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recording in cold weather, then playback in warm room

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Anonymous
November 16, 2004 11:07:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

If you record something in cold weather, then play back the video in a
warm room, could you have problems?

I videotape a football game the other night. It was about 35 F
degrees (it seemed colder). Went to the coaches office to transfer
the video (on a canon zr60) to VCR. About 15-20 minutes into the
transfer, the video became distorted. I thought that the video heads
of the camcorder were dirty, so i used the tape cleaner tape. It
didn't help. I went and found another camcorder and it played. When
I got home, the tape still wouldn't play in the zr60. The next day it
played.

Could the differences of the temperatures cause problems? The zr60
says that condensation could cause problems, but it didn't give any
error warnings.
Anonymous
November 16, 2004 11:13:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"g wills" wrote ...
> If you record something in cold weather, then play
> back the video in a warm room, could you have problems?

It might affect the recording on the tape.
But it *most certainly* will affect the equipment.

Many (but apparently not all) camcorders and VCRs have a
"dew detector" that prevents even rolling tape under conditions
where temperature differentials may cause condensation on the
head drum.

> I videotape a football game the other night. It was about 35 F
> degrees (it seemed colder). Went to the coaches office to transfer
> the video (on a canon zr60) to VCR. About 15-20 minutes into the
> transfer, the video became distorted. I thought that the video heads
> of the camcorder were dirty, so i used the tape cleaner tape. It
> didn't help. I went and found another camcorder and it played. When
> I got home, the tape still wouldn't play in the zr60. The next day it
> played.
>
> Could the differences of the temperatures cause problems?

Quite likely.

> The zr60 says that condensation could cause problems,

Certainly will. Your experiment confirms that.

> but it didn't give any error warnings.

It may not have a "dew sensor" or it may be broken.
Anonymous
November 16, 2004 9:14:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

In article <vgcjp01joa34j399k3fap2ldjjpea9lq2v@4ax.com>, gbpars@cds.org
says...
> Subject: recording in cold weather, then playback in warm room
> From: g wills <gbpars@cds.org>
> Newsgroups: rec.video.desktop
>
> If you record something in cold weather, then play back the video in a
> warm room, could you have problems?
>
> I videotape a football game the other night. It was about 35 F
> degrees (it seemed colder). Went to the coaches office to transfer
> the video (on a canon zr60) to VCR. About 15-20 minutes into the
> transfer, the video became distorted. I thought that the video heads
> of the camcorder were dirty, so i used the tape cleaner tape. It
> didn't help. I went and found another camcorder and it played. When
> I got home, the tape still wouldn't play in the zr60. The next day it
> played.
>
> Could the differences of the temperatures cause problems? The zr60
> says that condensation could cause problems, but it didn't give any
> error warnings.
>
>

The manual for my camera says that you would not use the camera until it
is warmed up to room temperature because of condensation. I take my
tape out when I bring the camera in from the cold.
--
_________________________
Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia
http://www.ramsays-online.com
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 11:01:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:07:51 GMT, g wills <gbpars@cds.org> wrote:

>If you record something in cold weather, then play back the video in a
>warm room, could you have problems?
>
>I videotape a football game the other night. It was about 35 F
>degrees (it seemed colder). Went to the coaches office to transfer
>the video (on a canon zr60) to VCR. About 15-20 minutes into the
>transfer, the video became distorted. I thought that the video heads
>of the camcorder were dirty, so i used the tape cleaner tape. It
>didn't help. I went and found another camcorder and it played. When
>I got home, the tape still wouldn't play in the zr60. The next day it
>played.
>
>Could the differences of the temperatures cause problems? The zr60
>says that condensation could cause problems, but it didn't give any
>error warnings.

You have the lesson now - next time bring the camera into the heated
room sealed in a plastic bag to avoid the damp air settling on the
electronic parts. Don't open the bag for at least an hour. Remember
the camera does not bring in the damp. The humidity is in the room and
loves to settle on cold parts.

