordered a new 200 gig HD
so I may even archive the videos on my PC too.

Thanks,

Jeremy

More about : considered software

Anonymous
October 26, 2004 8:47:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Goodner79" <jtg30@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:fef4a451.0410261422.507c259a@posting.google.com...
> I am converting my VHS movie collection to DVD and I want to try and
> fit each movie on 1 blank DVD. What software makes this the easiest
> with the best overall video quality? I just ordered a new 200 gig HD
> so I may even archive the videos on my PC too.

tmpgenc does the best avi-to-mpg transcoding in software, though it is very,
very slow. It also estimates, with great accuracy, the size of the
resulting file and lets you alter file size and bit rate dynamically, which
is critical in trying to get the best quality video in limited space.

>
> Thanks,
>
> Jeremy
Anonymous
October 27, 2004 3:49:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Goodner79 wrote:
> I am converting my VHS movie collection to DVD and I want to try and
> fit each movie on 1 blank DVD. What software makes this the easiest
> with the best overall video quality? I just ordered a new 200 gig HD
> so I may even archive the videos on my PC too.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jeremy

Depends on what you will be watching them on in the future. Cheaper TVs are
not as demanding on the quality while high end viewing will need more
attention to final output. Get the newest DVD writer that will double layer
to allow what you want.
Example: http://www.compusa.com/products/products.asp?N=404851&C...

Software is plentiful
Related resources
October 27, 2004 3:49:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Cliff" <Cliff-f@NOSPAMxemaps.com> wrote:

>
> Depends on what you will be watching them on in the future. Cheaper TVs are
>not as demanding on the quality while high end viewing will need more
>attention to final output. Get the newest DVD writer that will double layer
>to allow what you want.
> Example: http://www.compusa.com/products/products.asp?N=404851&C...
>
> Software is plentiful
>
But keep in mind that dual layer media costs more than $2 while the
best rated single-layer media is 40 cents or so, that DL drives write
at just over 2x while single layer writes at 8x or faster, and that at
present, many more DVD players have trouble with recordable dual layer
media than with single layer media. And to make it a clean sweep,
compusa is the least respected (in terms of value for money) of the
major computer/office chains.

Sorry 'bout that.

Incidentally, almost any software you can put your hands on will
produce a DVD that captures all the quality on an ordinary VHS tape.
If you need it, a freeware program called DVDShrink takes DVD files
that are too big for a single-layer disc and compresses them further
so that they just fit. It takes an extra fifteen minutes or so,
depending on your computer speed. People use it to copy commercial
DVD's without compaint, so again it won't degrade VHS copies.

And of course you can buy standalone DVD writers that you can play
your tape into without needing a computer, if that appeals to you.
They seem to be available for $150 or less (and more, of course).
Anonymous
October 27, 2004 4:37:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On 26 Oct 2004 15:22:10 -0700, jtg30@hotmail.com (Goodner79) wrote:

>I am converting my VHS movie collection to DVD and I want to try and
>fit each movie on 1 blank DVD. What software makes this the easiest
>with the best overall video quality? I just ordered a new 200 gig HD
>so I may even archive the videos on my PC too.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Jeremy
Depends on what hardware you are using to get them on a hard drive and
in what format. Editing and burning them afterwards is the easy part.
There are a good dozen programs at all different prices but you have
to figure out what format you are going to use in capturing.
October 27, 2004 2:52:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Research the reviews of capture cards. Search past messages in this group
for a good deal of first hand comments on products.

The software is important, but since your main task is to convert tapes to
dvd, you will want hardware that does a good job on this.


