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US DVD players ntsc / pal

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Anonymous
November 21, 2004 8:58:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

In Australia (PAL) most dvd players can handle NTSC discs - what's it like
over in the states? Do many players / tv systems handle PAL DVD's?

Matt

More about : dvd players ntsc pal

Anonymous
November 21, 2004 8:58:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Matt Bourke" wrote ...
> In Australia (PAL) most dvd players can handle NTSC discs -
> what's it like over in the states? Do many players / tv systems
> handle PAL DVD's?

Likely mostly the ultra-cheap Chinese players. But almost no
TV/monitors that will display PAL in the consumer market,
at least not in the US. (Likely Canadia as well?)

Remember that your equipment likely doesn't do *real* NTSC,
but only "fake-NTSC" (aka. PAL-60) with NTSC-like sweep
rates, but PAL-like color encoding (hetrodyned from the NTSC
Fsc to the PAL Fsc) People who try to capture PAL60 quickly
discover the difference.
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 1:18:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Richard Crowley wrote:

> Remember that your [Australian consumer multistandard DVD
> player] equipment likely doesn't do *real* NTSC, but only
> "fake-NTSC" (aka. PAL-60) with NTSC-like sweep rates,

The above has been true for PAL VHS players with NTSC playback
capability. However, it is generally _not_ true for modern DVD
players, which more often than not _can_ output real NTSC
signal, even in PAL countries. (Mind you, PAL countries get
the same cheap Chinese players as you, and these usually have
all the same basic capabilities in the firmware [and in their
video encoder chip] all over the world - regardless of the
locale where they are being sold - even though they usually
have their power supply, default DVD region number and
backside connectors customized for each local market.)

Moreover, many of the larger PAL sets now have an integrated
NTSC 4.43 / NTSC 3.58 color decoder as well (yes, both standards)
- alongside with the capability of decoding "normal" 625/50 PAL
and 525/60 "PAL-60", _AND_ RGB through the Scart connector. (The
last one especially in Europe - I do not know about OZ/NZ
situation, maybe they are more likely to have YPbPr component
connectors instead?)

As for playing back DVDs - and this is an European view on the
matters - most of the time you can get the best picture quality
by ditching both PAL and NTSC altogether, and using the Scart
connector, and RGB signals instead - provided that the DVD
player has a Scart connector and RGB outputs as well (which
they usually do on the models localized for PAL markets, at least
in Europe) In other words, if you have someone playing back
NTSC DVDs on a PAL tv set, chances are that RGB signal format
(instead of PAL or NTSC color encoding) is being used (or _should_
be used, to get the best possible picture quality.)

--
znark
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 1:18:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Jukka Aho" wrote ...
> Richard Crowley wrote:
>> Remember that your [Australian consumer multistandard DVD
>> player] equipment likely doesn't do *real* NTSC, but only
>> "fake-NTSC" (aka. PAL-60) with NTSC-like sweep rates,
>
> The above has been true for PAL VHS players with NTSC playback capability.
> However, it is generally _not_ true for modern DVD players, which more
> often than not _can_ output real NTSC signal, even in PAL countries.
> .......

Thanks, Jukka
!