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About Adobe Premiere Pro 1.5

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 29, 2004 7:27:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

For those of you that are going to get 1.5 pro and or thinking about it, I
want to say that it is not that hard to learn if you know how to use Adobe
After Effects, otherwise it is going to be hard to catch on. I update from
6.5 and only had 1.5 one day. I found it much better because some of the
actions are done on the time line without having to open other windows. I
especially like the new motion in 1.5, as you can use like rubber bands to
do the actions, like opacity, and others. I am not pushing Premiere to
anyone, it is just that I started with Premiere and just kept updating. I
am sure that other programs are just as good. Now I know that Premiere was
way behind other programs like Final Cut Pro, Vegas, and they needed to
catch up.

Leo

More about : adobe premiere pro

Anonymous
October 29, 2004 11:58:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

PPro 1.5 did take some relearning for me, but I did a beta test on an
isolated system for about six months before I felt that we could do the move
to XP and switch over to 1.5. But now that we have, I can say that working
in 1.5 shortcuts many procedures that used to consume much time. And their
audio filters are phenomenal too. Overall, MUCH better, faster and easier to
use, once accustomed.
I like little things like the fact that the thumbnail size can be adjusted
on the timeline. This makes doing A-B roll editing MUCH easier, because the
timeline becomes like a pair of monitors--you can see the action on both
tracks and make your cuts accordingly instead of guessing. That alone saves
us tremendous time. There are many things like that in PPro 1.5 that
delight. I've personally mastered four DVDs from video that was edited in
1.5, since we converted late last summer. It's been amazingly smooth. Being
able to capture, edit, title, color correct, fix the audio and make the
master MPEG files (we use CinemaCraftSP) in a matter of a few days, and get
the master DLT ready in just a week for a DVD title is phenomenal timing. We
could not have come close to that kind of throughput with 6.5.


--
Take care,

Mark & Mary Ann Weiss

VIDEO PRODUCTION • FILM SCANNING • DVD MASTERING • AUDIO RESTORATION
Hear my Kurzweil Creations at: http://www.dv-clips.com/theater.htm
Business sites at:
www.dv-clips.com
www.mwcomms.com
www.adventuresinanimemusic.com
-
October 29, 2004 1:28:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> Take care,
>
> Mark & Mary Ann Weiss
>
> VIDEO PRODUCTION . FILM SCANNING . DVD MASTERING . AUDIO RESTORATION
> Hear my Kurzweil Creations at: http://www.dv-clips.com/theater.htm
> Business sites at:
> www.dv-clips.com
> www.mwcomms.com
> www.adventuresinanimemusic.com

Don't mean to hijack the thread but I just dropped back in here the last
week or so and recognize your signature. Thank you _so_ much for
recommending the Epson R200 printer last spring. I've printed over 200 DVD's
with it without a single problem. Prints to the hub, is simple to use and
the color prints from my digital camera are virtually indistinguishable from
commercial prints.

Only problem is the cost of ink, as I won't use OEM cartridges. What we've
recently ended up doing is buying a new printer when we run out of ink. With
a $25 USD off coupon at Staples, a new printer costs $75, which is $15
cheaper than buying six cartridges. We give the old printer to
family/friends because they don't mind using OEM cartridges. They spend
$30-40 to add all six cartridges, so they have a new printer for only that
amount. We've done that twice now.

Again, thanks for the recommendation. That's what makes this ng so useful.

_______________________________________________

Here's what I do with video:

http://www.onworldsedge.com/21452.html
Anonymous
October 31, 2004 6:06:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

>
> Don't mean to hijack the thread but I just dropped back in here the last
> week or so and recognize your signature. Thank you _so_ much for
> recommending the Epson R200 printer last spring. I've printed over 200
DVD's
> with it without a single problem. Prints to the hub, is simple to use and
> the color prints from my digital camera are virtually indistinguishable
from
> commercial prints.

Thank you for remembering!
We're still using the same cartridges on our Epson R300, as they are still
half full. Print quality on the latest batch of Samsung BeAll DVD-R white
printable discs is phenomenal--high contrast, crisp, vibrant colors. (The
earlier batches had that washed out, low contrast look).
The ONLY glitch we experience is that on the first printing, after a period
of non-use, the printer claims that the disc is not inserted properly, so
the first disc gets repositioned and a press of the red LED maintenance
button, and after that, subsequent discs print without error. It's
revolutionized throughput, just as adding a much faster burner to the
duplication center has. We can do a short run title, from raw footage to
scores of packaged DVDs sitting in the shipping dept in about a week and a
half. The R300 and the fast burners made that possible.


> Only problem is the cost of ink, as I won't use OEM cartridges. What we've
> recently ended up doing is buying a new printer when we run out of ink.
With
> a $25 USD off coupon at Staples, a new printer costs $75, which is $15
> cheaper than buying six cartridges. We give the old printer to
> family/friends because they don't mind using OEM cartridges. They spend
> $30-40 to add all six cartridges, so they have a new printer for only that
> amount. We've done that twice now.

That's a novel concept. Goes to show how the marketing of printers
works--they are a vehicle to sell ink. It is the golden egg that supports
the goose. And yes, I have noticed the absurdity of the reality that you can
buy a new printer for less than the cartridges. Talk about disposable
technology. It doesn't surprise me that printer manufacturers are suing
companies that make cloned cartridges and chips. They've a cash cow to
protect.

We recently ordered cartridges from Meritline, as the price was very low,
not realizing they were not OEM, but an alternative manufacturer. But I'm
going to be bold and try them out. One thing about the print heads being in
the cartridge, if you make a mistake, you can always buy a new cartridge and
get new printheads in the process. It will be interesting to see how these
cartridges work out.



> Again, thanks for the recommendation. That's what makes this ng so useful.

You're welcome!


> _______________________________________________
>
> Here's what I do with video:
>
> http://www.onworldsedge.com/21452.html
>
>

--
Take care,

Mark & Mary Ann Weiss

VIDEO PRODUCTION • FILM SCANNING • DVD MASTERING • AUDIO RESTORATION
Hear my Kurzweil Creations at: http://www.dv-clips.com/theater.htm
Business sites at:
www.dv-clips.com
www.mwcomms.com
www.adventuresinanimemusic.com
-
!