"Goodner79" <jtg30@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:fef4a451.0410261422.507c259a@posting.google.com...
> I am converting my VHS movie collection to DVD and I want to try and
> fit each movie on 1 blank DVD. What software makes this the easiest
> with the best overall video quality? I just ordered a new 200 gig HD
> so I may even archive the videos on my PC too.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jeremy
October 28, 2004 7:51:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"PTravel" <ptravel@ruyitang.com> wrote in message
news:2u873tF26lu5kU1@uni-berlin.de...
>
> "Goodner79" <jtg30@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:fef4a451.0410261422.507c259a@posting.google.com...
>> I am converting my VHS movie collection to DVD and I want to try and
>> fit each movie on 1 blank DVD. What software makes this the easiest
>> with the best overall video quality? I just ordered a new 200 gig HD
>> so I may even archive the videos on my PC too.
>
> tmpgenc does the best avi-to-mpg transcoding in software, though it is
> very,
> very slow. It also estimates, with great accuracy, the size of the
> resulting file and lets you alter file size and bit rate dynamically,
> which
> is critical in trying to get the best quality video in limited space.
>
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Jeremy
>
>

Yes but how would he get his dvd collection onto pC to AVI to use TMPEGEnc
to go to mpeg?
seems like a heck of a lot of work to do there, lol
just use DVDShrink, it's free and works great!
Put a dvd onto one disk or HD and looks amazing, and is super fast.
For a project like that, it isn't even a choice. :) 
AnthonyR.
October 28, 2004 7:52:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Goodner79" <jtg30@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:fef4a451.0410261422.507c259a@posting.google.com...
>I am converting my VHS movie collection to DVD and I want to try and
> fit each movie on 1 blank DVD. What software makes this the easiest
> with the best overall video quality? I just ordered a new 200 gig HD
> so I may even archive the videos on my PC too.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jeremy

Jeremy,
Use a program called DVDShrink, it's free and works great!
It compresses most DVD9 movies onto one disk or HD and looks amazing, and is
super fast.
For a project like that, it isn't even a choice. :) 
It allows you to do much more, like remove unwanted chapters, audio tracks
etc...
AnthonyR.
October 28, 2004 7:56:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

PTravel, sorry about the previous post, I thought he said he was backing up
his DVD collection.
For VHS, he can definitely use TMPEnc to encode once they are captured to
avi, yes.
Sorry about the quick typing and slow reading!
AnthonyR.


"PTravel" <ptravel@ruyitang.com> wrote in message
news:2u873tF26lu5kU1@uni-berlin.de...
>
> "Goodner79" <jtg30@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:fef4a451.0410261422.507c259a@posting.google.com...
>> I am converting my VHS movie collection to DVD and I want to try and
>> fit each movie on 1 blank DVD. What software makes this the easiest
>> with the best overall video quality? I just ordered a new 200 gig HD
>> so I may even archive the videos on my PC too.
>
> tmpgenc does the best avi-to-mpg transcoding in software, though it is
> very,
> very slow. It also estimates, with great accuracy, the size of the
> resulting file and lets you alter file size and bit rate dynamically,
> which
> is critical in trying to get the best quality video in limited space.
>
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Jeremy
>
>
Anonymous
October 30, 2004 7:23:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Best" and "Easy" can't be used in the same sentence here. "Easy" means
using Ulead DVD Workshop to capture straight to Mpeg2 and then burn to DVD
with pretty good quality. "Best" involves using an DV camera with
Pass-through to transfer from your VCR to a firewire card and to your hard
drive. Then use a program like Vegas to add chapters (markers), trim and
fix up the video and finally render it to a very good quality Mpeg2 file.
Then use Vegas's sister program, DVD Architect to create your DVD. The
latter is the way I do it. Also, when putting VHS on a DVD, you can render
using Half D1 (352 x 480), since VHS doesn't require any more than this
resolution. This allows you to create an mpeg file at half the bitrate and
put twice as much on a DVD. -OR- use a normal bitrate and get higher
quality rendering.

I will explain further if you are interested.

