Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Capture the whole tape or not?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
December 17, 2004 6:44:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hi

What is the better method of editing in Premiere Pro.

1. To capture the whole DV tape and either place on the timeline and
edit using the Razor tool, or select various in/out points on the
captured footage and place on the timeline.

2. Run through the tape making a list of the shoots needed then import
each one, trim and place on the time line.

Also does Premiere have a built-in tool for detecting if a same piece
of source footage has been used more than twice on the timeline.

Cheers

Mike

More about : capture tape

Anonymous
December 17, 2004 6:44:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

<m@atter.com> wrote ...
> What is the better method of editing in Premiere Pro.
>
> 1. To capture the whole DV tape and either place on the timeline and
> edit using the Razor tool, or select various in/out points on the
> captured footage and place on the timeline.
>
> 2. Run through the tape making a list of the shoots needed then import
> each one, trim and place on the time line.

Depends on your personal preference, how much time you have,
how much disk space you have, your shooting ratio, etc. etc. etc.

> Also does Premiere have a built-in tool for detecting if a same piece
> of source footage has been used more than twice on the timeline.

Premiere shows how many times each clip (audio and video) has
been used in the timeline. However, note that if you capture the
entire raw footage as a single "clip" then Premire has no choice
but to count it as a single "clip".
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 7:02:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

<m@atter.com> wrote in message
news:lru5s05kvjj9gm7515pecqdi4dmjs74mpt@4ax.com...
> Hi
>
> What is the better method of editing in Premiere Pro.
>
> 1. To capture the whole DV tape and either place on the timeline and
> edit using the Razor tool, or select various in/out points on the
> captured footage and place on the timeline.
>
> 2. Run through the tape making a list of the shoots needed then import
> each one, trim and place on the time line.
>

I use method 2. Organization is easier and I only use as much HD space as I
need.


> Also does Premiere have a built-in tool for detecting if a same piece
> of source footage has been used more than twice on the timeline.






>
> Cheers
>
> Mike
Related resources
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 7:12:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 15:44:56 +0000, "m@atter.com" <m@atter.com> wrote:

>Hi
>
>What is the better method of editing in Premiere Pro.
>
>1. To capture the whole DV tape and either place on the timeline and
>edit using the Razor tool, or select various in/out points on the
>captured footage and place on the timeline.

If you do this, doesn't all the footage end up on the same video line?
- Meaning that adding cross-fades at the edits would be a pain?

>2. Run through the tape making a list of the shoots needed then import
>each one, trim and place on the time line.

--
Owamanga!
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 2:35:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 15:44:56 +0000, "m@atter.com" <m@atter.com> wrote:

>Hi
>
>What is the better method of editing in Premiere Pro.
>
>1. To capture the whole DV tape and either place on the timeline and
>edit using the Razor tool, or select various in/out points on the
>captured footage and place on the timeline.
>
>2. Run through the tape making a list of the shoots needed then import
>each one, trim and place on the time line.

Both work. I usually use method #1 with variations. I use a
capture tool (or Pinnacle's plugin) which will create separate clips
from a single capture. It detects both time/date changes and visual
scene changes, and while the latter sometimes mistakes fast action in
a scene for a change, it is still faster than going through them
manually.

If the material is mostly from one scene, but is going to have a few
shots taken out of it and most tossed, the automatic tools can't help
there. So I still capture the whole thing, then edit on the timeline.
Once all are done, I can move all the clips back into the bin,
allowing automated placement and resorting onto an empty timeline (all
will be clip aliases).

Method #2 requires running the actual tape prior to capture. If I
know that I'm only going to use a small portion of the tape, and have
a good idea where the parts are, this is pretty efficient. Otherwise,
I find it easier to capture the whole thing, then cut it apart on the
computer, rather than handling the tape.

One nice thing about method #1 in all forms is that you can simply
set up captures for each tape, let those run unattended, while you do
something else. It makes a good use of down time, and is even more
efficient if you have something to do which doesn't involve the
computer doing the capturing.


--
*-__Jeffery Jones__________| *Starfire* |____________________-*
** Muskego WI Access Channel 14/25 <http://www.execpc.com/~jeffsj/mach7/&gt;
*Starfire Design Studio* <http://www.starfiredesign.com/&gt;
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 9:41:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Oh, DV editing is a hobby, is not it?
Therefore I would say it is a joy ;-)
Roman

Owamanga wrote:
> If you do this, doesn't all the footage end up on the same video line?
> - Meaning that adding cross-fades at the edits would be a pain?
!