High-speed USB 2.0

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

Hello!

I am looking for a digital camera that supports high-speed USB 2.0,
that is a data rate of >12Mbit/s.

So far I've found the Sony Cyber-shot P100 and P120. The other one I
know is the HP PhotoSmart R707.

During my research I came across several cameras that claim USB 2.0
compatibility, but don't specifically say "high-speed USB 2.0" in their
specs. I suspect those manufacturers are trying to fool customers
about this, since the interface transfer rate doesn't go up all the way
to the theoretical 480 Mbit/s (I know that the limitation is on the
memory cards, which deliver only up to 6-8 Mbyte/s).

Example for this is the KonicaMinolta DiMage X50, it's specs say: "USB:
Full-speed 12 Mbps data transfer with a USB 2.0 compatible computer".
I believe they want the consumers who quickly browse through the specs
to read "USB 2.0", but the asterisk refers to a fine-print on the
bottom that limits it to Full-speed USB (12Mbit/s).

Do you know any other cameras that support high-speed USB 2.0?

Thanks for your input!

- Alex
3 answers Last reply
More about high speed
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    On Sun, 08 May 2005 14:07:05 GMT, Alex <claw@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >I am looking for a digital camera that supports high-speed USB 2.0,
    >that is a data rate of >12Mbit/s.
    >
    >So far I've found the Sony Cyber-shot P100 and P120. The other one I
    >know is the HP PhotoSmart R707.
    >
    >During my research I came across several cameras that claim USB 2.0
    >compatibility, but don't specifically say "high-speed USB 2.0" in their
    >specs. I suspect those manufacturers are trying to fool customers
    >about this, since the interface transfer rate doesn't go up all the way
    >to the theoretical 480 Mbit/s (I know that the limitation is on the
    >memory cards, which deliver only up to 6-8 Mbyte/s).

    For the CF format, that's just not true:
    http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/multi_page.asp?cid=6007-6894 - it's
    just a matter of having the best card-reader and the fastest card.

    >Example for this is the KonicaMinolta DiMage X50, it's specs say: "USB:
    >Full-speed 12 Mbps data transfer with a USB 2.0 compatible computer".
    >I believe they want the consumers who quickly browse through the specs
    >to read "USB 2.0", but the asterisk refers to a fine-print on the
    >bottom that limits it to Full-speed USB (12Mbit/s).
    >
    >Do you know any other cameras that support high-speed USB 2.0?

    Why don't You just get a (High-Speed) USB 2.0 card reader? My
    SanDisk ImageMate is very light, compact and portable!

    You really should decide on buying a digicam based on other
    parameters than the connectivity options... But I decided against
    MemoryStick and xD Picture Card when I bought my first digicam for
    myself, so I can see it's a valid point - just not the best :p
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    On 2005-05-08 23:22:13 +0200, Rolf Egil Sølvik <rolfegil@c2i.net> said:

    > On Sun, 08 May 2005 14:07:05 GMT, Alex <claw@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >> I am looking for a digital camera that supports high-speed USB 2.0,
    >> that is a data rate of >12Mbit/s.
    >>
    >> So far I've found the Sony Cyber-shot P100 and P120. The other one I
    >> know is the HP PhotoSmart R707.
    >>
    >> During my research I came across several cameras that claim USB 2.0
    >> compatibility, but don't specifically say "high-speed USB 2.0" in their
    >> specs. I suspect those manufacturers are trying to fool customers
    >> about this, since the interface transfer rate doesn't go up all the way
    >> to the theoretical 480 Mbit/s (I know that the limitation is on the
    >> memory cards, which deliver only up to 6-8 Mbyte/s).
    >
    > For the CF format, that's just not true:
    > http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/multi_page.asp?cid=6007-6894 - it's
    > just a matter of having the best card-reader and the fastest card.

    Yes, you're right. I didn't look into CF cards, but those fast ones
    mentioned are the really top of the line, mostly > 1GB ones

    >
    >> Example for this is the KonicaMinolta DiMage X50, it's specs say: "USB:
    >> Full-speed 12 Mbps data transfer with a USB 2.0 compatible computer".
    >> I believe they want the consumers who quickly browse through the specs
    >> to read "USB 2.0", but the asterisk refers to a fine-print on the
    >> bottom that limits it to Full-speed USB (12Mbit/s).
    >>
    >> Do you know any other cameras that support high-speed USB 2.0?
    >
    > Why don't You just get a (High-Speed) USB 2.0 card reader? My
    > SanDisk ImageMate is very light, compact and portable!
    >
    > You really should decide on buying a digicam based on other
    > parameters than the connectivity options... But I decided against
    > MemoryStick and xD Picture Card when I bought my first digicam for
    > myself, so I can see it's a valid point - just not the best :p

    Good point. But when I see myself taking out the card and sticking it
    to a card reader that I really don't want neither on my desk nor
    carrying around along with my iBook, then I will bite my a... for not
    having thought of it the moment I bought the camera.

    And the features of the Sony Cyber-shot P100 do not sound that bad
    after all. I was asking you guys because maybe there are more
    high-speed USB cameras out there I haven't discovered yet and that I
    might be considering in my decision.

    Thanks.

    - Alex
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

    On Sun, 08 May 2005 22:06:20 GMT, Alex <claw@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >And the features of the Sony Cyber-shot P100 do not sound that bad
    >after all. I was asking you guys because maybe there are more
    >high-speed USB cameras out there I haven't discovered yet and that I
    >might be considering in my decision.

    Just get the memory reader and don't worry about the USB speed of your
    camera. Many camera don't come with any power supply so using your
    camera connected to the computer via USB also drains the battery.

    Most external USB reader can be very small and I think there's a MS/MS
    Pro only version that is about the size of most "thumb drive" so it
    will take very little space with your iBook. Or you could just get a
    single big memory stick or 2 and transfer them to your desktop when
    you get back.

    I have an internal 8-in-1 card reader that is out of my way when not
    needed and takes up a floppy drive slot (who needs floppy disk these
    day?) The only issue I have with that memory card is no MS Pro
    support but up until this year I never needed one.

    My main camera uses MS and MS Pro (and all Duo with adapters) and has
    1 GB Pro installed, my slightly older backup camera uses SD (512
    installed). with those 2 and lots of memory space, I can take lots of
    shots even on long vacation and not have to worry about running out of
    memory space too soon.
    --
    When you hear the toilet flush, and hear the words "uh oh", it's already
    too late. - by anonymous Mother in Austin, TX
    To reply, replace digi.mon with phreaker.net
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