Sanman


"Goodner79" <jtg30@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:fef4a451.0410261422.507c259a@posting.google.com...
>I am converting my VHS movie collection to DVD and I want to try and
> fit each movie on 1 blank DVD. What software makes this the easiest
> with the best overall video quality? I just ordered a new 200 gig HD
> so I may even archive the videos on my PC too.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jeremy
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 6:52:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Sanman" <me@you.com> wrote in message news:<y-mdneV15fTk3B7cRVn-hA@look.ca>...
> "Best" and "Easy" can't be used in the same sentence here. "Easy" means
> using Ulead DVD Workshop to capture straight to Mpeg2 and then burn to DVD
> with pretty good quality. "Best" involves using an DV camera with
> Pass-through to transfer from your VCR to a firewire card and to your hard
> drive. Then use a program like Vegas to add chapters (markers), trim and
> fix up the video and finally render it to a very good quality Mpeg2 file.
> Then use Vegas's sister program, DVD Architect to create your DVD. The
> latter is the way I do it. Also, when putting VHS on a DVD, you can render
> using Half D1 (352 x 480), since VHS doesn't require any more than this
> resolution. This allows you to create an mpeg file at half the bitrate and
> put twice as much on a DVD. -OR- use a normal bitrate and get higher
> quality rendering.
>
> I will explain further if you are interested.
>
> Sanman

OK I have a FlyView 3000 capture card and my next question is should I
capture from my VCR using the RCA cables or the regular "cable tv"
type connector. And is Pinnacle studio good software to use to
capture?

I will use DVD shrink and Nero for shrinking\burning.

thanks,

JT
Anonymous
November 12, 2004 3:02:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Goodner79 <jtg30@hotmail.com> wrote:
: OK I have a FlyView 3000 capture card and my next question is should I
: capture from my VCR using the RCA cables or the regular "cable tv"

Do you mean that you have FlyVideo 3000 from Lifeview company?
: type connector. And is Pinnacle studio good software to use to
: capture?

If that's the case, then you should be using the program Fly2000.
http://auzol.narod.ru

It's the best thing designed for Lifeview cards.

Throw your Pinnacle away.

--Leonid
Anonymous
November 12, 2004 11:16:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Here's my setup. I splurged somewhat when setting up a small business
but it has paid off and I would swear by the stuff I currently use.

Capture hardware: ATI All-in-Wonder 9800 pro
Capture software: ATI launchpad series (comes with the card above)
(I almost always capture directly to MPEG-2, and never with any
problems, but if I am doing some editing beyond just removing
commercials etc then I capture to AVI and edit with....)
Editing software: Adobe Premiere Pro
AVI-to-MPEG2 Converter (when needed): TMPGEnc Plus
MPEG-2 editor: Womble MPEG-VCR ('editor' is a bit of a misnomer; I use
this to cut commercials from captured TV programs and meandering,
meaningless shots from clients' home movies - that's it - but as mpeg
editors go, it's awesome).
DVD Authoring: Adobe Encore DVD (this software admittedly is maligned in
some circles but I personally think it is fantastic)
DVD Writing: TMPGEnc DVD Author (my one beef with Adobe Encore is that
when using its DVD-writing function, it is slooooow; TMPGEnc's DVD
Writer is way faster)

Some of this stuff, namely the Adobe software, is relatively high-end
for the average consumer. But I find the results to be well worth the
investment as well as the time spent learning the programs.

And one final note: I 100% whole-heartedly agree with the below poster's
comments about Pinnacle. Avoid any and all Pinnacle products like the
plague. Horrible, horrible stuff.

Leonid Makarovsky <venom@cs.bu.edu> wrote in news:cn0ujd$i4m$1
@news3.bu.edu:

> Goodner79 <jtg30@hotmail.com> wrote:
>: OK I have a FlyView 3000 capture card and my next question is should
I
>: capture from my VCR using the RCA cables or the regular "cable tv"
>
> Do you mean that you have FlyVideo 3000 from Lifeview company?
>: type connector. And is Pinnacle studio good software to use to
>: capture?
>
> If that's the case, then you should be using the program Fly2000.
> http://auzol.narod.ru
>
> It's the best thing designed for Lifeview cards.
>
> Throw your Pinnacle away.
>
> --Leonid
>
!