B.Pedersen Latitude -31,48.21 Longitude115,47.40 Time=GMT+8.00
If you are curious look here http://www.mapquest.com/maps/latlong.adp
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 11:01:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

nesredep egrob wrote:
> On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:07:51 GMT, g wills <gbpars@cds.org> wrote:
>
>> If you record something in cold weather, then play back the video in
>> a warm room, could you have problems?
>>
>> I videotape a football game the other night. It was about 35 F
>> degrees (it seemed colder). Went to the coaches office to transfer
>> the video (on a canon zr60) to VCR. About 15-20 minutes into the
>> transfer, the video became distorted. I thought that the video heads
>> of the camcorder were dirty, so i used the tape cleaner tape. It
>> didn't help. I went and found another camcorder and it played. When
>> I got home, the tape still wouldn't play in the zr60. The next day
>> it played.
>>
>> Could the differences of the temperatures cause problems? The zr60
>> says that condensation could cause problems, but it didn't give any
>> error warnings.
>
> You have the lesson now - next time bring the camera into the heated
> room sealed in a plastic bag to avoid the damp air settling on the
> electronic parts. Don't open the bag for at least an hour. Remember
> the camera does not bring in the damp. The humidity is in the room and
> loves to settle on cold parts.
>
> B.Pedersen Latitude -31,48.21 Longitude115,47.40 Time=GMT+8.00
> If you are curious look here http://www.mapquest.com/maps/latlong.adp


Only do that (...sealed in a plastic bag...) if you want your camera to
rust. The resulting condensation will be trapped and have no where to go
except on your camera parts if it's in a sealed bag.
Much better to either buy a proper camera cover or wait at least an hour for
everything to acclimatize before attempting transfers of any kind.

Mike
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 11:01:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Mike Kujbida wrote:

> nesredep egrob wrote:
>
>>On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:07:51 GMT, g wills <gbpars@cds.org> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>If you record something in cold weather, then play back the video in
>>>a warm room, could you have problems?
>>>
>>>I videotape a football game the other night. It was about 35 F
>>>degrees (it seemed colder). Went to the coaches office to transfer
>>>the video (on a canon zr60) to VCR. About 15-20 minutes into the
>>>transfer, the video became distorted. I thought that the video heads
>>>of the camcorder were dirty, so i used the tape cleaner tape. It
>>>didn't help. I went and found another camcorder and it played. When
>>>I got home, the tape still wouldn't play in the zr60. The next day
>>>it played.
>>>
>>>Could the differences of the temperatures cause problems? The zr60
>>>says that condensation could cause problems, but it didn't give any
>>>error warnings.
>>
>>You have the lesson now - next time bring the camera into the heated
>>room sealed in a plastic bag to avoid the damp air settling on the
>>electronic parts. Don't open the bag for at least an hour. Remember
>>the camera does not bring in the damp. The humidity is in the room and
>>loves to settle on cold parts.
>>
>>B.Pedersen Latitude -31,48.21 Longitude115,47.40 Time=GMT+8.00
>>If you are curious look here http://www.mapquest.com/maps/latlong.adp
>
>
>
> Only do that (...sealed in a plastic bag...) if you want your camera to
> rust. The resulting condensation will be trapped and have no where to go
> except on your camera parts if it's in a sealed bag.
> Much better to either buy a proper camera cover or wait at least an hour for
> everything to acclimatize before attempting transfers of any kind.

Nonsense! As the temperature rises, the relative humidity of the air
trapped in the bag will drop. There will be no condensation. OTOH if you
don't seal it in a bag there will be condensation almost as soon as you
enter the warmer room.
Anonymous
November 18, 2004 1:28:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 19:45:05 -0500, "Mike Kujbida"
<kujfam-misleadingspam@sympatico.ca> wrote:

>
>nesredep egrob wrote:
>> On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:07:51 GMT, g wills <gbpars@cds.org> wrote:
>>
>>> If you record something in cold weather, then play back the video in
>>> a warm room, could you have problems?
>>>
>>> I videotape a football game the other night. It was about 35 F
>>> degrees (it seemed colder). Went to the coaches office to transfer
>>> the video (on a canon zr60) to VCR. About 15-20 minutes into the
>>> transfer, the video became distorted. I thought that the video heads
>>> of the camcorder were dirty, so i used the tape cleaner tape. It
>>> didn't help. I went and found another camcorder and it played. When
>>> I got home, the tape still wouldn't play in the zr60. The next day
>>> it played.
>>>
>>> Could the differences of the temperatures cause problems? The zr60
>>> says that condensation could cause problems, but it didn't give any
>>> error warnings.
>>
>> You have the lesson now - next time bring the camera into the heated
>> room sealed in a plastic bag to avoid the damp air settling on the
>> electronic parts. Don't open the bag for at least an hour. Remember
>> the camera does not bring in the damp. The humidity is in the room and
>> loves to settle on cold parts.
>>
>> B.Pedersen Latitude -31,48.21 Longitude115,47.40 Time=GMT+8.00
>> If you are curious look here http://www.mapquest.com/maps/latlong.adp
>
>
>Only do that (...sealed in a plastic bag...) if you want your camera to
>rust. The resulting condensation will be trapped and have no where to go
>except on your camera parts if it's in a sealed bag.
>Much better to either buy a proper camera cover or wait at least an hour for
>everything to acclimatize before attempting transfers of any kind.
>
>Mike

You must have sat on your ears when the lessons on physics went by. I
heard them in danish at 10 years of age and they after 72 year are
still as clear as day.

If you want convincing think on that when we are trying to dry the
inside of car windows we set the airconditioner on cool to work full
blast on the windscreen - but maybe you live in a country like Denmark
or England where they do not have airconditioning in cars :-)

B.Pedersen Latitude -31,48.21 Longitude115,47.40 Time=GMT+8.00
If you are curious look here http://www.mapquest.com/maps/latlong.adp
Anonymous
November 18, 2004 1:28:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Gee, I thought B.Pedersen made sense.

The problem is moisture collecting on the cold parts
within the camera. The idea is to keep the camera dry,
not to just let it get wet, and then try to dry it out.

If the is when you take a camera dry into a cold environment,
it will not get condensation (condensation happens when
cold things come into a warm environment).

If you then place the dry camera into a plastic bag while
it is still dry and cold, and then bring it indors, moisture
would collect on the outside of the cold bag, but there isn't
enough moisture inside the bag for the camera to get wet.

Once the camera comes up to the room temperature, you
can take it out of the dry bag, and it should be fine.

Did I miss something?

David
Anonymous
November 18, 2004 1:28:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

No, David, you did not - you are right.
This "procedure" is exactly the same procedure I always perform and have
never seen my camcorder (camera, handy...) get wet.
Roman

david.mccall wrote:

> Gee, I thought B.Pedersen made sense.
>
> The problem is moisture collecting on the cold parts
> within the camera. The idea is to keep the camera dry,
> not to just let it get wet, and then try to dry it out.
>
> If the is when you take a camera dry into a cold environment,
> it will not get condensation (condensation happens when
> cold things come into a warm environment).
>
> If you then place the dry camera into a plastic bag while
> it is still dry and cold, and then bring it indors, moisture
> would collect on the outside of the cold bag, but there isn't
> enough moisture inside the bag for the camera to get wet.
>
> Once the camera comes up to the room temperature, you
> can take it out of the dry bag, and it should be fine.
>
> Did I miss something?
>
> David
>
>
Anonymous
November 18, 2004 1:28:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

In article <cng58n$1aik$1@ns.felk.cvut.cz>, gemini@post.mbc.sk says...
> Subject: Re: recording in cold weather, then playback in warm room
> From: Roman Svihorik <gemini@post.mbc.sk>
> Newsgroups: rec.video.desktop
>
> No, David, you did not - you are right.
> This "procedure" is exactly the same procedure I always perform and have
> never seen my camcorder (camera, handy...) get wet.
> Roman
>
> david.mccall wrote:
>

You could always throw a packet of desiccant in with it too if you want
to be completely sure.
--
_________________________
Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia
http://www.ramsays-online.com
!